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This trope comes in many forms, which are listed below (and it's a looong list), as well as tropes that can be compared, connected and contrasted to:

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This trope comes in many forms, which are listed below (and it's a looong ''long'' list), as well as tropes that can be compared, connected and contrasted to:

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* RevengeBeforeReason: A lot of revenge stories portray revenge in a negative light. The protagonist might start a CycleOfRevenge, with others now wanting them dead because of their actions. There's also a tendency for innocents who had [[MisplacedRetribution nothing to do with the protagonist's revenge to get caught in the crossfires]]. Despite the problems revenge can cause, it's quite common to see fans root for the revenge seeker. They don't care about who gets caught up in the protagonist's desire for revenge, and see them as cool for their actions.


* MisaimedFandom/{{Other}}

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* MisaimedFandom/{{Other}}MisaimedFandom/OtherMedia


The work and its creator have acquired a Misaimed Fandom. It's around this point that the writer learns exactly how different he is from his fans... and, often, [[ArtistDisillusionment actively begins to hate them]].

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The work and its creator have acquired a [[TitleDrop Misaimed Fandom.Fandom]]. It's around this point that the writer learns exactly how different he is from his fans... and, often, [[ArtistDisillusionment actively begins to hate them]].



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Let's cut to the chase: Fans are an odd group of people.


Only... it [[GoneHorriblyWrong doesn't quite work like that]]. Instead of seeing a loathsome, hateful figure, the audience sees a [[TheWoobie Woobie]] who only is the way he is because of his [[WellDoneSonGuy daddy issues]], and feel sorry for him instead of hating him... or even [[DracoInLeatherPants find him cute]]. They take the author's painstaking [[PoesLaw satire at face value]]. The CrapsackWorld the writer has created is somewhere they think is pretty awesome. They have, in the writer's view, missed the point: ignoring the subtext that the writer had thought was obvious in favor of the ''text'' -- and they really like the text. The majority of time the readers realize what the writer intended, but simply disagree. After all, just because the writer loathes certain traits doesn't mean the reader will do so.

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Only... it [[GoneHorriblyWrong doesn't quite work like that]]. Instead of seeing a loathsome, hateful figure, the audience sees a [[TheWoobie Woobie]] who only is the way he is because of his [[WellDoneSonGuy daddy issues]], and feel sorry for him instead of hating him... or even [[DracoInLeatherPants find him cute]]. They take the author's painstaking [[PoesLaw satire at face value]]. The CrapsackWorld the writer has created is somewhere they think is pretty awesome. They have, in the writer's view, missed the point: ignoring the subtext that the writer had thought was obvious in favor of the ''text'' -- and they really like the text. The majority of time the readers realize what the writer intended, but simply disagree. After all, just because the writer loathes certain traits doesn't mean the reader will do so.



There are many paths leading to a Misaimed Fandom, but many of them originate from the 'DeathOfTheAuthor' theory; the idea that the audience can interpret a work however they like, regardless of what the author says. No matter how many times WordOfGod states their case, there's always going to be a large portion of the readers who will have their own very different perspective. And they're always going to be able to [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory find something in the text]] to help [[EpilepticTrees their case]], whether the author intended it to be there or not.

Of course, while fans are entitled to their own interpretation, that does not mean they are always right. The writer's original intention might not be the only valid interpretation, but it probably shouldn't be dismissed out of hand either; they're the ones actually putting their thoughts down and getting them published, after all. But this doesn't mean that fans have to worship at the writer's feet. Works have to stand by themselves and there is a limit to what authorial intent can change. Ultimately: when words and images clearly depict A, no WordOfGod can make it B.

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There are many paths leading to a Misaimed Fandom, but many of them originate from the 'DeathOfTheAuthor' theory; the idea that the audience can interpret a work however they like, regardless of what the author says. No matter how many times WordOfGod states their case, there's always going to be a large portion of the readers who will have their own very different perspective. And [[ConfirmationBias they're always going to be able able]] to [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory find something in the text]] to help [[EpilepticTrees their case]], whether the author intended it to be there or not.

Of course, while fans are entitled to their own interpretation, that does not mean they are always right. The writer's original intention might not be the only valid interpretation, but it probably shouldn't be dismissed out of hand hand, either; they're the ones actually putting their thoughts down and getting them published, after all. But this doesn't mean that fans have to worship at the writer's feet. Works have to stand by themselves and there is a limit to what authorial intent can change. Ultimately: when words and images clearly depict A, no WordOfGod can make it B.



Sometimes Misaimed Fandom is a matter of ValuesDissonance or CultureClash: where a writer doesn't recognise (or actively disagrees with) social changes they may perceive Misaimed Fandom about their work as villains and heroes switch places in the popular mind, or the failure to recognize that people of different cultures, political points of view, or backgrounds will see the story and characters in a different way than the writer intended.

In some cases, the reader may genuinely be seeing something that isn't there, or might not be looking hard enough; if the text isn't read correctly then the interpretation that follows is naturally going to be flawed. The reader might miss some of the more subtle meanings or interpretations. Alternatively, they might read the text too closely, and [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory find symbolism and meaning that the author never intended]] -- especially if the symbolism in question is something quite obscure, that the author may not necessarily be aware of. And, of course, they may just be missing the point.

Often, however, the fans know full well that their interpretation of the text isn't that of the author, and may acknowledge what the author was trying to do, but [[{{Applicability}} choose their own interpretation anyway]]. They may be aware that the author is satirizing them and their views, but they're good sports and can [[InsultBackfire appreciate]] a well-done jab in the ribs, especially if it's [[AffectionateParody not without affection]] or they think it's ActuallyPrettyFunny. Thus an unlikely fandom is not necessarily Misaimed.

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Sometimes Misaimed Fandom is a matter of ValuesDissonance or CultureClash: where a writer doesn't recognise (or actively disagrees with) social changes changes, they may perceive Misaimed Fandom about their work as villains and heroes switch places in the popular mind, or the failure to recognize that people of different cultures, political points of view, or backgrounds will see the story and characters in a different way than the writer intended.

In some cases, the reader may genuinely be seeing something that isn't there, or might not be looking hard enough; if the text isn't read correctly correctly, then the interpretation that follows is naturally going to be flawed. The reader might miss some of the more subtle meanings or interpretations. Alternatively, they might read the text too closely, and [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory find symbolism and meaning that the author never intended]] -- especially if the symbolism in question is something quite obscure, that the author may not necessarily be aware of. And, of course, they may just be missing the point.

Often, however, the fans know full well that their interpretation of the text isn't that of the author, and may acknowledge what the author was trying to do, but [[{{Applicability}} choose their own interpretation anyway]]. They may be aware that the author is satirizing them and their views, but they're good sports and can [[InsultBackfire appreciate]] a well-done jab in the ribs, especially if it's [[AffectionateParody not without affection]] or they think it's ActuallyPrettyFunny. Thus Thus, an unlikely fandom is not necessarily Misaimed.


* TheScrappy: Sometimes justified, but [[SturgeonsLaw most of the time]] it's just because of [[HateDumb Bandwagon Haters]]. Also see CreatorsPet.

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* TheScrappy: [[HateSink Sometimes justified, justified (when deliberately invoked by the creator)]], but [[SturgeonsLaw most of the time]] it's just because of [[HateDumb Bandwagon Haters]]. Also see CreatorsPet.


* TheManIsStickingItToTheMan


* PeripheryDemographic: This trope's polar opposite, where a character or work is intensely hated by people it wasn't supposed to appeal to.

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* PeripheryDemographic: PeripheryDemographic
* PeripheryHatedom:
This trope's polar opposite, where a character or work is intensely hated by people it wasn't supposed to appeal to.


* PeripheryDemographic

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* PeripheryDemographicPeripheryDemographic: This trope's polar opposite, where a character or work is intensely hated by people it wasn't supposed to appeal to.


The writer has a vision. They've created a character who represents everything they loathe, and has placed him in [[CrapsackWorld a setting that satirizes everything they hate about modern society]]. Bring on the MoralGuardians and {{Media Watchdog}}s; they're prepared for controversy!

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The writer has There are writers with a vision. They've vision who have created a character who represents everything they loathe, and has have placed him in [[CrapsackWorld a setting that satirizes everything they hate about modern society]]. Bring on the MoralGuardians and {{Media Watchdog}}s; they're prepared for controversy!

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* PraisingShowsYouDontWatch: It's easy for someone to miss the point of a show they've never watched, as they won't know what the point was, and might only like the show for what's on the surface rather than its themes.


* EnsembleDarkhorse: Can intersect with FanDumb.

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* EnsembleDarkhorse: Can intersect with FanDumb.DracoInLeatherPants.



* FollowTheLeader: A successful work can lead to other creators trying to copy its success, without understanding why the initial work became so popular in the first place.



* RonTheDeathEater: A character isn't evil, but is treated as such by fans.

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* RonTheDeathEater: A character isn't evil, but is treated as such by fans. This trope can overlap with TheScrappy.


--> -- '''Jean Cocteau'''


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--> -- '''Jean Cocteau'''

'''Creator/JeanCocteau'''

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