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** This is incidentally exactly what happened in Myth/ClassicalMythology as well in the case of King Minos. When asked to save Crete from a disaster, Poseidon agreed and sent a pure white bull to Minos and asked him to publicly sacrifice it after the disaster as a sign of respect. Instead, Minos swapped it out with a decently good but not divinely-granted bull, and as revenge Poseidon made his love Pasiphae fall in love with the white bull, thus begetting the Minotaur.


* This is used in the ''{{Literature/Discworld}}'' novel ''Discworld/GoingPostal'', in which conman Moist von Lipwig views a real ring and a fake ring as part of his basic tools for emergencies. When the man wants to have it valued and they go to an actual jeweler he shows the man a real diamond ring. Reassured that it's real the mark then buys the ring, and when he takes it back to the jeweler to sell he's informed that it's brass and glass.

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* This is used in the ''{{Literature/Discworld}}'' novel ''Discworld/GoingPostal'', ''Literature/GoingPostal'', in which conman Moist von Lipwig views a real ring and a fake ring as part of his basic tools for emergencies. When the man wants to have it valued and they go to an actual jeweler he shows the man a real diamond ring. Reassured that it's real the mark then buys the ring, and when he takes it back to the jeweler to sell he's informed that it's brass and glass.

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* A complicated version is used in the original version of ''{{Literature/Aladdin}}'': The evil sorcerer('s brother) determines that Aladdin is now rich and powerful thanks to the power of a worn-out old lamp he keeps in his palace. So he waits for Aladdin to be out of town, buys a bunch of new lamps, and goes around town asking who wants to exchange their old lamps for new ones. He ends up drawing such a crowd that the princess (Aladdin's wife) hears what's going on, and then decides to take him up on his offer. The instant the sorcerer has the lamp genie under his command, he teleports himself, the palace, and the princess away.


Not a gambler? Smart man! Hey I've got some British pounds here that aren't supposed to be in the country. Since you are going to London on vacation, howabout we swap for American, at about half the British face value?

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Not a gambler? Smart man! Hey I've got some British pounds here that aren't supposed to be in the country. Since you are going to London on vacation, howabout how about we swap for American, at about half the British face value?


* In ''Film/CatchMeIfYouCan,'' [[ConMan Frank Abagnale]] thinks he found an attractive woman willing to take a romp with him only for her to reveal herself as a high-class prostitute. Frankto turns the tables on her, by overpaying her with a phony cashier's check and receives his change in cash, effectively tricking a gorgeous hooker into paying him $400 for a night of testing the hotel's bedsprings. According to Frank Abagnale's book (which was the basis for the movie), this incident ultimately cost him big-time as the hooker gave the FBI a description of him, something they didn't have before then.

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* In ''Film/CatchMeIfYouCan,'' [[ConMan Frank Abagnale]] thinks he found an attractive woman willing to take a romp with him only for her to reveal herself as a high-class prostitute. Frankto Frank turns the tables on her, by overpaying her with a phony cashier's check and receives his change in cash, effectively tricking a gorgeous hooker into paying him $400 for a night of testing the hotel's bedsprings. According to Frank Abagnale's book (which was the basis for the movie), this incident ultimately cost him big-time as the hooker gave the FBI a description of him, something they didn't have before then.

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* On ''Series/{{MASH}}'' Frank buys a string of real pearls for his wife and fakes for Margaret. She cons him into switching them.
* Fed up with Suzanne bragging about her pearls, Mary Jo on ''Series/DesigningWomen'' swaps them out for cheap fakes...then loses the real ones.
* ''Series/WhiteCollar'' plays this trope a lot.


* In ''Film/CatchMeIfYouCan,'' [[ConMan Frank Abagnale]] thinks he found an attractive woman willing to take a romp with him only for her to reveal herself as a high-class prostitute. Frankto turns the tables on her, by overpaying her with a phony cashier's check and receives his change in cash, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome effectively tricking a gorgeous hooker into paying him $400 for a night of testing the hotel's bedsprings.]] According to Frank Abagnale's book (which was the basis for the movie), this incident ultimately cost him big-time as the hooker gave the FBI a description of him, something they didn't have before then.

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* In ''Film/CatchMeIfYouCan,'' [[ConMan Frank Abagnale]] thinks he found an attractive woman willing to take a romp with him only for her to reveal herself as a high-class prostitute. Frankto turns the tables on her, by overpaying her with a phony cashier's check and receives his change in cash, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome effectively tricking a gorgeous hooker into paying him $400 for a night of testing the hotel's bedsprings.]] bedsprings. According to Frank Abagnale's book (which was the basis for the movie), this incident ultimately cost him big-time as the hooker gave the FBI a description of him, something they didn't have before then.


Good For Bad always uses a switch. That is, the bad thing is swapped in for the good thing, without the mark knowing, often using sleight of hand or switching identical bags. The counterfeit money that is being sold looks so good because it ''is'' real money, but it isn't what goes into the bag at the exchange. The "fast" horse twin is the same horse, on drugs. The last time you ever see the real art masterpiece is when you give it over to be replicated.

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Good For Bad always uses a switch. That is, the bad thing is swapped in for the good thing, without the mark knowing, often using sleight of hand or switching identical bags. The counterfeit money that is being sold looks so good because it ''is'' is real money, but it isn't what goes into the bag at the exchange. The "fast" horse twin is the same horse, on drugs. The last time you ever see the real art masterpiece is when you give it over to be replicated.



* ''[[Film/OceansEleven Ocean's Twelve]]'' intended to do this to the Coronation Egg-swap out the real egg for a hologram-before a rival thief, Francois Toulour, beat them to it and won a bet. [[spoiler:The twist was they ''already'' switched the real egg for a fake one while the real one was transported by a nondescript courier.]]
* Played with in the threequel ''Ocean's Thirteen'', where Linus [[spoiler: and his father]] swapped out Willy Bank's Five Diamond awards for fakes, only for Toulour to steal them from him. [[spoiler: He actually stole the fakes. Linus actually was there to plant bombs around the case the diamonds were in to steal the entire case, diamonds and all.]]
* In ''Film/CatchMeIfYouCan,'' [[ConMan Frank Abagnale]] overpays a high-class prostitute with a phony cashier's check and receives his change in cash, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome effectively tricking a gorgeous hooker into paying him $400 for a night of testing the hotel's bedsprings.]]
** Frank avoids getting the JerkAss tag for this because the hooker was not up-front with him about what she was. He thought he had simply found an attractive woman willing to take a romp with him. It wasn't until they were about to... seal the deal that she started negotiating a very steep price for her services. Once Frank caught on that he was effectively being conned himself, he took the opportunity to turn the tables on her.
** According to Frank Abagnale's book (which was the basis for the movie), this incident ultimately cost him big-time as the hooker gave the FBI a description of him, something they didn't have before then.

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* ''[[Film/OceansEleven Ocean's Twelve]]'' ''Film/OceansEleven'':
** ''Ocean's Twelve''
intended to do this to the Coronation Egg-swap out the real egg for a hologram-before a rival thief, Francois Toulour, beat them to it and won a bet. [[spoiler:The twist was they ''already'' already switched the real egg for a fake one while the real one was transported by a nondescript courier.]]
* ** Played with in the threequel ''Ocean's Thirteen'', where Linus [[spoiler: and his father]] swapped out Willy Bank's Five Diamond awards for fakes, only for Toulour to steal them from him. [[spoiler: He actually stole the fakes. Linus actually was there to plant bombs around the case the diamonds were in to steal the entire case, diamonds and all.]]
* In ''Film/CatchMeIfYouCan,'' [[ConMan Frank Abagnale]] overpays thinks he found an attractive woman willing to take a romp with him only for her to reveal herself as a high-class prostitute prostitute. Frankto turns the tables on her, by overpaying her with a phony cashier's check and receives his change in cash, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome effectively tricking a gorgeous hooker into paying him $400 for a night of testing the hotel's bedsprings.]]
** Frank avoids getting the JerkAss tag for this because the hooker was not up-front with him about what she was. He thought he had simply found an attractive woman willing to take a romp with him. It wasn't until they were about to... seal the deal that she started negotiating a very steep price for her services. Once Frank caught on that he was effectively being conned himself, he took the opportunity to turn the tables on her.
**
]] According to Frank Abagnale's book (which was the basis for the movie), this incident ultimately cost him big-time as the hooker gave the FBI a description of him, something they didn't have before then.

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[[folder:Religion]]
* God in [[Literature/BookOfMalachi Malachi 1:14]] from ''Literature/TheBible'' says "cursed be the deceiver who has in his flock a male, and vows, and yet sacrifices to the Lord what is blemished." Basically saying that God does not like people conning Him out of good sacrificial animals by offering a bad one in its place.
[[/folder]]


Good for Bad is a ConMan's {{tale}} that involves arranging a swap of something genuine for something bogus. You give me one dollar of real money for my counterfeit fifty. Better yet, if you have an art masterpiece, I can get you a good replica for your insurance fire.

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Good for Bad is TheTale of a ConMan's {{tale}} ConMan that involves arranging a swap of something genuine for something bogus. You give me one dollar of real money for my counterfeit fifty. Better yet, if you have an art masterpiece, I can get you a good replica for your insurance fire.

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* The pigeon drop is a classic two-person con. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPsvda1XLug Here's one variant]]. The mark is given a chance to split a sudden windfall. They're asked for good faith money to keep them honest, but the con-man swaps the windfall with something worthless. The classic version is finding a wallet or envelope full of money which the conmen offer to share after checking with the cops or asking at some place if anyone lost it. They ask for good faith money and switch the wallet/envelope with one full of paper. They then leave the mark convinced he is holding the cash and make off with the good faith money.


** This scam is thought to be the root of the word "phony" for "fake". The root comes from the Irish word "fáinne"[[labelnote:*]]fawn-ya[[/note]], which means "ring".

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** This scam is thought to be the root of the word "phony" for "fake". The root comes from the Irish word "fáinne"[[labelnote:*]]fawn-ya[[/note]], "fáinne"[[labelnote:*]]fawn-ya[[/labelnote]], which means "ring".


** This scam is thought to be the root of the word "phony" for "fake". The root comes from the Irish word "faínne", which means "ring".

to:

** This scam is thought to be the root of the word "phony" for "fake". The root comes from the Irish word "faínne", "fáinne"[[labelnote:*]]fawn-ya[[/note]], which means "ring".


Good For Bad is a ConMan's {{tale}} that involves arranging a swap of something genuine for something bogus. You give me one dollar of real money for my counterfeit fifty. Better yet, if you have an art masterpiece, I can get you a good replica for your insurance fire.

to:

Good For for Bad is a ConMan's {{tale}} that involves arranging a swap of something genuine for something bogus. You give me one dollar of real money for my counterfeit fifty. Better yet, if you have an art masterpiece, I can get you a good replica for your insurance fire.


* In ''TheRockfordFiles'', Jim Rockford uses one of these to recover a stolen pearl necklace. He uses a fake jeweler to convince the thieves that the necklace they stole was a fake, then convinced them to break back in and switch it for one that actually was fake.
* Series/MissionImpossible does this often.

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* In ''TheRockfordFiles'', ''Series/TheRockfordFiles'', Jim Rockford uses one of these to recover a stolen pearl necklace. He uses a fake jeweler to convince the thieves that the necklace they stole was a fake, then convinced them to break back in and switch it for one that actually was fake.
* Series/MissionImpossible ''Series/MissionImpossible'' does this often.

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