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*** Wailord is supposedly 14.5 meters tall and is presumably the length of a real blue whale, yet its battle model shows it smaller than its trainer. This is obviously so it doesn't take up the whole screen and force the camera to be zoomed ridiculously far out. Some even say that its Dynamax form is how big it really is.

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** Overlapping with PopularityPower, a lot of Servants have rarities or stats that don't correspond to their in-lore power. Arash is FamedInStory as Iran's greatest hero, but he's a one-star, the lowest rarity, [[LethalJokeCharacter and mostly useless at first glance]]. Cu Chulainn, who is considered pretty damn powerful in the lore of the series, is three-star, putting him below people he canonically managed to fight to a standstill or outright defeat. Jack the Ripper is considered a "young" Servant and therefore quite weak, but a five-star in-game, the top rarity. And then there's the large number of Servants given out for special events, who inexplicably gain or lose a star and completely change their focus because they're wearing a bathing suit, and all of whom end up at four or five stars.

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** Alternatively, if you have one of the stealth based subclasses (Jedi Shadow, Sith Assassin, Scoundrel, or Imperial Operative) you cane sneak your way to a boss without killing a ''single'' Mook. NPCs at the end will ''still'' express outrage/fear at you for "killing" everyone on your way in, as if you'd just performed a MookHorrorShow.


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** There's also a point in the Jedi Consular storyline where you have the option to use Force Healing on a defeated enemy, even if you chose Jedi Shadow as your subclass, when healing is solely the province of Jedi Sages.


* The Assassin class in the lore of ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder'' is stated to be the worst physical combatant of the various classes, and best for stealth tactics and picking off specific priority targets who can't overpower them (especially normal humans). However, in the game proper, an Assassin is no weaker than any other Servant of the same star level aside from a 10% damage penalty (which they share with the Caster class). To the contrary, due to the game giving Assassin a TacticalRockPaperScissors advantage over the Rider class, and most giant enemies being Riders, Assassins are somewhat memetic in the fandom for these sneaky rogues, serial killers, and executioners being able to tank the blows of giant monsters and kill them in one shot, while the powerful mages, demigods, and dragon-slayers struggle to do the same.

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* ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder'':
**
The Assassin class in the lore of ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder'' is stated to be the worst physical combatant of the various classes, and best for stealth tactics and picking off specific priority targets who can't overpower them (especially normal humans). However, in the game proper, an Assassin is no weaker than any other Servant of the same star level aside from a 10% damage penalty (which they share with the Caster class). To the contrary, due to the game giving Assassin a TacticalRockPaperScissors advantage over the Rider class, and most giant enemies being Riders, Assassins are somewhat memetic in the fandom for these sneaky rogues, serial killers, and executioners being able to tank the blows of giant monsters and kill them in one shot, while the powerful mages, demigods, and dragon-slayers struggle to do the same.same.
** Due to the game's summoning mechanics, it's very possible to have a character who's a major player in the story mode in your party by the time you reach that point. For instance, say you roll Merlin on a banner or use your friend's Merlin through Supports, and then reach Babylon, where you meet a mysterious mage who helps you out. The characters still act shocked when the mage turns out to be Merlin, even though they've been fighting alongside him for some time and know exactly what he looks like. This was given a bandage by a system where many newer Servants are not referred to by their True Name until you reach their part of the story; for instance, if you haven't played Agartha and you summon or use [[spoiler:Penthesilea]], then the game refers to her primarily as "Berserker of El Dorado" and even blanks out the name of [[LimitBreak her Noble Phantasm]] to avoid making it obvious who she is.


* ''VideoGame/TheSeventhGuest'' and its sequel suffer terribly from this trope, the reason being mainly that the puzzles Henry Stauf set up throughout his mansion make the plot feel disconnected at times because of how hard, long, and sometimes annoying they seem to be. The cutscenes in the first game can become a clever thought puzzle in piecing together the order in which they occurred during that night, but the sequel had no such events, instead having the puzzles separated by arbitrary fetch quests hinted at from riddles Stauf gives you on the electronic [[ChooseYourOwnAdventure Game book]].

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* ''VideoGame/TheSeventhGuest'' and its sequel suffer terribly from this trope, the reason being mainly that the puzzles Henry Stauf set up throughout his mansion make the plot feel disconnected at times because of how hard, long, and sometimes annoying they seem to be. The cutscenes in the first game can become a clever thought puzzle in piecing together the order in which they occurred during that night, but the sequel had no such events, instead having the puzzles separated by arbitrary fetch quests hinted at from riddles Stauf gives you on the electronic [[ChooseYourOwnAdventure Game book]].{{Gamebook|s}}.


* In the ''VideoGame/{{Spore}}'' Galactic Adventures expansion, when playing adventures in the Space stage, they will be assigned to the locations of un-visited planets. It doesn't take into account the habitability of the existing planet before placing an adventure there, so you can have a planet that claims to be a T0 but ends up being a forested world with lots of wildlife when you actually land. Also, occasionally, player-made adventures will do things such as giving a name to the planet you're on, or being part of a series that assumes you've done the previous adventures, but they leave the captain unlocked so you can play them in Space stage where these details no longer make sense.

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* In ''VideoGame/HarvestTown'' features a [[RelationshipValues relationship meter]] which measures how much the ''VideoGame/{{Spore}}'' Galactic Adventures expansion, when playing adventures in other town residents like you. Obviously, everyone's meter start at 0, and would increase if the Space stage, they will be assigned to the locations of un-visited planets. It player give them gifts or complete specific quests for them. But this doesn't take into account the habitability of the existing planet before placing an adventure there, so you can have a planet that claims to be a T0 but ends up being a forested world with lots of wildlife make much sense when you actually land. Also, occasionally, player-made adventures will do things such as giving a name consider that the protagonist grew up in the titular town, and it would seem implausible to imagine that the guy who had only recently moved in the city is equally close to the planet you're on, or being part of a series that assumes you've done the previous adventures, but protagonist as their grandfather's best friend and other {{honorary uncle}}s whom they leave the captain unlocked so you can play them in Space stage where these details no longer make sense.grew up with.



** Carl is a punctual guy and parts of his story explictly happen at precise times according to him, but cutscenes usually have a bracket of at least two hours during which they can be triggered. The time at which they actually happen may hence be in contradiction with his dialogue.

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** Carl is a punctual guy and parts of his story explictly explicitly happen at precise times according to him, but cutscenes usually have a bracket of at least two hours during which they can be triggered. The time at which they actually happen may hence be in contradiction with his dialogue.


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* In the ''VideoGame/{{Spore}}'' Galactic Adventures expansion, when playing adventures in the Space stage, they will be assigned to the locations of un-visited planets. It doesn't take into account the habitability of the existing planet before placing an adventure there, so you can have a planet that claims to be a T0 but ends up being a forested world with lots of wildlife when you actually land. Also, occasionally, player-made adventures will do things such as giving a name to the planet you're on, or being part of a series that assumes you've done the previous adventures, but they leave the captain unlocked so you can play them in Space stage where these details no longer make sense.


* The Assassin class in the lore of ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder'' is stated to be the worst physical combatant of the various classes, and best for stealth tactics and picking off specific priority targets who can't overpower them (especially normal humans). However, in the game proper, an Assassin is no weaker than any other Servant of the same star level. To the contrary, due to the game giving Assassin a TacticalRockPaperScissors advantage over the Rider class, and most giant enemies being Riders, Assassins are somewhat memetic in the fandom for these sneaky rogues, serial killers, and executioners being able to tank the blows of giant monsters and kill them in one shot, while the powerful mages, demigods, and dragon-slayers struggle to do the same.

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* The Assassin class in the lore of ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder'' is stated to be the worst physical combatant of the various classes, and best for stealth tactics and picking off specific priority targets who can't overpower them (especially normal humans). However, in the game proper, an Assassin is no weaker than any other Servant of the same star level.level aside from a 10% damage penalty (which they share with the Caster class). To the contrary, due to the game giving Assassin a TacticalRockPaperScissors advantage over the Rider class, and most giant enemies being Riders, Assassins are somewhat memetic in the fandom for these sneaky rogues, serial killers, and executioners being able to tank the blows of giant monsters and kill them in one shot, while the powerful mages, demigods, and dragon-slayers struggle to do the same.



* ''VideoGame/ChronoCross'' has a feature where in NewGamePlus, you can pull all of the characters you had in your party whenever you had previously beaten the game; even the ones who are in contradictory path. While some might have a special attack or two; they do not interact. (Especially huge is being able to bring [[TheDragon Harle]] back.) Somewhat justified, since the existence of parallel worlds is one of the main story points of the game.

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* ''VideoGame/ChronoCross'' has a feature where in NewGamePlus, you can pull all of the characters you had in your party whenever you had previously beaten the game; even the ones who are in contradictory path.paths. While some might have a special attack or two; they do not interact. (Especially huge is being able to bring [[TheDragon Harle]] back.) Somewhat justified, since the existence of parallel worlds is one of the main story points of the game.


** The quintessential example, and one that was parodied at the time the game came out, is [[spoiler:Aeris' death]]. The game arbitrarily renders the equipment that the character was wearing as impossible to retrieve.[[note]]Yet it gives you back all the equipped materia.[[/note]] It's also never suggested that anyone could try to use a Phoenix Down to revive the character in question. This is despite characters routinely falling in battle, with a 0 HP meter, who can be easily revived with a single use of the object. This is due to the fact that the story relies on [[spoiler:Aeris']] actions from beyond the grave.

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** The quintessential example, and one that was parodied at the time the game came out, is [[spoiler:Aeris' death]]. The game arbitrarily renders the equipment that the character was wearing as impossible to retrieve.[[note]]Yet it gives you back all the equipped materia.[[/note]] It's also never suggested that anyone could try to use a Phoenix Down to revive the character in question. This is despite characters routinely falling in battle, with a 0 HP meter, who can be easily revived with a single use of the object. This is due to the fact that because the story relies on [[spoiler:Aeris']] actions from beyond the grave.


** VideoGame/TheTownWithNoName has the same problem with Wildcard McVee. If you beat him at cards, he'll start to say he wants to duel outside, but then shoot you through the table while he's speaking. There's no clue about this on screen; the only way to survive this is to know in advance that it's going to happen and shoot Wildcard during the speech. This means that in the story, your character beats Wildcard at cards then kills him for no reason.

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** VideoGame/TheTownWithNoName has the same problem with * In VideoGame/TheTownWithNoName, when you beat Wildcard McVee. If you beat him [=McVee=] at cards, he'll start to say he wants to duel outside, but then shoot you through the table while he's speaking. There's no clue about this on screen; the only way to survive this is to know in advance that it's going to happen and shoot Wildcard during the speech. This means that in the story, your character beats Wildcard at cards cards, then kills him for no reason.

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** VideoGame/TheTownWithNoName has the same problem with Wildcard McVee. If you beat him at cards, he'll start to say he wants to duel outside, but then shoot you through the table while he's speaking. There's no clue about this on screen; the only way to survive this is to know in advance that it's going to happen and shoot Wildcard during the speech. This means that in the story, your character beats Wildcard at cards then kills him for no reason.


** In the final chapter of Scenario 013 in ''012'', the boss cutscenes show the Chaos's warriors being challenged and after a battle being defeated by their Cosmos counterparts. Despite this, you can challenge them with any character and you'll still see the cutscenes. In the first game, this was averted; you had to have the character relating to the boss to get both cutscenes, [[TropesAreTools which means you'd have to memorize who's in what chapter and do it multiple times with each character]].

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** In the final chapter of Scenario 013 in ''012'', the boss cutscenes show the Chaos's warriors being challenged and after a battle being defeated by their Cosmos counterparts. Despite this, you can challenge them with any character and you'll still see the cutscenes. In the first game, this was averted; you had to have the character relating to the boss to get both cutscenes, [[TropesAreTools [[Administrivia/TropesAreTools which means you'd have to memorize who's in what chapter and do it multiple times with each character]].

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* The Assassin class in the lore of ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder'' is stated to be the worst physical combatant of the various classes, and best for stealth tactics and picking off specific priority targets who can't overpower them (especially normal humans). However, in the game proper, an Assassin is no weaker than any other Servant of the same star level. To the contrary, due to the game giving Assassin a TacticalRockPaperScissors advantage over the Rider class, and most giant enemies being Riders, Assassins are somewhat memetic in the fandom for these sneaky rogues, serial killers, and executioners being able to tank the blows of giant monsters and kill them in one shot, while the powerful mages, demigods, and dragon-slayers struggle to do the same.

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* In ''VideoGame/CopyKitty'', it's stated that Boki can instantly copy the powers of anything within a thirty meter radius of herself. In-game, however, she has to pick up items dropped by enemies in order to copy their powers, because that makes for better gameplay.


** In ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'', Takumi is said to be about as skilled of a swordsman as he is an archer, to the point at which he defeated Ryoma during a sparring match in their A support. As an Archer, he has no sword proficiency unless he reclasses.

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** In ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'', Takumi is said to be about as skilled of a swordsman as he is an archer, to the point at which he defeated Ryoma during a sparring match in their A support. As an Archer, he has no sword proficiency unless he reclasses. Additionally, he needs an A+ or A support to even use a sword as his base classes are Archer and Pegasus Knight.


* ''GameplayAndStorySegregation/MetalGear''



[[folder:Stealth-Based Game]]
* ''VideoGame/MetalGear'':
** Just about every enemy in the games can be defeated non-lethally, either with your fists or a tranquilizer gun, and yet the bosses will all die in the following cutscene regardless. Similarly, if they're supposed to escape and appear again later, the player can pump dozens of bullets into the boss' head and they will still not be dead in the next cutscene.
** Ocelot in ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 3|SnakeEater}}'' is a normal boss in his boss fight, able to take multiple bullets to the head (though he can't quite be killed). But during the earlier Virtuous Mission, Snake knocks him out in a cutscene. Afterward, it is perfectly possible to kill him while he's lying there, at which point you get a NonStandardGameOver with Col. Campbell berating the player for causing a Time Paradox.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'': Campbell insists that Snake can't shoot Sniper Wolf. Who is in the Communications Tower well within the range of his FAMAS rifle. The one the storyline gives him. Granted, it's not a ''good'' idea to take on a sniper with an assault rifle using iron sights from that range, but it's still possible.
** In the cutscenes of ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 4|GunsOfThePatriots}}'', Snake is in pretty bad shape. He's in pain, suffers seizures, collapses and fumbles about, and can hardly ''stand'' let alone walk. But for those rare occasions you actually get to play, he runs, jumps, climbs, shoots, and does judo with absolutely no problems. Though the cutscenes usually have him taking his medication when his symptoms manifest.
** Likewise, throughout the main ''Ground Zeroes'' mission and the side ops, enemy planes are shown to be ''very'' tough to take down, and require sustained fire for a solid 30-45 seconds or three shots from a rocket launcher to take out. During the ending cutscene, Snake takes out an encroaching enemy chopper with a short burst of gunfire, which causes it to immediately explode and fall to the ground.
** In "Cloaked in Silence", Quiet is shown to take out an encroaching enemy jet fighter with a single, well-timed shot into the cockpit with her sniper rifle. In gameplay (and likely in an attempt to curb her near GameBreaker status), Quiet will always brazenly attempt to shoot an aircraft in the side of its armor instead of the cockpit, leading to their attention being drawn to her and forcing her to find another position.
** Canonically, Quiet's superhuman abilities come as the direct result of [[spoiler:a parasite that was implanted into her to save her life, due to injuries inflicted by Ishmael in the prologue]], at the cost of not being able to wear most clothing. Essentially, wearing a shirt could ''suffocate her''. Yet, towards the end of the game, you can equip Quiet with a pair of outfits (either her [[spoiler:Gray XOF]] fatigues or a [[ContinuityNod Sniper Wolf]] outfit) that are much more conservative and cover her, yet it has no detrimental gameplay effects. More notably, Quiet even starts out in the Sniper Wolf outfit during Mission 40 (Cloaked in Silence [Extreme]).
** Obtaining the Wormhole Fulton (a Side-Op reward that only appears after completion of Mission 31) causes strange oddities with the plot, especially when replaying previous missions. While there are a [[DevelopersForesight wide assortment]] of optional and different codec conversations for doing things in unintended ways, Kaz will still tell you that the Man on Fire "broke free" if you Fulton him during the boss fight in "Voices", even if you use the Wormhole. Likewise, Snake attempts to Fulton the Man on Fire with a standard balloon in the Side-Op where you retrieve his corpse from Yakho Oboo Outpost, even if you have the Wormhole equipped.
** An example caused by the game's tumultuous production happens when you beat the game. After you view the "Truth" cutscene, a number of cassette tapes are deposited in the player's (Venom Snake's) inventory called "Truth Records", which have conversations and admissions that the character had no way of knowing and have nothing to do with Mother Base. Additionally, despite the revelation that [[spoiler:Venom Snake is ''not'' the real Big Boss, which only occurs just before Solid Snake attacks Outer Heaven in the original ''VideoGame/MetalGear'']], all of your soldiers already know this for a fact and seemingly have no problem with it whatsoever. It's unclear if [[spoiler:Miller already knew about the real Big Boss' deception and already told everyone on the base, or if they just found out through other means]].
* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid2'', Venus is revealed to have [[BornLucky luck-based powers]]. These only affect her in the storyline, where she uses them to dowse and repeatedly make a coin come up heads. They also affect her in her boss battle, where she gets a significant bonus to her accuracy compared to Snake. However, when she's a playable character, they don't affect her at all. The cutscenes also show her killing soldiers with shurikens stored in her suit, but in-game she's limited to using [[FightLikeACardPlayer cards]] as weapons just like Snake, even in her boss battle.
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