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* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' has Westerosi [[GoldSilverCopperStandard gold, silver, and copper]] dragons, silver stags, and copper pennies (plus a few more rarely encountered ones, like a copper star, which is worth more than a regular copper penny). When the Targaryen dynasty conquered and united the Seven Kingdoms, they imposed this standardized currency system across the entire continent. Before that, each kingdom used their own local currencies (some of which are still encountered, because they still contain precious metals - such as Hand coins in the Reach, which are only worth about half as much as a gold dragon). Curiously, they used "silver stag" coins even ''before'' the Targaryens were overthrown by the Baratheons (whose sigil is a stag) - possibly because the Baratheons were always a younger branch of the Targaryen family through intermarriage. Unlike many fantasy series, the novels actually take inflation into account: food prices drastically increase during war time. Money values are also different in prequel eras: price numbers are three times ''smaller'' in the Tales of Dunk & Egg era, set 90 years before the main novels (3 gold dragons and change is considered a good price for a horse in the Dunk & Egg era, but ''one'' gold dragon is considered a fair price for a horse in the main novels). George R.R. Martin hasn't worked out all of the specifics, but at least he acknowledges that inflation ''exists'' on a scale of centuries - in contrast with other series in which "a gold coin" is worth the exact same amount across thousands of years.

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* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' has Westerosi [[GoldSilverCopperStandard gold, silver, and copper]] gold dragons, silver stags, and copper pennies pennies]] (plus a few more rarely encountered ones, like a copper star, which is worth more than a regular copper penny). When the Targaryen dynasty conquered and united the Seven Kingdoms, they imposed this standardized currency system across the entire continent. Before that, each kingdom used their own local currencies (some of which are still encountered, because they still contain precious metals - such as Hand coins in the Reach, which are only worth about half as much as a gold dragon). Curiously, they used "silver stag" coins even ''before'' the Targaryens were overthrown by the Baratheons (whose sigil is a stag) - possibly because the Baratheons were always a younger branch of the Targaryen family through intermarriage. Unlike many fantasy series, the novels actually take inflation into account: food prices drastically increase during war time. Money values are also different in prequel eras: price numbers are three times ''smaller'' in the Tales of Dunk & Egg era, set 90 years before the main novels (3 gold dragons and change is considered a good price for a horse in the Dunk & Egg era, but ''one'' gold dragon is considered a fair price for a horse in the main novels). George R.R. Martin hasn't worked out all of the specifics, but at least he acknowledges that inflation ''exists'' on a scale of centuries - in contrast with other series in which "a gold coin" is worth the exact same amount across thousands of years.

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* In ''Literature/LabyrinthsOfEcho'', the national currency of the Unified Kingdom is the crown, divided into a dozen coronets, which in turn are divided into a dozen copper handfuls. Other nations' money is also mentioned, such as the Kumana ounce, the Changaia zot, the Irrashian finny, the Tasher pelli, and so on.


* In ''[[Literature/CityOfBones1995 City of Bones]]'' by Creator/MarthaWells, the city-state of Charisat has a currency system that's restricted to citizens and those who buy an (exorbitant) license. The rest use a Guild-enforced standard of "trade tokens", good for hours or days of an artisan's labour; their disadvantage is that the city can declare them void whenever it wants to get rid of outsiders.
* In ''Literature/TheDarkProfitSaga'', thanks to dwarven alchemists collapsing the gold standard, the preferred currency of the Freedlands is the giltin, available in both gilded coins and banknotes. Silver shillings and pennies are also mentioned.



* In ''Literature/TheDarkProfitSaga'', thanks to dwarven alchemists collapsing the gold standard, the preferred currency of the Freedlands is the giltin, available in both gilded coins and banknotes. Silver shillings and pennies are also mentioned.
* In ''[[Literature/CityOfBones1995 City of Bones]]'' by Creator/MarthaWells, the city-state of Charisat has a currency system that's restricted to citizens and those who buy an (exorbitant) license. The rest use a Guild-enforced standard of "trade tokens", good for hours or days of an artisan's labour; their disadvantage is that the city can declare them void whenever it wants to get rid of outsiders.


* In ''[[Literature/CityOfBones1995 City of Bones]]'' by Creator/MarthaWells, the city-state of Charistat has a currency system that's restricted to citizens and those who buy an (exorbitant) license. The rest use a Guild-enforced standard of "trade tokens", good for hours or days of an artisan's labour; their disadvantage is that the city can declare them void whenever it wants to get rid of outsiders.

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* In ''[[Literature/CityOfBones1995 City of Bones]]'' by Creator/MarthaWells, the city-state of Charistat Charisat has a currency system that's restricted to citizens and those who buy an (exorbitant) license. The rest use a Guild-enforced standard of "trade tokens", good for hours or days of an artisan's labour; their disadvantage is that the city can declare them void whenever it wants to get rid of outsiders.


* In ''City of Bones'' by Creator/MarthaWells, the city-state of Charistat has a currency system that's restricted to citizens and those who buy an (exorbitant) license. The rest use a Guild-enforced standard of "trade tokens", good for hours or days of an artisan's labour; their disadvantage is that the city can declare them void whenever it wants to get rid of outsiders.

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* In ''City ''[[Literature/CityOfBones1995 City of Bones'' Bones]]'' by Creator/MarthaWells, the city-state of Charistat has a currency system that's restricted to citizens and those who buy an (exorbitant) license. The rest use a Guild-enforced standard of "trade tokens", good for hours or days of an artisan's labour; their disadvantage is that the city can declare them void whenever it wants to get rid of outsiders.

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* In ''City of Bones'' by Creator/MarthaWells, the city-state of Charistat has a currency system that's restricted to citizens and those who buy an (exorbitant) license. The rest use a Guild-enforced standard of "trade tokens", good for hours or days of an artisan's labour; their disadvantage is that the city can declare them void whenever it wants to get rid of outsiders.


** The Klingon Empire's currency is the darsek. The Bajorans use a currency called lita, and the Cardassian Union has the lek. The Karemma, part of the Dominion, use dirak, and in the casino run by Martus (an El-Aurian), the currency of choice is the isik. The Gamesters of Triskelion gambled with quatloos. The Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse has added several others, including Tarkaelean notch-rocks, Gorn szeket, and Breen sakto. Humans on the other hand have no currency at all (though this is [[DependingOnTheWriter inconsistently depicted]]).

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** The Klingon Empire's currency is the darsek. The Bajorans use a currency called lita, and the Cardassian Union has the lek. The Karemma, part of the Dominion, use dirak, and in the casino run by Martus (an El-Aurian), the currency of choice is the isik. The Gamesters of Triskelion gambled with quatloos. The Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse ''Literature/StarTrekNovelVerse'' has added several others, including Tarkaelean notch-rocks, Gorn szeket, and Breen sakto. Humans on the other hand have no currency at all (though this is [[DependingOnTheWriter inconsistently depicted]]).


* Generalissimo Takada's monster dollars in Wrestling/{{HUSTLE}}, currency of his monster army.

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* Generalissimo Takada's monster dollars in Wrestling/{{HUSTLE}}, Wrestling/FightingOperaHUSTLE, currency of his monster army.


** The standard currency in the setting is the "sem", a coin that's minted from various metals. People might specify the metal ''à la'' "gold sem" or leave it implicit, much like "two-fifty" could mean $2.50 or $250.00 in context.

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** The standard currency in the setting is the "sem", a coin that's minted from various metals. People might specify the metal ''à la'' "gold sem" or leave it implicit, much like "two-fifty" could mean $2.50 or $250.00 in context.

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* In ''Literature/TheDarkProfitSaga'', thanks to dwarven alchemists collapsing the gold standard, the preferred currency of the Freedlands is the giltin, available in both gilded coins and banknotes. Silver shillings and pennies are also mentioned.


* The Incipisphere in "Webcomic/Homestuck" uses Boondollars, represented by a B crossed by two vertical lines.

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* The Incipisphere in "Webcomic/Homestuck" "Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}" uses Boondollars, represented by a B crossed by two vertical lines.

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* ''Webcomic/{{Unsounded}}'':
** The standard currency in the setting is the "sem", a coin that's minted from various metals. People might specify the metal ''à la'' "gold sem" or leave it implicit, much like "two-fifty" could mean $2.50 or $250.00 in context.
** Cresce is a communist state that abhors money, so citizens who produce beyond their required quotas earn [[http://www.casualvillain.com/Unsounded/comic/ch09/ch09_18.html Labour Points]] instead. These magic coins are keyed to the earner's aura so that they can't be spent by anyone else.


** Speaking of stamps, these handy inventions of Moist von Lipwig served as a ''de facto'' Ankh-Morpork street currency in the interval between ''Discworld/GoingPostal'' and ''Literature/MakingMoney''.

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** Speaking of stamps, these handy inventions of Moist von Lipwig served as a ''de facto'' Ankh-Morpork street currency in the interval between ''Discworld/GoingPostal'' and ''Literature/MakingMoney''.''Discworld/MakingMoney''.

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** Speaking of stamps, these handy inventions of Moist von Lipwig served as a ''de facto'' Ankh-Morpork street currency in the interval between ''Discworld/GoingPostal'' and ''Literature/MakingMoney''.

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* The ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' series uses "G" as its currency. G is generally depicted as gold coins.

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