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* Most games offer some sort of "mystery award" feature, which gives a random award - usually points, feature completions, or even lighting extra balls. If you're having a poor game, it's much more likely to award a lit extra ball -- on the other hand, don't expect more than a small point reward if you're doing well. In multi player games when not in competition mode it may give a player who behind in score better awards.

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* Most games offer some sort of "mystery award" feature, which gives a random award - usually points, feature completions, or even lighting extra balls. If you're having a poor game, it's much more likely to award a lit extra ball -- on the other hand, don't expect more than a small point reward if you're doing well. In multi player games multi-player games, when not in competition mode "competition mode", it may give a player who behind in score better awards.awards to players who are behind.



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* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain'', enemy soldiers will adapt their tactics to counter yours. As you cause enemies trouble without being detected, they will begin to install surveillance cameras, proximity mines, and decoys to trip you up. If you use noise to distract and misdirect enemies, they will start ignoring any strange sounds they hear. If you go for headshots, they will wear sturdier helmets. Going for body shots? Body armor and riot shields. Fultoning enemies away? They will react more quickly and employ sharpshooters to take out any Fulton balloons. Prefer CQC? They'll bring in shotguns. And so on. The player can send soldiers from Mother Base on missions to disrupt the transport of tools used to get the better of you, but the enemies will start using those tools again after a while


* In ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed: [[VideoGame/NeedForSpeedMostWanted Most Wanted]]'', the AI's cars [[Main/RubberBandAI get faster the more races you win, and become slower when you lose one]]. Thus the easiest way to win races is to deliberately lose about every fifth race to keep the competitors' car speeds as low as one wants.

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* In ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed: [[VideoGame/NeedForSpeedMostWanted Most Wanted]]'', the AI's cars [[Main/RubberBandAI [[RubberBandAI get faster the more races you win, and become slower when you lose one]]. Thus the easiest way to win races is to deliberately lose about every fifth race to keep the competitors' car speeds as low as one wants.



* ''VideoGame/GranTurismo 4'' uses "[[BraggingRightsReward A-Spec Points]]" to encourage you to choose slower, less powerful cars to win the race: the more powerful your car is, the smaller your score will be. If, for example, you manage to win against a squad of sleek German machines with a puny little Pontiac Sunfire, you'll win 200 points; but if you win the race with the superpowered Polyphony Formula Gran Turismo, you'll win 1 single point. However, A-Spec points aren't a reliable method of judging difficulty, as the game seems to mainly base the point levels on your car's specs relative to the AI, and it's possible to get easy 200 point races in vehicles such as the Suzuki GSX-R/4, which much less powerful than most supercars but is good handling and very light.

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* ''VideoGame/GranTurismo 4'' uses "[[BraggingRightsReward A-Spec Points]]" to encourage you to choose slower, less powerful cars to win the race: the more powerful your car is, the smaller your score will be. If, for example, you manage to win against a squad of sleek German machines with a puny little Pontiac Sunfire, you'll win 200 points; but if you win the race with the superpowered Polyphony Formula Gran Turismo, you'll win 1 single point. However, A-Spec points aren't a reliable method of judging difficulty, as the game seems to mainly base the point levels on your car's specs relative to the AI, and it's possible to get easy 200 point races in vehicles such as the Suzuki GSX-R/4, which is much less powerful than most supercars but is good handling and very light.



* ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosForNintendo3DSAndWiiU'' borrows from ''VideoGame/KidIcarusUprising'' the system of using currency to increase the single-player mode's difficulty level. The more coins the player wagers before beginning, the more difficult the battles, but the more valuable the prizes for victory. Losing causes the difficulty to be reduced by one half of a level, as well as costing some of the initial wager and a few prizes that had been won. Higher difficulties are required to face the TrueFinalBoss, who takes on more forms depending on the difficulty level.

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* ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' began using this in its later installments.
**
''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosForNintendo3DSAndWiiU'' borrows from ''VideoGame/KidIcarusUprising'' the system of using currency to increase the single-player mode's difficulty level. The more coins the player wagers before beginning, the more difficult the battles, but the more valuable the prizes for victory. Losing causes the difficulty to be reduced by one half of a level, as well as costing some of the initial wager and a few prizes that had been won. Higher difficulties are required to face the TrueFinalBoss, who takes on more forms depending on the difficulty level.
** ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'' will increase the difficulty of Classic Mode based on how well you perform in the previous match. The higher the difficulty gets, the more items you earn and the more points you get upon completion. The difficulty also takes a drop if you lose and pay coins to replay. If you want the reward for beating it on 9.9 difficulty, that means you can never lose a life while doing extremely well on almost every fight.






* ''VideoGame/{{beatmania}} IIDX'' has Step Up mode. First, your current [[KyuAndDanRanks dan rank]] dicatates the initial pool of charts you get to play; the higher your rank, the harder the songs you'll start with. Second, as you clear songs, the the game gives you harder charts to play, while failing songs will decrease the difficulty of charts allowed. To accomodate this feature, Step Up guarantees three stages, even if you fail your first two.

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* ''VideoGame/{{beatmania}} IIDX'' has Step Up mode. First, your current [[KyuAndDanRanks dan rank]] dicatates the initial pool of charts you get to play; the higher your rank, the harder the songs you'll start with. Second, as you clear songs, the the game gives you harder charts to play, while failing songs will decrease the difficulty of charts allowed. To accomodate accommodate this feature, Step Up guarantees three stages, even if you fail your first two.


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* ''[[VideoGame/LegoAdaptationGame Lego Star Wars II]]'', ''Indiana Jones'', and ''Batman'' feature "Adaptive Difficulty" which merely affects the amount of {{Lego}} studs you lose upon death depending on how well you play, which can go up to a very high amount.

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* ''[[VideoGame/LegoAdaptationGame Lego Star Wars II]]'', ''Indiana Jones'', and ''Batman'' feature "Adaptive Difficulty" which merely affects the amount of {{Lego}} Franchise/{{Lego}} studs you lose upon death depending on how well you play, which can go up to a very high amount.


* Games in the ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot'' series will often disable environmental hazards and/or move checkpoints if a player dies too often on one particular obstacle.

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* Games in the ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot'' ''VideoGame/CrashBandicoot'' series will often disable environmental hazards and/or move checkpoints if a player dies too often on one particular obstacle.



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* ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosForNintendo3DSAndWiiU'' borrows from ''VideoGame/KidIcarusUprising'' the system of using currency to increase the single-player mode's difficulty level. The more coins the player wagers before beginning, the more difficult the battles, but the more valuable the prizes for victory. Losing causes the difficulty to be reduced by one half of a level, as well as costing some of the initial wager and a few prizes that had been won. Higher difficulties are required to face the TrueFinalBoss, who takes on more forms depending on the difficulty level.


* In academic institutions, grading "curves" are these; the instructor may adjust the score requirements for each letter grade based on how well their performances are doing, usually if they feel that they were initially too hard on their students.

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* In academic institutions, grading "curves" are these; the instructor may adjust the score requirements for each letter grade based on how well their performances students are doing, usually if they feel that they were initially too hard on their students.

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* In academic institutions, grading "curves" are these; the instructor may adjust the score requirements for each letter grade based on how well their performances are doing, usually if they feel that they were initially too hard on their students.


* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'' scales monsters level to match your party, and then gives them stronger attacks on top of that. This makes ExperiencePoints a kind of industrial waste generated by grinding for junctions, Guardian Forces and crafting materials, which are the real source of power. (On the other hand, it's a boon for a LowLevelRun.)
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyThe4HeroesOfLight'': Once you open up the VeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon, monsters and bosses will keep pace with the party's levels.

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* ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'':
** In the ''20th Anniversary Edition'' of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'', there's a superboss Phrekyos: a summon beast that changes its stats depending on the amount of key words you've gathered (which indicates your progress in the plot and, naturally, your level).
**
''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'' scales monsters level to match your party, and then gives them stronger attacks on top of that. This makes ExperiencePoints a kind of industrial waste generated by grinding for junctions, Guardian Forces and crafting materials, which are the real source of power. (On the other hand, it's a boon for a LowLevelRun.)
* ** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyThe4HeroesOfLight'': Once you open up the VeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon, monsters and bosses will keep pace with the party's levels.


* ''VideoGame/DiabloIII'' allows a player to select a difficulty, which can only be increased by quitting the current game in progress (though players are allowed to decrease it mid-game if they're alone). Regardless of difficulty, enemy levels scale with a player's to always give them a decent amount of XP and challenge for their current level on whatever difficulty they've chosen.

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* ''VideoGame/DiabloIII'' allows a player to select a difficulty, which can only be increased by quitting the current game in progress (though players are allowed to decrease it mid-game if they're alone). Regardless of difficulty, enemy levels scale with a player's to always give them a decent amount of XP and challenge for their current level on whatever difficulty they've chosen.
chosen. However, once you hit the level cap of 70, you start gaining Paragon levels, which enemy difficulty does ''not'' scale to, meaning that unless you raise the difficulty level (if it's not already at Torment XIII, the highest one selectable), enemies can only get easier for you to fight.


* ''VideoGame/RabiRibi'' has two types of boss scaling available. The original type has bosses increase in level the more equipment and stat-raising items you collect (difficult at first, but can lead to a fairly easy endgame), while the alternative type has bosses increase in level based on current story chapter instead (you can steamroll a lot of the bosses early on, but expect a bone-crushing FinalBoss).

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* ''VideoGame/RabiRibi'' has two types of boss scaling available. The original type has bosses increase in level the more equipment and stat-raising items you collect (difficult at first, but can lead to a fairly relatively easy endgame), while the alternative type has bosses increase in level based on current story chapter instead (you can steamroll a lot of the bosses early on, but expect a bone-crushing FinalBoss).


* ''VideoGame/RabiRibi'' has two types of boss scaling available. The original type has bosses increase in level the more equipment and stat-raising items you collect, while the alternative type has bosses increase in level based on current story chapter instead.

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* ''VideoGame/RabiRibi'' has two types of boss scaling available. The original type has bosses increase in level the more equipment and stat-raising items you collect, collect (difficult at first, but can lead to a fairly easy endgame), while the alternative type has bosses increase in level based on current story chapter instead.instead (you can steamroll a lot of the bosses early on, but expect a bone-crushing FinalBoss).


* The ''VideoGame/{{Homeworld}}'' series scales enemy fleets to match yours. However, it doesn't count captured enemy ships. By kiting enemy fleets while your salvage corvettes steal them one-by-one, you can become game-shatteringly overpowerful.

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* The ''VideoGame/{{Homeworld}}'' series scales enemy fleets to match yours. However, it doesn't count captured enemy ships. By kiting enemy fleets while your salvage corvettes steal them one-by-one, you can become game-shatteringly overpowerful.


** In ''Homeworld 2'', capturing ships is no longer practical and enemy fleets scale so heavily in comparison to yours that building more ships makes the game harder, not easier. The strongest tactic is to retire your fleet at the end of a mission -- you can rebuild in a few scant minutes but the enemy will still be helpless.

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** In ''Homeworld 2'', capturing ships is no longer practical and enemy fleets scale so heavily in comparison to yours that building more ships makes the game harder, not easier. The strongest tactic is to retire self-destruct your fleet at the end of a mission -- you can rebuild in a few scant minutes but the enemy will still be helpless.



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* ''VideoGame/CrimzonClover'':
** In the original doujin version, Simple mode is meant to be an "easy" mode, but point-blanking enemies will cause them to drop small stars, and collecting enough of these stars will cause enemies' bullets to move faster.
** This trope is the core of Boost mode in the arcade and ''World Ignition'' versions. When you fill the bomb meter, you automatically enter [[SuperMode Break Mode]] and a timer starts ticking up. The higher the timer goes, the more points you'll earn but the more difficult enemies will get. Dying or firing a bomb will end Break Mode and drop the timer to the last multiple of 30 seconds, putting a pause to the difficulty increase.

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