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Which brings us to another legitimate reason to use the line: to deal with FanDumb. Some fans like to see very specific things happen -- ''e.g.'' a specific {{Ship|ping}}, a happy ending, a focus on a particular character -- and when they don't see it, they fly off the handle. Still others, and even many critics, simply ''don't like'' the common tropes of certain genres, like high fantasy or sci-fi, and complain about the presence of things like soft magic systems, benevolent monarchs, faster-than-light travel, etc that are simply ''staples of that genre'' rather than actual cliches. In such situations, the only thing to tell a reader really ''is'' "don't like, don't read", because criticism of the work along these lines doesn't have anything to do with the quality of the writing. Some fanfic writers have taken to stating in advance which pairings will appear in the work, so nobody who [[DieForOurShip objects to them]] has any excuse to keep reading. In Wiki/ThisVeryWiki, it is outright ''mandatory'' to do this when adding an entry to a FanficRecommendations page, for these same reasons.

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Which brings us to another legitimate reason to use the line: to deal with FanDumb. Some fans like to see very specific things happen -- ''e.g.'' a specific {{Ship|ping}}, a happy ending, a focus on a particular character -- and when they don't see it, they fly off the handle. Still others, and even many critics, simply ''don't like'' the common tropes of certain genres, like high fantasy or sci-fi, and complain about the presence of things like soft magic systems, benevolent monarchs, faster-than-light travel, etc that are simply ''staples of that genre'' rather than actual cliches. In such situations, the only thing to tell a reader really ''is'' "don't like, don't read", because criticism of the work along these lines doesn't have anything to do with the quality of the writing. Some fanfic writers have taken to stating in advance which pairings will appear in the work, so nobody who [[DieForOurShip objects to them]] has any excuse to keep reading. In Wiki/ThisVeryWiki, it is outright ''mandatory'' to do this include such a notice when adding an entry to a FanficRecommendations page, for these the same reasons.


Which brings us to another legitimate reason to use the line: to deal with FanDumb. Some fans like to see very specific things happen -- ''e.g.'' a specific {{Ship|ping}}, a happy ending, a focus on a particular character -- and when they don't see it, they fly off the handle. Still others, and even many critics, simply ''don't like'' the common tropes of certain genres, like high fantasy or sci-fi, and complain about the presence of things like soft magic systems, benevolent monarchs, faster-than-light travel, etc that are simply ''staples of that genre'' rather than actual cliches. In such situations, the only thing to tell a reader really ''is'' "don't like, don't read", because criticism of the work along these lines doesn't have anything to do with the quality of the writing. Some fanfic writers have taken to stating in advance which pairings will appear in the work, so nobody who [[DieForOurShip objects to them]] has any excuse to keep reading.

to:

Which brings us to another legitimate reason to use the line: to deal with FanDumb. Some fans like to see very specific things happen -- ''e.g.'' a specific {{Ship|ping}}, a happy ending, a focus on a particular character -- and when they don't see it, they fly off the handle. Still others, and even many critics, simply ''don't like'' the common tropes of certain genres, like high fantasy or sci-fi, and complain about the presence of things like soft magic systems, benevolent monarchs, faster-than-light travel, etc that are simply ''staples of that genre'' rather than actual cliches. In such situations, the only thing to tell a reader really ''is'' "don't like, don't read", because criticism of the work along these lines doesn't have anything to do with the quality of the writing. Some fanfic writers have taken to stating in advance which pairings will appear in the work, so nobody who [[DieForOurShip objects to them]] has any excuse to keep reading.
reading. In Wiki/ThisVeryWiki, it is outright ''mandatory'' to do this when adding an entry to a FanficRecommendations page, for these same reasons.


* Laurell K. Hamilton gave this line in a DearNegativeReader letter to fans of her ''Literature/AnitaBlake'' series, who complained of increasing [[MarySue Sue-ishness]] of the title character and emphasis on IKEAErotica over an actual plot.

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* Laurell K. Hamilton gave this line in a DearNegativeReader letter to fans of her ''Literature/AnitaBlake'' series, who complained of the increasing [[MarySue Sue-ishness]] powerhouse status of the title character and emphasis on IKEAErotica over an actual plot.


* Given the amount of vitriol the ''Machinima/RedVsBlue'' season he directed got, along with how the follow-ups based on that were not being welcomed [[TaintedByThePreview based on a trailer alone]], Torrian Crawford [[DearNegativeReader lashed out the fanbase]] [[https://twitter.com/AnimatedTorrii/status/1414719976649408512 with "Stop watching the fucking show."]] [[https://www.reddit.com/r/RedvsBlue/comments/ojbhyh/torrians_comment_regarding_the_red_vs_blue_fanbase/ The fandom didn't take it kindly.]]

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* Given the amount of vitriol the ''Machinima/RedVsBlue'' season he directed got, along with how the follow-ups based on that were not being welcomed [[TaintedByThePreview based on a trailer alone]], Torrian Crawford [[DearNegativeReader lashed out the fanbase]] [[https://twitter.com/AnimatedTorrii/status/1414719976649408512 with "Stop watching the fucking show."]] [[https://www.reddit.com/r/RedvsBlue/comments/ojbhyh/torrians_comment_regarding_the_red_vs_blue_fanbase/ The fandom didn't take it kindly.]]]] However, this is arguably not an example of the trope; in context, Torrian's comment was explicitly targeting toxic harassment levelled at creators and saying that ''open vitriol on cast and crew members' personal accounts,'' not general fan criticism in appropriate venues, should be cut from the community.


Which brings us to another legitimate reason to use the line: to deal with FanDumb. Some fans like to see very specific things happen -- ''e.g.'' a specific {{Ship|ping}}, a happy ending, a focus on a particular character -- and when they don't see it, they fly off the handle. In such situations, the only thing to tell a reader really ''is'' "don't like, don't read", because criticism of the work along these lines doesn't have anything to do with the quality of the writing. Fanfic writers have taken to stating in advance which pairings will appear in the work, so nobody who [[DieForOurShip objects to them]] has any excuse to keep reading.

Sometimes the line is said in response to readers who seem to be forcing themselves to read or watch something they don't enjoy just so that they can keep criticising it. When the work is put up in installments, ''especially'' if it's free, it costs nothing to quit while you're ahead. It can seem remarkably petty to keep reading a LongRunner you hate just to criticise it. But this doesn't make constructive criticism valid on its own, so it cuts both ways.

to:

Which brings us to another legitimate reason to use the line: to deal with FanDumb. Some fans like to see very specific things happen -- ''e.g.'' a specific {{Ship|ping}}, a happy ending, a focus on a particular character -- and when they don't see it, they fly off the handle. Still others, and even many critics, simply ''don't like'' the common tropes of certain genres, like high fantasy or sci-fi, and complain about the presence of things like soft magic systems, benevolent monarchs, faster-than-light travel, etc that are simply ''staples of that genre'' rather than actual cliches. In such situations, the only thing to tell a reader really ''is'' "don't like, don't read", because criticism of the work along these lines doesn't have anything to do with the quality of the writing. Fanfic Some fanfic writers have taken to stating in advance which pairings will appear in the work, so nobody who [[DieForOurShip objects to them]] has any excuse to keep reading.

Sometimes the line is said in response to readers who seem to be forcing themselves to read or watch something they don't enjoy just so that they can keep criticising it.criticizing it, such as fanfic readers who leave entirely negative feedback on multiple subsequent chapters. When the work is put up in installments, ''especially'' if it's free, it costs nothing to quit while you're ahead. It can seem remarkably petty to keep reading a LongRunner you hate just to criticise criticize it. But this doesn't make constructive criticism valid invalid on its own, so it cuts both ways.
ways. At the same time, many FanFiction writers point out that their writing is a ''hobby,'' and view unsolicited constructive criticism as incredibly rude due to the fact that this is something they're doing for fun and for free rather than a product for which they are accountable to their audience.


* Jim Sterling of WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} points out the illogic of complaining about how the [[ThatOneLevel Water Temple]] from ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'', which was made easier in ''Master Quest'', was restored to its original tough layout for the [=3DS=] version -- nothing was stopping you from just hanging on to ''Master Quest'' and continuing to play that. He was similarly befuddled by complaints about ''Zelda'' games [[ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontWatch before they even came out]].

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* Jim Sterling of WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} points out the illogic of complaining about how the [[ThatOneLevel Water Temple]] from ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'', which was made easier in ''Master Quest'', was restored to its original tough layout for the [=3DS=] version -- nothing was stopping you from just hanging on to ''Master Quest'' and continuing to play that. He was They were similarly befuddled by complaints about ''Zelda'' games [[ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontWatch before they even came out]].


* ''[[Film/{{Transformers}} Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen]]'' demonstrated the problem with responding like this to professional reviewers, as fans will point to the film's CriticalDissonance; clearly, only the ''critics'' don't like it, so their opinions are meaningless and they shouldn't watch it. The problem is that they get paid to watch it, whether they particularly want to or not.

to:

* ''[[Film/{{Transformers}} Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen]]'' ''Film/TransformersRevengeOfTheFallen'' demonstrated the problem with responding like this to professional reviewers, as fans will point to the film's CriticalDissonance; clearly, only the ''critics'' don't like it, so their opinions are meaningless and they shouldn't watch it. The problem is that they get paid to watch it, whether they particularly want to or not.


Added DiffLines:

* Given the amount of vitriol the ''Machinima/RedVsBlue'' season he directed got, along with how the follow-ups based on that were not being welcomed [[TaintedByThePreview based on a trailer alone]], Torrian Crawford [[DearNegativeReader lashed out the fanbase]] [[https://twitter.com/AnimatedTorrii/status/1414719976649408512 with "Stop watching the fucking show."]] [[https://www.reddit.com/r/RedvsBlue/comments/ojbhyh/torrians_comment_regarding_the_red_vs_blue_fanbase/ The fandom didn't take it kindly.]]


The trope is most commonly used by FanFic authors who CantTakeCriticism and try to silence critics with this line (as part of a trifecta with LetsSeeYouDoBetter and YoureJustJealous). When "don't like, don't read" is used this way, the problem is immediately obvious: how is the audience supposed to know they don't like it if they haven't read it? The alternative would presumably be for the critic to not read the work and [[ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontWatch complain about it anyway]]. And a reader doesn't necessarily have to enjoy everything they read, especially if they think they can provide ConstructiveCriticism that will make the author's future work better, they find it SoBadItsGood, or they can derive money or laughs by being a CausticCritic. And [[AudienceAlienatingPremise just because you don't like the premise]] doesn't mean that you can't overlook that bias and comment on how well executed the work is. It's not as if professional critics can just read/watch media that they will probably enjoy, weakening this line of attack. Expect to see this as a response to any criticism in a comment section for the work, especially on Website/YouTube (where the work may be so short that it's already over by the time the viewer decides they didn't like it).

That said, Administrivia/TropesAreTools, and there are legitimate reasons to use this line. Not everything [[MultipleDemographicAppeal has to cast a wide net]] and nothing will be to everyone's taste, and if the author is up-front about some of the things in the work ''before'' it starts, they can indicate to the audience that they might encounter something in it that they won't like. This is actually helpful to certain readers, given that it's impossible to "unread" something (as much as people [[BrainBleach would really like to]]). It's particularly useful for DarkFic and the like as a sort of {{Content Warning|s}}. It's also useful to warn people of spoilers if they haven't finished the parent work yet. That said, many fanfic writers' headings don't warn of what's actually in the fic because they suck at summaries.

While many FanFic authors have issues with assessing their own talent, fans can be equally stupid. "Don't like, don't read" serves as a standard warning for fans who only like to see very specific things happen: their favorite ship becoming canon, their favorite character getting a lot of focus, the original plot getting resolved happily, etc. This leads to some people hopping into the review section to proclaim that the story is crap because, say, [[DieForOurShip Alice ended up with Chuck instead of Bob]], when the summary clearly noted it would be an Alice/Chuck story. In such situations, the only thing to tell such a reader really ''is'' "don't like, don't read", since such criticism doesn't have anything to do with the quality of the writing. Other times, the work is put up in free installments, so it costs nothing to quit while you're ahead, and it can seem remarkably petty to keep forcing yourself to read a LongRunner just to criticize it. (That said, this doesn't make constructive criticism less valid on its own, so it cuts both ways.)

to:

The trope is most commonly used by FanFic authors who CantTakeCriticism and try to silence critics with this line (as part of a trifecta with LetsSeeYouDoBetter and YoureJustJealous). When "don't like, don't read" is used this way, the problem is immediately obvious: how is the audience supposed to know they don't like it if they haven't read it? The alternative would presumably be for the critic to not read the work and [[ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontWatch complain about it anyway]]. And a It's also often seen in comment sections on places like Website/YouTube, where the work may be so short that by the time the viewer decides they didn't like it, it's already over.

A
reader doesn't necessarily have to enjoy everything they read, especially if they think they can read. They might be able to provide ConstructiveCriticism in an effort to allow the author to improve their work in the future. They might be a professional critic who doesn't have a ''choice'' in what they read or watch; no good critic is going to limit their reviews to things they think they will enjoy. They might even be seeking out things that will make the author's future work better, they find it SoBadItsGood, or they can derive money or laughs by being don't like, because that allows them to build a persona as a CausticCritic. And [[AudienceAlienatingPremise just Or they might actually like it, but only because you it's SoBadItsGood. "Don't like, don't like the premise]] doesn't mean that you can't overlook that bias and comment on how well executed the work is. It's read" is thus not as if professional critics can just read/watch media that they will probably enjoy, weakening this line of attack. Expect to see this as a response to any particularly useful criticism in a comment section for the work, especially on Website/YouTube (where the work may be so short that it's already over by the time the viewer decides they didn't like it).

here.

That said, Administrivia/TropesAreTools, and there are legitimate reasons to use this line. Not everything No work can be [[MultipleDemographicAppeal has all things to cast a wide net]] all people]], and nothing will be to everyone's taste, and if the line allows the author is to be up-front about some of the things what's in the work ''before'' it starts, work. This allows readers to know, even before they can indicate to the audience start reading, that they might encounter something in it that they won't like. This is actually When used most productively, it can serve as more of a {{Content Warning|s}} than an admonition. It's helpful to for certain readers, given that it's impossible to "unread" something (as much as people [[BrainBleach would really like to]]). It's particularly useful for DarkFic and the things like as a sort of {{Content Warning|s}}.DarkFic, which provides an unexpected and often disturbing twist to something people will be familiar with, which is definitely not to everyone's taste. It's also useful to warn people of spoilers if they haven't finished the parent work yet. That said, many fanfic writers' headings don't warn of what's actually in the fic because they suck at summaries.

While many FanFic authors have issues with assessing
More often, though, FanFiction writers will drop this line to fend off their own talent, fandom's interminable ShipToShipCombat.

Which brings us to another legitimate reason to use the line: to deal with FanDumb. Some
fans can be equally stupid. "Don't like, don't read" serves as a standard warning for fans who only like to see very specific things happen: their favorite ship becoming canon, their favorite happen -- ''e.g.'' a specific {{Ship|ping}}, a happy ending, a focus on a particular character getting a lot of focus, the original plot getting resolved happily, etc. This leads to some people hopping into the review section to proclaim that the story is crap because, say, [[DieForOurShip Alice ended up with Chuck instead of Bob]], -- and when they don't see it, they fly off the summary clearly noted it would be an Alice/Chuck story. handle. In such situations, the only thing to tell such a reader really ''is'' "don't like, don't read", since such because criticism of the work along these lines doesn't have anything to do with the quality of the writing. Other times, Fanfic writers have taken to stating in advance which pairings will appear in the work, so nobody who [[DieForOurShip objects to them]] has any excuse to keep reading.

Sometimes the line is said in response to readers who seem to be forcing themselves to read or watch something they don't enjoy just so that they can keep criticising it. When
the work is put up in free installments, so ''especially'' if it's free, it costs nothing to quit while you're ahead, and it ahead. It can seem remarkably petty to keep forcing yourself to read reading a LongRunner you hate just to criticize criticise it. (That said, But this doesn't make constructive criticism less valid on its own, so it cuts both ways.)
ways.



--> "Sometimes [[TakeThatAudience some children]] get the wrong idea, so I guess I'll explain. It's not the reader's right to change the story of a work. Their only right is to choose whether or not to read it. If they can't stomach it, they should stop reading.

to:

--> "Sometimes [[TakeThatAudience some children]] get the wrong idea, so I guess I'll explain. It's not the reader's right to change the story of a work. Their only right is to choose whether or not to read it. If they can't stomach it, they should stop reading."



* Comic books, especially the mainstream titles from Creator/{{Marvel|Comics}} and Creator/{{DC|Comics}}, are part of a peculiar phenomenon where fans routinely complain about comics they don't like but buy them anyway because they want the complete collection. They thus feel particularly entitled to complain about them, because if they're buying them one way or another, they would rather like them to be worth reading. Comic writers hit back with MortonsFork: if the fans don't like it, they shouldn't buy it (which, if nothing else, will incentivize writers to actually make all their comics worth reading), but if the fans don't buy it, [[ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontWatch they don't have the right to criticize it anyway]]. Creator/KellySueDeConnick once went on to say "If you don't like my politics, don't buy my books."

to:

* Comic books, especially the mainstream titles from Creator/{{Marvel|Comics}} and Creator/{{DC|Comics}}, are part of a peculiar phenomenon where fans routinely complain about comics they don't like like, but buy them anyway because they want the complete collection. They thus feel particularly entitled to complain about them, because if they're buying them one way or another, they would rather like them to be worth reading. Comic writers hit back with MortonsFork: if you buy it, you can't criticise it because the fans don't like it, they shouldn't buy it (which, if nothing else, will incentivize best way to incentivise writers to actually make all their comics worth reading), improve is to withhold your money, but if the fans don't you ''don't'' buy it, you ''still'' can't criticise it because [[ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontWatch they don't have the right to criticize it anyway]]. you haven't read it]]!
*
Creator/KellySueDeConnick once went on to say put it more succinctly when she said, "If you don't like my politics, don't buy my books."



* FanFiction is notorious for authors who use this excuse as a way of deflecting [[CantTakeCriticism any and all criticism of their work]], essentially implying that coherent writing, characterizing, and [[RougeAnglesOfSatin spelling]] are just a matter of personal taste. That said, it's also common to use the line as part of a FanficHeader warning readers of what they may expect to find in the fic (often due to experiences of readers reading their fics and then complaining about pairings or other story elements they personally dislike):

to:

* FanFiction is notorious for authors who use this excuse as a way of deflecting [[CantTakeCriticism any and all criticism of their work]], essentially implying that coherent writing, characterizing, characterization, and [[RougeAnglesOfSatin spelling]] are just a matter of personal taste. That said, given how often readers complain about things like pairings and other story elements, it's also common to use the line as part of a FanficHeader warning readers of about what they may can expect to find in the fic (often due to experiences of readers reading their fics and then complaining about pairings or other story elements they personally dislike):find:



** Website/ArchiveOfOurOwn supplements this with an elaborate {{Content Warning|s}} system that requires writers to warn readers of certain objectionable plot points ([[ViolenceIsDisturbing Graphic violence]], [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil rape]], [[KilledOffForReal major character death]], or [[HormoneAddledTeenager any sexual relationship involving minors]]), or else specifically indicate that they're choosing not to tag offensive content, and also allows writers to tag anything else they think the readers will want to know, i.e. major characters and pairings or other major plot elements (which can sometimes get out of hand as it can turn into tagging everything of any significance[[note]]some short fics have tags so extensive that the tags basically summarize them in their entirety[[/note]], but that's another matter and is not required or even encouraged). This version of the trope is sometimes summed up by the tag "[[Series/ArrestedDevelopment Dead Dove, Do Not Eat]]", which basically means "you know what you're getting into if you read this".

to:

** Website/ArchiveOfOurOwn supplements this with an elaborate {{Content Warning|s}} system that requires writers to warn readers of pretty much anything. They can warn of certain pairings or focus on certain characters. They can warn of certain objectionable plot points ([[ViolenceIsDisturbing Graphic (''e.g.'' [[ViolenceIsDisturbing graphic violence]], [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil rape]], [[KilledOffForReal major character death]], or [[HormoneAddledTeenager any sexual relationship involving minors]]), or else specifically indicate that they're choosing not to tag offensive content, and also allows writers to tag anything else they think the readers will want to know, i.e. major characters and pairings or other major minors]]). They can list any plot elements (which can sometimes get out of hand as it can turn into tagging everything of any significance[[note]]some the readers might not like, which leads some short fics to have tags so extensive that the tags they basically summarize them summarise the fic in their entirety[[/note]], but that's another matter and is not required or its entirety. They can even encouraged). This version of the trope is sometimes use a tag saying they won't tag anything ''specific'', basically meaning "read at your own risk", occasionally summed up by {{memetic|Mutation}}ally with the tag phrase "[[Series/ArrestedDevelopment Dead Dove, Do Not Eat]]", Eat]]"[[note]]to which basically means "you the standard response is, "I don't know what you're getting into if you read this". I expected."[[/note]]



* ''Fanfic/MyInnerLife'', a ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' fanfic that's supposedly an account of the author's lucid dreams, begins with an "Author's Note" which is really a multi-page AuthorTract that amounts to repeatedly throwing this excuse at anyone who questioned whether writing all that down was such a good idea.

to:

* ''Fanfic/MyInnerLife'', a ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' fanfic that's supposedly an account of the author's lucid dreams, begins with an "Author's Note" which is really a multi-page AuthorTract that amounts to AuthorTract, consisting mostly of repeatedly throwing this excuse at anyone any readers who questioned may be questioning whether writing all that down was such a good idea.



* Whenever Raven snaps at the "prepz" criticising ''Fanfic/MyImmortal'', it's full of this, to the point of interrupting her story with [[WordOfGod author notes]] whenever there is a ShoutOut to say that if whoever is reading doesn't understand the reference, why are they still reading? They'll only bitch about how terrible they think her story is.

to:

* Whenever Raven snaps ''Fanfic/MyImmortal'''s writer Tara has a tendency to do this when snapping at the "prepz" criticising ''Fanfic/MyImmortal'', it's full of this, who criticise the story. It gets to the point of interrupting her that every time she makes a ShoutOut, she interrupts the story with [[WordOfGod author notes]] whenever there is a ShoutOut [[AuthorTract series of "author's notes"]] to say that if whoever is reading yell at anyone who doesn't understand get the reference, why are they reference and yet is still reading? They'll reading, ostensibly because they're only there to bitch about how terrible they think her story is.the story's quality.



* When the ''Star Trek'' [[Film/StarTrek2009 reboot movie]] was released, producer Creator/JJAbrams flat-out told ''Franchise/StarTrek'' fans that it would make things more accessible to non-fans, they [[ItsPopularNowItSucks probably weren't going to like it]], and they probably shouldn't watch it.
* ''[[Film/{{Transformers}} Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen]]'' demonstrated the problem with responding like this to professional reviewers, as fans will point to the film's CriticalDissonance as meaning that it's just not to critics' taste and they thus shouldn't watch it. The problem is that they get paid to watch it, whether they particularly want to or not.

to:

* When the ''Star Trek'' [[Film/StarTrek2009 reboot movie]] was released, producer Creator/JJAbrams flat-out told ''Franchise/StarTrek'' fans that it would make things more accessible to non-fans, they and the die-hards [[ItsPopularNowItSucks probably weren't going to like it]], it]] and they probably shouldn't watch it.
* ''[[Film/{{Transformers}} Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen]]'' demonstrated the problem with responding like this to professional reviewers, as fans will point to the film's CriticalDissonance as meaning that it's just not to critics' taste CriticalDissonance; clearly, only the ''critics'' don't like it, so their opinions are meaningless and they thus shouldn't watch it. The problem is that they get paid to watch it, whether they particularly want to or not.



* In an interview promoting ''Series/{{Preacher|2016}}'', Joseph Gilgun was asked to address the show's possibly offensive nature towards Christians. Gilgun's response was to say "fuck them" and to not watch the show if they think it won't be nice to their religion.

to:

* In an interview promoting ''Series/{{Preacher|2016}}'', Joseph Gilgun was asked to address the show's possibly offensive nature towards Christians. Gilgun's response was to say "fuck them" and to not that they shouldn't watch the show if they think it won't be nice to their religion.



* From [[http://lileks.com/institute/comicsins/comics/milquetoast/15.html Casper Milquetoast]]: "While wading through the second installment of a tiresome serial, Mr. Milquetoast suddenly realizes that there is no town, state, or federal law compelling him to finish it."

to:

* From [[http://lileks.com/institute/comicsins/comics/milquetoast/15.html Casper Milquetoast]]: "While Milquetoast]]:
-->"While
wading through the second installment of a tiresome serial, Mr. Milquetoast suddenly realizes that there is no town, state, or federal law compelling him to finish it."



* Wrestling/RomanReigns is without question the most unpopular [[{{Face}} babyface wrestler]] of all time, even winning ''Pro Wrestling Illustrated'''s "Most Hated Wrestler of the Year" award despite that being almost exclusively reserved for [[{{Heel}} the bad guys]]. Wrestling fans [[XPacHeat booed him relentlessly]] and begged for him to go. The executives, though, audaciously declared there to be NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity and that if the fans ''really'' hated him, they wouldn't even bother to turn up and boo him. It's as if they expected the fans already there to universally just remain silent -- which ''would'' send quite a message, but it's completely implausible to expect thousands of fans to spontaneously decide to do that.

to:

* Wrestling/RomanReigns is without question the most unpopular [[{{Face}} babyface wrestler]] of all time, even winning ''Pro Wrestling Illustrated'''s "Most Hated Wrestler of the Year" award despite that being almost exclusively reserved for [[{{Heel}} the bad guys]]. Wrestling fans [[XPacHeat booed him relentlessly]] and begged for him to go. The executives, though, audaciously declared there to be NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity and that if the fans ''really'' hated him, they wouldn't even bother to turn up and boo him. It's as if they expected the fans already there to universally him; they'd just remain silent -- which not buy tickets, or just stay completely silent. That ''would'' send quite a message, but it's completely implausible to expect thousands of fans to spontaneously decide to do that.



* Video game fans tend to complain about optional DownloadableContent, to which they're told just not to buy it if they don't like it. That would work if that were the sole problem, but the content is also taking up space on the disk that could be used to make the game they ''do'' like better, or else should have been part of the main game to begin with. Like with microtransactions below, some cash-in DLC (such as the demon/persona DLC where you pay money for a single demon or persona and no additional content that, in some cases, [[VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIV are heavily involved with the story]], and are generally omnipresent in {{Creator/Atlus}} games) have a negative effect on the overall game, regardless of whether you buy it or not.
* Publishers and developers try to justify the inclusion of {{microtransactions}} on the grounds that they are "providing player choice" and "optional" that fans don't have to buy. However, some pundits like [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]] have pointed out that the inclusion of microtransactions would alter game progression that causes players to either buy them or endure an unrewarding grind, thereby making player agency seem meaningless.

to:

* Video game fans tend to complain about optional DownloadableContent, to which they're told just not to buy it if they don't like it. That would work if that were the sole problem, but the content is also taking up space on the disk that could be used to make the game they ''do'' like better, or else better. In other cases, they're not complaining about the content itself, but the fact that they have to pay for it when it should have been part of the main game to begin with. Like all along (a particular issue with microtransactions below, some cash-in DLC (such as Creator/{{Atlus}} games), meaning that even if you didn't buy it, you're left feeling like the demon/persona DLC where you pay money for a single demon or persona and no additional content that, in some cases, [[VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIV are heavily involved with the story]], and are generally omnipresent in {{Creator/Atlus}} games) have a negative effect on the overall game, regardless of whether you buy it or not.
game is incomplete.
* Publishers and developers try to justify the inclusion of {{microtransactions}} on the grounds that they are "providing player choice" and "optional" that fans don't have to buy. buy if they don't want to. However, some pundits like [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]] have pointed out that the inclusion of microtransactions would alter alters game progression that causes progression; players are forced to either buy them pay up or endure an [[LevelGrinding unrewarding grind, thereby making grind]], which makes player agency seem meaningless.



* Invoked by the developers of ''VideoGame/SpecOpsTheLine'', which forces the player character to commit war crimes. The game was written in such a way as to encourage the player to quit in disgust at that point. Those who continued playing were [[YouBastard reminded of how horrible they're being]], which they didn't appreciate; when they complained, the game effectively told them, "don't like, don't play." It didn't resonate well with fans who just wanted to play the whole game they paid for only to be told the best way to play was [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption to give up halfway through]]. As for the plotline itself, lead writer Walt Williams was much more responsive to criticism.

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* Invoked by the developers of ''VideoGame/SpecOpsTheLine'', which forces the player character to commit war crimes. The game was is written in such a way as to encourage the player to quit in disgust at that point. Those who continued playing were [[YouBastard reminded of how horrible they're being]], which they didn't appreciate; when they complained, the game effectively told them, "don't like, don't play." It didn't resonate well with fans who just wanted to play the whole game they paid for for, only to be told the best way to play was [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption to give up halfway through]]. As for the plotline itself, lead writer Walt Williams was much more responsive to criticism.



* This happens on the ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' forums all the time. Generally, it follows a pretty recognizable pattern. First, someone will complain about a play style or technique they don't like and demand that Notch overhaul the game mechanics so that said play style no longer works (or more cynically, to cater to their own preferences). Then, other players who either use that play style, or have realistic expectations about the amount of attention Notch is paying people who are complaining about how people arrange dirt, come along and invoke this trope, pointing out that in single-player games, it's not actually affecting other people, and in multiplayer servers, it's considered bad form to destroy other peoples' creations, so the best they can suggest is finding or creating a server where those playstyles are disallowed by HouseRules. Sometimes it stops there, but if the original poster and their supporters are feeling ornery, ''they'll'' come back and invoke this trope right back, claiming that if you don't agree with the OP, ''you'' can go make your own server.

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* This happens on the ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' forums all the time. Generally, it follows has issues with players who don't like a pretty recognizable pattern. First, someone will complain about a certain play style or technique they don't like and demand that Notch overhaul the game entire game's mechanics so that said play style no longer works (or more cynically, to cater to fit their own preferences). Then, other players who either use that play style, or tastes. The response "don't like, don't play" is very apt here, because they don't have realistic expectations to worry about the amount of attention Notch is paying people who are complaining about how people arrange dirt, come along and invoke this trope, pointing out that at all in single-player games, it's not actually affecting other people, single-player, and in you're free to [[StartMyOwn set up a multiplayer servers, server]] with HouseRules disallowing that particular technique or play style (especially because it's considered bad form to destroy other peoples' creations, so the best they can suggest is finding or creating a server where those playstyles are disallowed by HouseRules. people's creations). Sometimes it stops there, but if the original poster and their supporters are complainer is feeling particularly ornery, ''they'll'' come back and invoke this trope right back, claiming they'll demand that if you don't agree with the OP, ''you'' can go make your ''everyone else'' form their own server.



* "Accept it or don't buy the game" has been EA's catch cry for ''VideoGame/BattlefieldV'' towards anyone who didn't like the [[PoliticallyCorrectHistory creative direction]] that the game was going in. This strategy backfired on them, as the game was considered a failure in sales by EAs standards.

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* "Accept it or don't buy the game" has been EA's catch cry for ''VideoGame/BattlefieldV'' towards anyone who didn't like the [[PoliticallyCorrectHistory creative direction]] that the game was going in. This strategy backfired on them, as the game was considered a failure in failed to meet EA's sales by EAs standards.targets.



* On WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd website, people frequently come into unrelated videos (such as "Board James") and bash them because they aren't AVGN. This usually attracts at least one or two comments saying, "Just don't watch the non AVGN-videos."

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* On WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd website, people frequently come into unrelated videos (such as "Board James") and bash them because they aren't AVGN. This usually attracts at least one or two comments saying, "Just saying that they don't ''have'' to watch the non AVGN-videos."non-AVGN videos.



* Said in-universe by WebVideo/ScottTheWoz's therapist in the ''VideoGame/ChibiRobo Zip Lash'' episode; he's saying that Scott shouldn't play the game if he hates it so much. Scott retaliates by asking how would he know that he hates the game if he's never played it to begin with.

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* Said in-universe InUniverse by WebVideo/ScottTheWoz's therapist in the ''VideoGame/ChibiRobo Zip Lash'' episode; he's saying that Scott shouldn't play the game if he hates it so much. Scott retaliates by asking how would he know that he hates the game if he's never played it to begin with.



* Challenges like UsefulNotes/NaNoWriMo, which are based on quantity over quality, are occasionally criticized for their quality nonetheless; "don't like, don't read" is basically the only rational response to these people. The fiercest users of this trope are the community members at the ''Daily Grind'', a comic-drawing contest that demands a 2+ panel comic every weekday with the prize going to the artist who lasts the longest without missing an update; some commenters will pressure artists whose work they don't like into dropping out so that someone more "deserving" will win, completely missing the point of the contest.

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* Challenges Entries in challenges like UsefulNotes/NaNoWriMo, which are based on quantity over quality, are occasionally criticized for their quality nonetheless; "don't like, don't read" is basically the only rational response to these people. The fiercest users of this trope are the community members at the ''Daily Grind'', a comic-drawing contest that demands a 2+ panel comic every weekday with the prize going to the artist who lasts the longest without missing an update; some commenters will pressure artists whose work they don't like into dropping out so that someone more "deserving" will win, completely missing the point of the contest.



-->'''Monkian:''' Oh, Cheetara thinks she's so great, but she's totally not.
-->'''Vultureman:''' Ah, you know, you don't have to watch her videos.
-->'''Monkian:''' But then what will I complain about?!

to:

-->'''Monkian:''' Oh, Cheetara thinks she's so great, but she's totally not.
-->'''Vultureman:'''
not.\\
'''Vultureman:'''
Ah, you know, you don't have to watch her videos.
-->'''Monkian:'''
videos.\\
'''Monkian:'''
But then what will I complain about?!


* The episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2021}}'' that introduces Shanks had him note that if the crew (and by extension the audience) didn't like that he was replacing the much beloved Captain Murphy[[note]]which was necessary to keep the show going due to the [[AuthorExistenceFailure death]] of Murphy's voice actor[[/note]], they can go watch anime instead.

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* The episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2021}}'' that introduces Shanks had him note that if the crew (and by extension the audience) didn't like that he was replacing the much beloved Captain Murphy[[note]]which was necessary to keep the show going due to the [[AuthorExistenceFailure death]] death of Murphy's voice actor[[/note]], they can go watch anime instead.


* Similar to the JKR example, when someone on Twitter said they'd switched off ''Series/GoodOmens'' as soon as they saw Adam and Eve were black, Creator/NeilGaiman commented that if they had a problem with that, they ''really'' wouldn't have liked anything that followed, so it was probably just as well.

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* Similar to the JKR example, when When someone on Twitter said they'd switched off ''Series/GoodOmens'' as soon as they saw Adam and Eve were black, Creator/NeilGaiman commented that if they had a problem with that, they ''really'' wouldn't have liked anything that followed, so it was probably just as well.

Added DiffLines:

* Similar to the JKR example, when someone on Twitter said they'd switched off ''Series/GoodOmens'' as soon as they saw Adam and Eve were black, Creator/NeilGaiman commented that if they had a problem with that, they ''really'' wouldn't have liked anything that followed, so it was probably just as well.


* Comic books, especially the mainstream titles from Creator/{{Marvel|Comics}} and Creator/{{DC|Comics}}, are part of a peculiar phenomenon where fans routinely complain about comics they don't like but buy them anyway because they want the complete collection. They thus feel particularly entitled to complain about them, because if they're buying them one way or another, they would rather like them to be worth reading. Comic writers hit back with MortonsFork: if the fans don't like it, they shouldn't buy it (which, if nothing else, will incentivize writers to actually make all their comics worth reading), but if the fans don't buy it, [[ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontWatch they don't have the right to criticize it anyway]].
** Creator/KellySueDeConnick once went on to say "If you don't like my politics, don't buy my books."

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* Comic books, especially the mainstream titles from Creator/{{Marvel|Comics}} and Creator/{{DC|Comics}}, are part of a peculiar phenomenon where fans routinely complain about comics they don't like but buy them anyway because they want the complete collection. They thus feel particularly entitled to complain about them, because if they're buying them one way or another, they would rather like them to be worth reading. Comic writers hit back with MortonsFork: if the fans don't like it, they shouldn't buy it (which, if nothing else, will incentivize writers to actually make all their comics worth reading), but if the fans don't buy it, [[ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontWatch they don't have the right to criticize it anyway]].
**
anyway]]. Creator/KellySueDeConnick once went on to say "If you don't like my politics, don't buy my books."

Added DiffLines:

** Creator/KellySueDeConnick once went on to say "If you don't like my politics, don't buy my books."


While many FanFic authors have issues with assessing their own talent, fans can be equally stupid. "Don't like, don't read" serves as a standard warning for fans who only like to see [[DieForOurShip very specific things ]] happen. In such situations, the only thing to tell such a reader really ''is'' "don't like, don't read", since such criticism doesn't have anything to do with the quality of the writing. Other times, the work is put up in free installments, so it costs nothing to quit while you're ahead, and it can seem remarkably petty to keep forcing yourself to read a LongRunner just to criticize it. (That said, this doesn't make constructive criticism less valid on its own, so it cuts both ways.)

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While many FanFic authors have issues with assessing their own talent, fans can be equally stupid. "Don't like, don't read" serves as a standard warning for fans who only like to see [[DieForOurShip very specific things ]] happen.happen: their favorite ship becoming canon, their favorite character getting a lot of focus, the original plot getting resolved happily, etc. This leads to some people hopping into the review section to proclaim that the story is crap because, say, [[DieForOurShip Alice ended up with Chuck instead of Bob]], when the summary clearly noted it would be an Alice/Chuck story. In such situations, the only thing to tell such a reader really ''is'' "don't like, don't read", since such criticism doesn't have anything to do with the quality of the writing. Other times, the work is put up in free installments, so it costs nothing to quit while you're ahead, and it can seem remarkably petty to keep forcing yourself to read a LongRunner just to criticize it. (That said, this doesn't make constructive criticism less valid on its own, so it cuts both ways.)


** Website/ArchiveOfOurOwn supplements this with an elaborate {{Content Warning|s}} system that requires writers to warn readers of certain objectionable plot points ([[ViolenceIsDisturbing Graphic violence]], [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil rape]], [[KilledOffForReal major character death]], or [[HormoneAddledTeenager any sexual relationship involving minors]]), or else specifically indicate that they're choosing not to tag offensive content, and also allows writers to tag anything else they think the readers will want to know (which can sometimes get out of hand as it can turn into tagging everything of any significance[[note]]some short fics have tags so extensive that the tags basically summarize them in their entirety[[/note]], but that's another matter and is not required or even encouraged). This version of the trope is sometimes summed up by the tag "[[Series/ArrestedDevelopment Dead Dove, Do Not Eat]]", which basically means "you know what you're getting into if you read this".

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** Website/ArchiveOfOurOwn supplements this with an elaborate {{Content Warning|s}} system that requires writers to warn readers of certain objectionable plot points ([[ViolenceIsDisturbing Graphic violence]], [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil rape]], [[KilledOffForReal major character death]], or [[HormoneAddledTeenager any sexual relationship involving minors]]), or else specifically indicate that they're choosing not to tag offensive content, and also allows writers to tag anything else they think the readers will want to know know, i.e. major characters and pairings or other major plot elements (which can sometimes get out of hand as it can turn into tagging everything of any significance[[note]]some short fics have tags so extensive that the tags basically summarize them in their entirety[[/note]], but that's another matter and is not required or even encouraged). This version of the trope is sometimes summed up by the tag "[[Series/ArrestedDevelopment Dead Dove, Do Not Eat]]", which basically means "you know what you're getting into if you read this".

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