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* ''VisualNovel/DanganronpaTriggerHappyHavoc'' had a relatively mundane setting, with everyone being trapped in a large high school, and relatively few plot elements that could be considered bizarre and out-there. Come ''VisualNovel/SuperDanganRonpa2'', suddenly everyone's trapped on a series of tropical islands guarded by giant robots [[spoiler:and one character gets transformed into a robot himself]], the trial room is reached via a giant Monokuma version of Mt. Rushmore, and Monokuma himself has a sidekick to serve as a comedic foil against (in theory, at least.) The executions were pretty silly and full of BlackComedy before, but in this game they went completely insane, including deep-frying people in active volcanoes and rocketing them into space on a giant rocket arm. The plot is still serious, but the setting is far more outlandish. [[spoiler: Which makes sense when you find out it's all a VR simulation.]]

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* ''VisualNovel/DanganronpaTriggerHappyHavoc'' had a relatively mundane setting, with everyone being trapped in a large high school, and relatively few plot elements that could be considered bizarre and out-there. Come ''VisualNovel/SuperDanganRonpa2'', suddenly everyone's trapped on a series of tropical islands guarded by giant robots [[spoiler:and one character gets transformed into a robot himself]], the trial room is reached via a giant Monokuma version of Mt. Rushmore, and Monokuma himself has a sidekick to serve as a comedic foil against (in theory, at least.) The executions were pretty silly and full of BlackComedy before, but in this game they went completely insane, including deep-frying people in active volcanoes and rocketing them into space on a giant rocket arm. The plot is still serious, but the setting is far more outlandish. [[spoiler: Which makes sense when you find out it's all a VR simulation.]]]] The [[VisualNovel/DanganronpaV3KillingHarmony third mainline game]] went for balancing out these competing approaches both by reducing the zany and raising the darkness and having it not be a direct sequel. How well this worked, and even what type of sequel it ultimately is, will remain hotly debated until definitive answers are given, which may be never.


* There are ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' crossover films, such as ''Tom and Jerry and The Wizard of Oz'' and ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerryWillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory'', which are almost shot-for-shot remakes of classic live action films with parts excluded in order to have slapstick humour added in.

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* There are ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' crossover films, such as ''Tom and Jerry and The Wizard of Oz'' ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerryAndTheWizardOfOz'' and ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerryWillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory'', which are almost shot-for-shot remakes of classic live action films with parts excluded in order to have slapstick humour added in.


##[[{{Recap/StarTrekS3E1SpocksBrain}} "Spock’s Brain"]] is the peak of goofy plot lines, cheesy dialog ([[https://youtube.com/watch?v=6o7UDpn1mKI "Brain and brain!"]]) and [[Creator/WilliamShatner Shatner]] going full Shatner. This episode was later lampooned in a ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode, "The Magnificent Ferengi", by having an alien die and then his corpse be reanimated via remote control.

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##[[{{Recap/StarTrekS3E1SpocksBrain}} "Spock’s Brain"]] is the peak of [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9LyFYv35ANw goofy plot lines, lines]], cheesy dialog ([[https://youtube.com/watch?v=6o7UDpn1mKI "Brain and brain!"]]) and [[Creator/WilliamShatner Shatner]] going full Shatner. This episode was later lampooned in a ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode, "The Magnificent Ferengi", by having an alien die and then his corpse be reanimated via remote control.


** ''[[Recap/BlackMirrorUSSCallister USS Callister]]'' explores fantastical technology far-removed from contemporary technologies - how humans might mistreat artificial intelligences that are capable of passing the Turing test and how that would be immoral and indeed ultimately detrimental, and it throws in cheeky {{Shout Out}}s to sci-fi fiction and humour to lighten things up.
** ''[[Recap/BlackMirrorRachelJackAndAshleyToo Rachel, Jack and Ashley Too]]'' starts as a dark drama about a pair of teenage sisters who feel isolated after the death of their mother. One of the sisters seeks solace in a robotic toy based on her pop idol Ashley and it brings out obsessive behaviour that causes friction between the two girls. Meanwhile Ashley herself is a drugged-up depressive who loathes her current career path but is kept under the thumb of her abusive aunt/manager. Then Jack blows the little robot's RestrainingBolt [[BrainUploading and it develops Ashley's full personality]], and then the film becomes a {{Parody}} of a Creator/DisneyChannel Original Movie (and also a scathing TakeThat at Disney's past controlling treatment of its former child stars -- especially Music/MileyCyrus, who plays Ashley here).
* ''Series/BoyMeetsWorld'' got like this in season 7, especially when you compare it to [[CerebusSyndrome the more serious]] season 6. While it had several serious episodes and some realistic plotlines, it also had a lot of convoluted and wacky plotlines, especially the Jack and Eric ones. For example one plotline involved Eric gaining the ability to see into the future whenever he sneezes and Jack trying to use this power to win the lottery. Luckily, this was the show's final season.

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** ''[[Recap/BlackMirrorUSSCallister USS Callister]]'' [[Recap/BlackMirrorUSSCallister "USS Callister"]] explores fantastical technology far-removed from contemporary technologies - how humans might mistreat artificial intelligences that are capable of passing the Turing test and how that would be immoral and indeed ultimately detrimental, and it throws in cheeky {{Shout Out}}s to sci-fi fiction and humour to lighten things up.
** ''[[Recap/BlackMirrorRachelJackAndAshleyToo Rachel, [[Recap/BlackMirrorRachelJackAndAshleyToo "Rachel, Jack and Ashley Too]]'' Too"]] starts as a dark drama about a pair of teenage sisters who feel isolated after the death of their mother. One of the sisters seeks solace in a robotic toy based on her pop idol Ashley and it brings out obsessive behaviour that causes friction between the two girls. Meanwhile Ashley herself is a drugged-up depressive who loathes her current career path but is kept under the thumb of her abusive aunt/manager. Then Jack blows the little robot's RestrainingBolt [[BrainUploading and it develops Ashley's full personality]], and then the film becomes a {{Parody}} of a Creator/DisneyChannel Original Movie (and also (as well as a scathing TakeThat at Disney's past controlling treatment of its former child stars -- especially Music/MileyCyrus, who plays Ashley here).
* ''Series/BoyMeetsWorld'' got like this in season Season 7, especially when you compare it to [[CerebusSyndrome the more serious]] season Season 6. While it had several serious episodes and some realistic plotlines, it also had a lot of convoluted and wacky plotlines, especially the Jack and Eric ones. For example example, one plotline involved Eric gaining the ability to see into the future whenever he sneezes and Jack trying to use this power to win the lottery. Luckily, this was the show's final season.



* [[Series/TheOfficeUS The American version]] of ''The Office'' rolls with this, especially in comparison to [[Series/TheOfficeUK its UK parent]] though not quite as bad as some other shows. The first two seasons (really the first season, but what was technically the first season was stunted) portrayed a fairly realistic day-to-day workplace with a PointyHairedBoss, who, while on the extreme of what should be firing offenses, was fairly realistic in his incompetence, but later seasons saw a more ironclad ContractualImmortality take place for many characters, especially Ryan, Michael, Dwight, and (in one case) Meredith.

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* [[Series/TheOfficeUS The American version]] of ''The Office'' rolls with this, especially in comparison to [[Series/TheOfficeUK its UK parent]] parent]], though not quite as bad as some other shows. The first two seasons (really the first season, but what was technically the first season was stunted) portrayed a fairly realistic day-to-day workplace with a PointyHairedBoss, who, while on the extreme of what should be firing offenses, was fairly realistic in his incompetence, but later seasons saw a more ironclad ContractualImmortality take place for many characters, especially Ryan, Michael, Dwight, and (in one case) Meredith.



* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' started as a very subdued SliceOfLife medical sitcom, more similar to shows like ''Series/TheRoyleFamily'' and ''Series/TheOfficeUS'' with the nominal gimmick that the lead character narrated his life. Over time it transitioned into a more standard American sitcom and then into something almost as wacky as ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''.
* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' became this once Creator/LarryDavid resigned from writing duties after Season Seven. The plots became more cartoonish and fast-paced, the characters became even MORE [[UpToEleven jerkish and self-centered]], and the humor was less subtle. A good example of how much the show changed in its last two seasons is the S8 episode "The Bizarro Jerry", which centers on Elaine hanging out with somebody who's ''literally'' Jerry's exact opposite, Jerry dating a woman with the hands of a man, George concocting a manipulative-even-for-him scheme to get into an exclusive women's club, and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking Kramer getting a job]].

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* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' started as a very subdued SliceOfLife medical sitcom, more similar to shows like ''Series/TheRoyleFamily'' and ''Series/TheOfficeUS'' with the nominal gimmick that the lead character narrated his life. Over time time, it transitioned into a more standard American sitcom and then into something almost as wacky as ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''.
* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' became this once Creator/LarryDavid resigned from writing duties after Season Seven. 7. The plots became more cartoonish and fast-paced, the characters became even MORE ''more'' [[UpToEleven jerkish and self-centered]], and the humor was less subtle. A good example of how much the show changed in its last two seasons is the S8 Season 8 episode "The Bizarro Jerry", which centers on Elaine hanging out with somebody who's ''literally'' Jerry's exact opposite, Jerry dating a woman with the hands of a man, George concocting a manipulative-even-for-him scheme to get into an exclusive women's club, and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking Kramer getting a job]].


* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}}'', like others here, wasn't the most serious of games, but ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'' took it UpToEleven with the wackiness factor. ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' toned down the humor with Bethesda handling it (but still had its odd moments), only for it to return in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', which even features a SillinessSwitch as one of the traits you can pick (and, even without it, there's planty of wacky elements, such as a gang of Elvis impersonators and an evil talking toaster). ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' is then a bit more serious than ''New Vegas'', but still has tons of silly moments and is generally [[LighterAndSofter Lighter and Softer]] than both ''3'' and ''New Vegas''.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}}'', like others here, wasn't the most serious of games, but ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'' took it UpToEleven with the wackiness factor. ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' toned down the humor with Bethesda handling it (but still had its odd moments), only for it to return in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', which even features a SillinessSwitch as one of the traits you can pick (and, even without it, there's planty plenty of wacky elements, such as a gang of Elvis impersonators and an evil talking toaster). ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' is then a bit more serious than ''New Vegas'', but still has tons of silly moments and is generally [[LighterAndSofter Lighter and Softer]] than both ''3'' and ''New Vegas''.


* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}}'', like others here, wasn't the most serious of games, but ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'' took it UpToEleven with the wackiness factor. ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' toned down the humor with Bethesda handling it (but still had its odd moments), only for it to return in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', which even features a SillinessSwitch as one of the traits you can pick. ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' is then a bit more serious than ''New Vegas'', but still has tons of silly moments and is generally [[LighterAndSofter Lighter and Softer]] than both ''3'' and ''New Vegas''.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}}'', like others here, wasn't the most serious of games, but ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'' took it UpToEleven with the wackiness factor. ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' toned down the humor with Bethesda handling it (but still had its odd moments), only for it to return in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', which even features a SillinessSwitch as one of the traits you can pick.pick (and, even without it, there's planty of wacky elements, such as a gang of Elvis impersonators and an evil talking toaster). ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' is then a bit more serious than ''New Vegas'', but still has tons of silly moments and is generally [[LighterAndSofter Lighter and Softer]] than both ''3'' and ''New Vegas''.

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* ''VideoGame/WatchDogs2'' not only moves the action from grim and rainy Chicago to Bay Area, but also gives the new protagonist a [[TrueCompanions meme-spewing hacker collective for friends]] and sets him, among others, against a movie studio shooting a very campy sci-fi movie involving a CoolCar that you have to take for a joyride.


* Summer of 1999 into the early fall, {{Wrestling/WCW}} was beginning to hemorrhage viewers and money. They needed all the help they could get. Wrestling/VinceRusso was brought in as head writer to turn things around. 2000 was the "''what you are now watching is fake''" era when people were ripping up scripts, discussing finishes, etc. (Russo was in a cage match where he fluked his way into the world title, but he wasn't sold as a threat, and the overarching commentary was, "{{Wrestling/Goldberg}} won't follow the script! The script for this show which is fake. And it's so fake that [[WriterOnBoard the head writer scripted himself to be champion!]]") Another time, Wrestling/BookerT won the World Heavyweight Championship out of a box. The direction was also manic. The Texas Tornado Ladder Match from the November 8, 1999 episode of ''[[Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro Nitro]]'' lasted only 7 minutes, including entrances. Another show had 9 matches, none of which lasted over 3 minutes, and at least half had run-ins. Russo had to average about 2 ridiculous GimmickMatches every 3 weeks, including four different varieties of pole matches. WCW 2000 was entertainingly bad, but he kind of threw a concrete block on a drowning promotion which needed a life preserver.

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* Summer of 1999 into the early fall, {{Wrestling/WCW}} was beginning to hemorrhage viewers and money. They needed all the help they could get. Wrestling/VinceRusso was brought in as head writer to turn things around. 2000 was the "''what ''[[NoFourthWall What you are now watching is fake''" fake]]'' era when people were ripping up scripts, discussing finishes, [[FinishingMove finishes,]] etc. (Russo was in a cage match where he fluked his way into the world title, but he wasn't sold as a threat, and the overarching commentary was, "{{Wrestling/Goldberg}} ''{{Wrestling/Goldberg}} won't follow the script! The script for this show which is fake. And it's so fake that [[WriterOnBoard the head writer scripted himself to be champion!]]") champion!]]'' Another time, Wrestling/BookerT won the World Heavyweight Championship out of a box. The direction was also manic. The Texas Tornado Ladder Match from the November 8, 1999 episode of ''[[Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro Nitro]]'' lasted only 7 minutes, including entrances. Another show had 9 matches, none of which lasted over 3 minutes, and at least half had run-ins. Russo had to average about 2 ridiculous GimmickMatches every 3 weeks, including four different varieties of pole matches. WCW 2000 was entertainingly bad, but he kind of threw a concrete block on a drowning promotion which needed a life preserver.


** Not even ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' was exempt from this: [[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS7E13SubRosa}} Planet Scotland!]] According to the Memory Alpha wiki, there was a large demographic of middle-aged women that watched TNG; this episode was a failed attempt at rewarding them with something related to their interests. There's really not much to say besides everyone acting like they're from the most cliche romance novels, the accents were abominable, and Beverly Crusher has sex with a space ghost while reading a pornographic story about her grandma. At least they're doing better than [[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E18UpTheLongLadder}} Space Ireland]] did. Jesus, that was actually a real episode.
** ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' (a.k.a. the one with [[{{Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS2E15Threshold}} the salamander boinking]] episode). First, it was the second spinoff of ''The Next Generation'', starting one year after ''Next Gen'' went off the air. ''Deep Space Nine'' was running concurrently, but it began before ''Voyager'' did. Right off the bat, you have franchise fatigue, because there’s not a lot of ideas that haven't already been covered by then. Second, unlike TNG or [=DS9=], VOY was tethered to a network. {{Creator/UPN}}’s core demographics were skewed less toward sci-fi and more toward low-brow entertainment. (This is why we eventually got Wrestling/TheRock in [[{{Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS6E15Tsunkatse}} an episode]], as UPN hosted {{Wrestling/WWE}} at the time.) So it not only had to contend with network demands, like getting more visually-appealing actors, but also the demands from a network audience who weren't predisposed to liking ''Trek''. Hence, ''Voyager'' skewed lighter, with episodes such as [[{{Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS6E5Alice}} Tom Paris buying a spaceship]], which has a brain interface (plastic headband) for controls? Which results in him falling in love with the spacecraft, which kidnaps him and tries to kill his girlfriend. Which is the plot of ''{{Literature/Christine}}'', obviously.

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** Not even ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' was exempt from this: [[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS7E13SubRosa}} Planet Scotland!]] According to the Memory Alpha wiki, there was a large demographic of middle-aged women that watched TNG; this episode was a failed attempt at rewarding them with something related to their interests. There's really not much to say besides everyone everyone's acting like they're from the most cliche romance novels, the accents were are abominable, and Beverly Crusher has sex with a space ghost while reading a pornographic story about her grandma. At least they're doing better than [[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E18UpTheLongLadder}} Space Ireland]] did. Jesus, that was actually a real episode.
** ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' (a.k.a. the one with [[{{Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS2E15Threshold}} the salamander boinking]] episode). First, it was the second spinoff of ''The Next Generation'', starting one year after ''Next Gen'' went off the air. ''Deep Space Nine'' was running concurrently, but it began before ''Voyager'' did. Right off the bat, you have franchise fatigue, because there’s not a lot of ideas that haven't already been covered by then. Second, unlike TNG or [=DS9=], VOY was tethered to a network. {{Creator/UPN}}’s core demographics were skewed less toward sci-fi and more toward low-brow entertainment. (This is why we eventually got Wrestling/TheRock in [[{{Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS6E15Tsunkatse}} an episode]], as UPN hosted {{Wrestling/WWE}} at the time.) So it not only had to contend with network demands, like getting more visually-appealing actors, but also the demands expectations from a network audience who weren't predisposed to liking ''Trek''. Hence, ''Voyager'' skewed lighter, with episodes such as [[{{Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS6E5Alice}} Tom Paris buying a spaceship]], which has a brain interface (plastic headband) for controls? Which results in him falling in love with the spacecraft, which kidnaps him and tries to kill his girlfriend. Which is the plot of ''{{Literature/Christine}}'', obviously.


##[[{{Recap/StarTrekS3E1SpocksBrain}} "Spock’s Brain"]] is the peak of goofy plot lines, cheesy dialog ([[https://youtube.com/watch?v=6o7UDpn1mKI "Brain and brain!"]]) and [[Creator/WilliamShatner Shatner]] going full Shatner. This episode was later lampooned in a ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode, "The Magnificent Ferengi", by having an alien die and then his corpse reanimated via remote control.

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##[[{{Recap/StarTrekS3E1SpocksBrain}} "Spock’s Brain"]] is the peak of goofy plot lines, cheesy dialog ([[https://youtube.com/watch?v=6o7UDpn1mKI "Brain and brain!"]]) and [[Creator/WilliamShatner Shatner]] going full Shatner. This episode was later lampooned in a ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode, "The Magnificent Ferengi", by having an alien die and then his corpse be reanimated via remote control.


* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' started as a gritty and semi-realistic before being tied in with more standard superhero spin-offs like ''Series/TheFlash2014'' and ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow''.

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* ''Series/{{Arrowverse}}'':
**
''Series/{{Arrow}}'' started as a gritty and semi-realistic show before being tied in with more standard superhero spin-offs like ''Series/TheFlash2014'' and ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow''.

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* ''WebAnimation/LoboWebseries'' focuses on humor compared to the rest of the ''Franchise/DCAnimatedUniverse''. It is still BloodierAndGorier thanks to graphic violence.

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* ''Manga/JojosBizarreAdventure'' took this approach since part 2 (''Manga/BattleTendency'') and has kept at it ever since. Becoming more self aware in how bizarre the series and fights actually are.
** From the creative ways Joseph and Ceaser use their Hamon, the fact one of the reoccurring characters is a ''Cyborg Nazi'', One of the villains is a ''crybaby'', and is part of a trio of [[OurVampiresAreDifferent Aztec fitness super-vampire]] that strike a lot more poses than either Dio or Jonathan in ''Manga/PhantomBlood''... culminating in the main villain becoming an Aztec Glam Metal screaming bird vampire who constantly licks his lips.
** In terms of super powers [[Manga/StardustCrusaders part 3]] introduces flashy but tame abilities such as SuperSpeed, [[PlayingWithFire Fire]] and magnetism... [[Manga/DiamondIsUnbreakable Part 4]] mixes things up with food that attacks you through a recently acquired health problem [[spoiler:which turns out to be beneficial]] and weaponized {{Onomatopoeia}}... [[Manga/GoldenWind Part 5]] starts out with a man capable of slipping objects into people's hands and mouths without them realizing it, who is later defeated by villain able to erase 10 seconds of time, ''then'' [[Manga/StoneOcean Part 6]] introducing the infamous [[https://jojo.fandom.com/wiki/Dragon%27s_Dream Dragon's Dream]] which would require its own folder just to describe.

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* ''Videogame/DoubleDragon III: The Sacred Stones.''
-->'''[[http://projectnes.blogspot.com/2011/01/elsewhere-there-be-dragons-double.html Dr. El Sandifer]]''': The game plays with typical late-NES [[{{Sequelitis}} sequel sloppiness]] -- graphics feel rushed, flat, and lifeless. But conceptually speaking, the game is completely nuts, involving running around the world collecting Rosetta Stones, of which there are apparently several now, so that they can eventually fight [[UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII Cleopatra]]. Sadly, [[CulturalTranslation the plot was sanitized]] for the [American] release, not in the sense of censorship but in the sense of adding sanity.


->''"''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' no longer marks the elevation of the sitcom formula to its highest form. Episodes that once would have ended with Homer and Marge bicycling into the sunset (perhaps while Bart gagged in the background) now end with Homer blowing a tranquilizer dart into Marge's neck."''
-->-- '''''Slate''''', [[http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/assessment/2003/02/the_simpsons.html The Simpsons: Who turned America's best TV show into a cartoon?]]

The ToneShift that a show goes through when its plots become increasingly exaggerated and cartoonish. Most often happens with shows whose initial premise is mundane, and ostensibly could take place in the real world, begin to gradually take in tropes from more elaborate genre fiction until the show is at a point where it no longer resembles its pilot episode at all. This is similar to CerebusSyndrome, except that instead of working on tone this trope increases the density and zaniness of literal plot elements, often requiring a greater WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief and viewer concentration level in order to succeed.

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->''"''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' no longer marks ->''Mr. Howell now has the elevation power to fly\\
The role
of the sitcom formula to its highest form. Episodes that once would have ended with Homer and Marge bicycling into the sunset (perhaps while Bart gagged Mary Ann is now being played by Kareem Abdul-Jabar\\
Ginger is 500 feet high\\
She is made entirely out of zinc\\
I don't remember her being ''that'' way
in the background) now end first season''
-->-- '''Radio Free Vestibule''', "Something's Wrong
with Homer blowing a tranquilizer dart into Marge's neck."''
-->-- '''''Slate''''', [[http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/assessment/2003/02/the_simpsons.html The Simpsons: Who turned America's best TV show into a cartoon?]]

Series/GilligansIsland"

The ToneShift that a show goes through when its plots become increasingly exaggerated and cartoonish. Most often happens with shows whose initial premise is mundane, and ostensibly could take place in the real world, begin to gradually take in tropes from more elaborate genre fiction until the show is at a point where it no longer resembles its pilot episode at all. This is similar to CerebusSyndrome, except that instead of working on tone this trope increases the density and zaniness of literal plot elements, often requiring a greater WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief and viewer concentration level in order to succeed.

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