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* HelpingGrannyCrossTheStreet: The only examples you'll see in modern media involves the old lady never wanting to cross in the first place, or crankily belting the hero with their cane or handbag. Occasionally the straight version still shows up in commercials and music videos with a "good deeds, pass them on" theme. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2Hs868FxGY&feature=player_detailpage#t=91 There are some real life examples here.]]

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* HelpingGrannyCrossTheStreet: The only examples you'll see in modern media involves the old lady never wanting to cross in the first place, or crankily belting the hero with their cane or handbag. Occasionally the straight version still shows up in commercials and music videos with a "good deeds, pass them on" theme. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2Hs868FxGY&feature=player_detailpage#t=91 There are some real life examples here.]]

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* SpinoffBabies: Serious attempts at this after the 2000s are exceedingly rare due to how cliché and ridiculous the premise is. Parodies of it are far more common nowadays.


* DastardlyWhiplash: The original form of this stock villain character appeared in stage melodramas through the 1910s to the 1930s, after which it was parodied in silent film; the character has been appearing only as a parody of itself for so long that the parody is now the trope and its origins are close to being [[ForgottenTrope forgotten altogether]]. For the record, even in silent film, the only work that contains a character similar to Dastardly Whiplash at all is the serial ''Film/ThePerilsOfPauline'', and in it the character [[UnbuiltTrope is quite different from any later parodies]]. As ''WesternAnimation/MightyMouse'' had several Pauline-like episodes with such a villain (a mustachioed cat named Oil Can Harry), and ''WesternAnimation/DudleyDoRight'' was a parody of ''Pauline'' in many ways, this led to the misconception that such a character was very common throughout all silent films.

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* DastardlyWhiplash: The original form of this stock villain character appeared in stage melodramas through between the 1910s to 1880s and the 1930s, early 1910s, after which it was parodied in silent film; the character has been appearing only as a parody of itself for so long that the parody is now the trope and its origins are close to being [[ForgottenTrope forgotten altogether]]. For the record, even in silent film, the only work that contains a character similar to Dastardly Whiplash at all is the 1912 serial ''Film/ThePerilsOfPauline'', and in it the character [[UnbuiltTrope is quite different from any later parodies]]. As ''WesternAnimation/MightyMouse'' had several Pauline-like episodes with such a villain (a mustachioed cat named Oil Can Harry), and ''WesternAnimation/DudleyDoRight'' was a parody of ''Pauline'' in many ways, this led to the misconception that such a character was very common throughout all silent films.



* DoggedNiceGuy: As women have considerably raised their relationship standards during the 2010s, being just "nice" likely won't get a man anywhere in dating, ending instead in the "friendzone" or, on a more sinister note, labeling himself as an [[StrawMisogynist "incel"]][[note]]"involuntary celibate", an Internet "society" that has caused a few serious incidents in real life[[/note]]. Many modern works ([[DeliberateValuesDissonance unless set somewhere between the late 1960s and 2000s]]) will often portray the "nice guy" as an [[ManipulativeBastard emotionally manipulative]] [[EntitledToHaveYou stalker who won't take "no" as an answer]].



* DonutMessWithACop: Many actual donut shops would now face fines or other undesirable consequences if they gave free donuts and coffee to law enforcement officials. On the other hand, this just means the cops just buy the donuts and coffee and still hang out there, so it manages to remain true even though it's a dead horse (cops are fully aware of the trope and treat it with a laugh, because who ''doesn't'' like donuts?)
* DunceCap: The only time this really saw much use was in the early 20th century. Anyone trying it in real life nowadays would be setting themselves up for all kinds of trouble. Plus, what with an increased focus against bullying in TheNewTens, singling out a student and calling him stupid in this manner, even in fiction, would never fly.

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* DonutMessWithACop: Many Depending on the jurisdiction, many actual donut shops now would now either offer free donuts and coffee to law enforcement officials as a public service or, more commonly, face fines or other undesirable consequences if they gave free donuts and coffee to law enforcement officials.them, as it would be considered bribing. On the other hand, this just means the cops just buy the donuts and coffee and still hang out there, so it manages to remain true even though it's a dead horse (cops are fully aware of the trope and treat it with a laugh, because who ''doesn't'' like donuts?)
* DunceCap: The only time this really saw much use was in the early 20th century. Anyone trying it in real life nowadays would be setting themselves up for all kinds of trouble. Plus, what with an increased focus against bullying in TheNewTens, singling out a student and calling him stupid even in this manner, even in fiction, would never fly.



* SleepingSingle: An EnforcedTrope by film censors implementing the Hays Code in the [=1930s=]. It was considered kind of silly even at the time, and a couple sharing a bed wasn't even outright banned in the Code's heyday. Sitcoms from the [=1960's=] (and actually before[[note]]''Mary Kay and Johnny'' featured the leads sleeping in the same bed in 1947[[/note]]) started ignoring the Code (even considering that TV had a stricter code than film), and this trope died along with it.

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* SleepingSingle: An EnforcedTrope by film censors implementing the Hays Code in the [=1930s=]. It was considered kind of silly even at the time, and a couple sharing a bed wasn't even outright banned in the Code's heyday. Sitcoms from the [=1960's=] (and actually before[[note]]''Mary Kay and Johnny'' featured the leads sleeping in the same bed in 1947[[/note]]) started ignoring the Code featured couples sleeping together (even considering that TV had a stricter code than film), and this trope died along with it.



* UnderwearOfPower: In SuperHero comics, the underwear (which is actually trunks) over your tights variety was widely influenced by circus "strongman" of the early 20th century, though it has fallen out of use as a garment in real life due to recent innovations of elastic fibers such as spandex, which prevented tearing of their costumes while performing their stunts. Since modern times it's hard to modernize trunks as a garment not only by superheroes but also by other modern characters.
* {{Utopia}} is mostly deconstructed in these days.
* VampireVords: Strongly associated with "old", Creator/BelaLugosi-style vampires. Neither the modern "sexy" vampires or the few genuinely threatening ones in modern fiction talk this way, because it's silly. Bela himself didn't talk that way; initially memorizing his English lines phonetically, he tended to pronounce "w" as "wh".

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* UnderwearOfPower: In SuperHero comics, the underwear (which is actually (actually trunks) over your tights variety was widely influenced by circus "strongman" "strongmen" of the early 20th century, though it has fallen out of use as a garment in real life due to recent innovations of elastic fibers such as spandex, which prevented tearing of their costumes while performing their stunts. Since modern times it's hard to modernize trunks as a garment not only by superheroes but also by other modern characters.
* {{Utopia}} is mostly deconstructed in these days.
{{Utopia}}: An UndeadHorseTrope, varying between deconstruction or reconstruction depending on the attitudes of the day.
* VampireVords: Strongly associated with "old", Creator/BelaLugosi-style vampires. Neither the modern "sexy" vampires or the few genuinely threatening ones in modern fiction talk this way, because it's silly. [[DeadUnicornTrope Bela himself didn't talk that way; initially memorizing his English lines phonetically, he tended to pronounce "w" as "wh"."wh"]].


* RawEggsMakeYouStronger: Raw eggs have no more nutritional content than cooked ones and are a salmonella hazard besides. Any modern use of this trope either [[PlayedForLaughs plays it for laughs]] by having the character spit them out, or subverts it (i.e. [[WesternAnimation/HeyArnold by making it look like the character is going to drink raw eggs, only for them to pour them into a hot pan and cook them properly]]).

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* RawEggsMakeYouStronger: Raw eggs have no more nutritional content than cooked ones and are a salmonella hazard besides. Any modern use of this trope either [[PlayedForLaughs plays it for laughs]] by having the character spit them out, out or refuse to drink them. Or subverts it (i.e. having the character get sick from them or [[WesternAnimation/HeyArnold by making it look like the character is going to drink raw eggs, only for them to pour them into a hot pan and cook them properly]]).

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* CurlyHairIsUgly: In various cultures it's this, with the exception of when a bully or a jerk mocks someone for their hair and the narrative doesn't agree. It's inappropriate and sometimes even considered racist to mock someone just for having curly hair.

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* UnderwearOfPower: In SuperHero comics, the underwear (which is actually trunks) over your tights variety was widely influenced by circus "strongman" of the early 20th century, though it has fallen out of use as a garment in real life due to recent innovations of elastic fibers such as spandex, which prevented tearing of their costumes while performing their stunts. Since modern times it's hard to modernize trunks as a garment not only by superheroes but also by other modern characters.


* RawEggsMakeYouStronger: Cooked eggs have pretty much the same nutritional value as raw ones, which are a salmonella hazard. Any modern use of this trope either [[PlayedForLaughs plays it for laughs]] by having the character spit them out, or subverts it (i.e. [[WesternAnimation/HeyArnold by making it look like the character is going to drink raw eggs, only for them to pour them into a hot pan and cook them]]).

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* RawEggsMakeYouStronger: Cooked Raw eggs have pretty much the same no more nutritional value as raw ones, which content than cooked ones and are a salmonella hazard.hazard besides. Any modern use of this trope either [[PlayedForLaughs plays it for laughs]] by having the character spit them out, or subverts it (i.e. [[WesternAnimation/HeyArnold by making it look like the character is going to drink raw eggs, only for them to pour them into a hot pan and cook them]]).them properly]]).



* RosesAreRedVioletsAreBlue: Parodied more often than played straight, it's true.

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* RosesAreRedVioletsAreBlue: Parodied Played with more often than played straight, it's true.not, but still used.



* SlowNo: This trope is parodied now, and virtually never used straight these days.

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* SlowNo: This trope is parodied now, and virtually never used straight these days.



* StandardFiftiesFather: TheFifties ended. The BumblingDad, originally a pretty clear way of rebelling against this trope, eventually become so prevalent in modern media that showing a sensible, competent father (in a sitcom, anyway) is now the rarity. The presence of well-meaning, intelligent (but still quirky) father figures saw a revival in the 1980s, but it has also become a remnant of that period, not to mention some [[FunnyAneurysmMoment tragedy in retrospective]] in most cases.

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* StandardFiftiesFather: Doesn't hold up so well now that TheFifties ended. are over. The BumblingDad, originally a pretty clear way rejection of rebelling against this trope, eventually become so prevalent in modern media that showing a sensible, competent father (in a sitcom, anyway) is now the rarity. subversion. The presence of well-meaning, intelligent (but still quirky) father figures saw a revival in the 1980s, but it has also become a remnant of that period, not to mention some [[FunnyAneurysmMoment tragedy tragic in retrospective]] retrospect]] in most cases.cases where RealitySubtext (or the actor's death) undermine the character.



* SubvertedSuspicionAesop - This type of Suspicion Aesop is NEVER played straight- there's a reason that {{Subverted|Trope}} is in the page title. Sometimes a DoubleSubversion is put on it, but it's never played straight.
* SuperheroesWearCapes: This was pretty common during UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks, but fell out of favor over time. Few superheroes are unironically given capes anymore; those who do have them usually hearken back to a time to when capes were more popular.

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* SubvertedSuspicionAesop - SubvertedSuspicionAesop: This type of Suspicion Aesop is NEVER played straight- straight -- there's a reason that {{Subverted|Trope}} is in the page title. Sometimes a DoubleSubversion is put on it, but it's never played straight.
* SuperheroesWearCapes: This was pretty common during UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks, but fell out of favor over time. Few superheroes are unironically given capes anymore; those who do have them usually hearken back to a time to when capes were more popular.popular or reflect a character's use of the GoodOldWays.


* RawEggsMakeYouStronger: Cooked eggs have pretty much the same nutritional value than raw ones, which are a salmonella hazard. Any modern use of this trope either [[PlayedForLaughs plays it for laughs]] by having the character spit them out, or subverts it (i.e. [[WesternAnimation/HeyArnold by making it look like the character is going to drink raw eggs, only for them to pour them into a hot pan and cook them]]).

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* RawEggsMakeYouStronger: Cooked eggs have pretty much the same nutritional value than as raw ones, which are a salmonella hazard. Any modern use of this trope either [[PlayedForLaughs plays it for laughs]] by having the character spit them out, or subverts it (i.e. [[WesternAnimation/HeyArnold by making it look like the character is going to drink raw eggs, only for them to pour them into a hot pan and cook them]]).


* RawEggsMakeYouStronger: Cooked eggs have pretty much the same nutritional value than raw ones, which are a salmonella hazard. Any modern use of this trope either [[PlayedForLaughs plays it for laughs]] by having the character spit them out, or subverts it (i.e. by making it look like the character is going to drink raw eggs, only for them to pour them into a hot pan and cook them).

to:

* RawEggsMakeYouStronger: Cooked eggs have pretty much the same nutritional value than raw ones, which are a salmonella hazard. Any modern use of this trope either [[PlayedForLaughs plays it for laughs]] by having the character spit them out, or subverts it (i.e. [[WesternAnimation/HeyArnold by making it look like the character is going to drink raw eggs, only for them to pour them into a hot pan and cook them).them]]).

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* RawEggsMakeYouStronger: Cooked eggs have pretty much the same nutritional value than raw ones, which are a salmonella hazard. Any modern use of this trope either [[PlayedForLaughs plays it for laughs]] by having the character spit them out, or subverts it (i.e. by making it look like the character is going to drink raw eggs, only for them to pour them into a hot pan and cook them).

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* ImagineTheAudienceNaked: This doesn't work. [[http://blog.jvf.com/2009/01/24/public-speaking-myths-imagining-your-audience-in-their-underwear-makes-you-less-nervous/ As editorials and blog posts have explained]], even if the public speaker is capable of such a feat under such a high-stress situation, it has a very high likelihood of backfiring because of how needlessly distracting it is. There are many ways of calming your nerves during a public speech, but this is assuredly not one of them. If a work uses this trope at all anymore, it will parody the concept, usually by making the audience actually naked with the speaker thinking it's working.


* NewYearsResolutios: It's commonly accepted that most people can't keep their resolutions - [[http://www.businessinsider.com/new-years-resolutions-courses-2016-12 oftentimes giving up as early as February]] -and thus they're taken as empty promises, at best. Even in fiction, [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption they're always going to end in failure]].

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* NewYearsResolutios: NewYearsResolution: It's commonly accepted that most people can't keep their resolutions - [[http://www.businessinsider.com/new-years-resolutions-courses-2016-12 oftentimes giving up as early as February]] -and thus they're taken as empty promises, at best. Even in fiction, [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption they're always going to end in failure]].


* NewYearsResolutions: It's commonly accepted that most people can't keep their resolutions - [[http://www.businessinsider.com/new-years-resolutions-courses-2016-12 oftentimes giving up as early as February]] -and thus they're taken as empty promises, at best. Even in fiction, [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption they're always going to end in failure]].

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* NewYearsResolutions: NewYearsResolutios: It's commonly accepted that most people can't keep their resolutions - [[http://www.businessinsider.com/new-years-resolutions-courses-2016-12 oftentimes giving up as early as February]] -and thus they're taken as empty promises, at best. Even in fiction, [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption they're always going to end in failure]].

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* NewYearsResolutions: It's commonly accepted that most people can't keep their resolutions - [[http://www.businessinsider.com/new-years-resolutions-courses-2016-12 oftentimes giving up as early as February]] -and thus they're taken as empty promises, at best. Even in fiction, [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption they're always going to end in failure]].

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