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* Played with in ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' episode "The Vengeance Formulation". Sheldon gets an interview on NPR's ''Science Friday'' to a discuss a "recent so-called discovery of magnetic monopoles in spin ices": he says they wanted to [[RatingsStunt "goose the ratings" for pledge week with something controversial]]. [[SitcomArchNemesis Barry Kripke]] [[HeliumSpeech pumps helium]] into the office where Sheldon was doing the interview from. HilarityEnsues.

to:

* Played with in ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' episode "The Vengeance Formulation". Sheldon gets an interview on NPR's ''Science Friday'' to a discuss a "recent so-called discovery of magnetic monopoles in spin ices": he says they wanted to [[RatingsStunt "goose the ratings" for pledge week with something controversial]]. [[SitcomArchNemesis Barry Kripke]] [[HeliumSpeech pumps helium]] into the office where Sheldon was doing the interview from. HilarityEnsues.[[HilarityEnsues Hilarity]] (and [[CoveredInGunge payback]]) ensues.


** In another episode, DW is upset that her favorite show, ''Mary Moo Cow'' is off the air, and has been replaced with a woman reading off stock reports. It turns out that she's the one who wore the Mary Moo Cow costume, and decided it was time for a change.

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** In another episode, DW is upset that her favorite show, ''Mary Moo Cow'' is off the air, and has been replaced with Cow'', was cancelled in favor of a woman reading off stock reports. financial news program. It turns out that she's the one anchorwoman was actually the person who wore the played Mary Moo Cow costume, Cow, and had decided it was time for a change.

Added DiffLines:

** In another episode, DW is upset that her favorite show, ''Mary Moo Cow'' is off the air, and has been replaced with a woman reading off stock reports. It turns out that she's the one who wore the Mary Moo Cow costume, and decided it was time for a change.


* Referenced by the quiz show ''Series/RemoteControl'', which featured a "Public Television" category with difficult questions involving subjects such as science]], rather than music and pop culture like the rest of the show. The host outright claims that nobody knew the answer to these questions because people rarely watch public television. However, there were moments when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPi2GMMbzTE a contestant correctly answered something from this category]] (of course, the contestant in the linked clip couldn't name the lead singer of Music/{{Queen}}: you win some, you lose some).

to:

* Referenced by the quiz show ''Series/RemoteControl'', which featured a "Public Television" category with difficult questions involving subjects such as science]], science, rather than music and pop culture like the rest of the show. The host outright claims that nobody knew the answer to these questions because people rarely watch public television. However, there were moments when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPi2GMMbzTE a contestant correctly answered something from this category]] (of course, the contestant in the linked clip couldn't name the lead singer of Music/{{Queen}}: you win some, you lose some).


* The quiz show ''Series/RemoteControl'' had a category known as "Public Television", which featured [[UnexpectedlyObscureAnswer difficult questions involving subjects such as science]], as opposed to music and pop culture like the rest of the show. The host's spiel for the category claims that because only 8% of people actually watch public television, you won't know the answer. However, there were moments when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPi2GMMbzTE a contestant correctly answered something from this category.]] Of course, the contestant in the linked clip couldn't name the lead singer of Music/{{Queen}}: you win some, you lose some.

to:

* The Referenced by the quiz show ''Series/RemoteControl'' had a category known as "Public Television", ''Series/RemoteControl'', which featured [[UnexpectedlyObscureAnswer a "Public Television" category with difficult questions involving subjects such as science]], as opposed to rather than music and pop culture like the rest of the show. The host's spiel for the category host outright claims that nobody knew the answer to these questions because only 8% of people actually rarely watch public television, you won't know the answer.television. However, there were moments when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPi2GMMbzTE a contestant correctly answered something from this category.]] Of category]] (of course, the contestant in the linked clip couldn't name the lead singer of Music/{{Queen}}: you win some, you lose some.some).


* Parodied in the late-1990's ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' sketch "The Delicious Dish", which focused on an eponymous cooking show on NPR. The hosts, Margaret Jo [=McCullen=] and Teri Rialto (Ana Gasteyer and Molly Shannon) speak in unenergetic monotone voices, and discuss mundane, cooking-related topics with their guests. They don't break character, even if they are contributing to a barrage of [[DoubleEntendre double entendres]] about a [[Creator/AlecBaldwin chef]]'s [[BallsGag "Schweddy Balls"]] (as heard in the most famous edition of the sketch, which is almost always featured in the annual ''SNL'' Christmas ClipShow).

to:

* Parodied in the late-1990's ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' sketch "The Delicious Dish", which focused on an eponymous cooking show on NPR. The hosts, Margaret Jo [=McCullen=] and Teri Rialto (Ana Gasteyer and Molly Shannon) speak in unenergetic monotone voices, and discuss mundane, cooking-related topics with their guests. They don't break character, even if they are contributing to a barrage of [[DoubleEntendre double entendres]] about a [[Creator/AlecBaldwin chef]]'s [[BallsGag "Schweddy Balls"]] (as heard in the most famous edition of the sketch, which is almost always featured in the annual ''SNL'' Christmas ClipShow).ClipShow special).


* Parodied in the late-1990's ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' sketch "The Delicious Dish", which focused on an eponymous cooking show on NPR. The hosts, Margaret Jo [=McCullen=] and Teri Rialto (Ana Gasteyer and Molly Shannon), discuss mundane, cooking-related topics with their guests, and sound perpetually bored whilst doing so. They don't break character, even if they are contributing to a barrage of [[DoubleEntendre double entendres]] about a [[Creator/AlecBaldwin chef]]'s [[BallsGag "Schweddy Balls"]] (as heard in the most famous edition of the sketch, which is almost always featured in the annual ''SNL'' Christmas ClipShow).

to:

* Parodied in the late-1990's ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' sketch "The Delicious Dish", which focused on an eponymous cooking show on NPR. The hosts, Margaret Jo [=McCullen=] and Teri Rialto (Ana Gasteyer and Molly Shannon), Shannon) speak in unenergetic monotone voices, and discuss mundane, cooking-related topics with their guests, and sound perpetually bored whilst doing so.guests. They don't break character, even if they are contributing to a barrage of [[DoubleEntendre double entendres]] about a [[Creator/AlecBaldwin chef]]'s [[BallsGag "Schweddy Balls"]] (as heard in the most famous edition of the sketch, which is almost always featured in the annual ''SNL'' Christmas ClipShow).


Public radio and television, especially the U.S. Creator/{{NPR}} and Creator/{{PBS}} networks, tend to delve into more serious topics (such as education, politics, science, the arts, classical and/or jazz music, and the occasional pledge drive) than the average commercial broadcaster. Similarly, the "soft adult contemporary" radio format tries to be [[LighterAndSofter inoffensive in its content]] to appeal to workplaces and an older demographic, focusing primarily on "soft rock" and ballads, new and old (although this is now a stereotype, as many Soft AC stations are subverting this by incorporating more upbeat yet "safe" fare).

to:

Public radio and television, especially the U.S. Creator/{{NPR}} and Creator/{{PBS}} networks, tend to delve into more serious topics (such as education, politics, science, the fine arts, classical and/or jazz music, and the occasional pledge drive) than the average commercial broadcaster. Similarly, the "soft adult contemporary" radio format tries to be [[LighterAndSofter inoffensive in its content]] to appeal to workplaces and an older demographic, focusing primarily on "soft rock" and ballads, new and old (although this is now a stereotype, as many Soft AC stations are subverting this by incorporating more upbeat yet "safe" fare).



It's no surprise that the these types of broadcasters are often a target for satire, stereotyping them as having little to no viewers due to their reputation or quality, attempting to stay relevant with a RatingsStunt or two, outright begging for money because they have NoBudget, or portraying a character as having an interest in shows on such channels just to prove how much of an intellectual they are.

to:

It's no surprise that the these types of broadcasters outlets are often a target for satire, stereotyping them as having little to no viewers due to their reputation or quality, attempting to stay relevant with a RatingsStunt or two, outright begging for money because they have NoBudget, or portraying a character as having an character's interest in shows on such channels just to prove how much programs as an example of an intellectual they are.
their [[TheSmartGuy intellectualism.]]


* ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' had a recurring sketch in the late 1990's known as "The Delicious Dish", which focused on an eponymous cooking show on NPR. The hosts, Margaret Jo [=McCullen=] and Teri Rialto (Ana Gasteyer and Molly Shannon), discuss mundane, cooking-related topics, and sound perpetually bored whilst doing so. They don't break character, even if they are contributing to a barrage of [[DoubleEntendre double entendres]] about a chef's [[BallsGag "Schweddy Balls"]] (as heard in the most famous edition of the sketch, which is almost always featured in the annual ''SNL'' Christmas ClipShow special).

to:

* Parodied in the late-1990's ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' had a recurring sketch in the late 1990's known as "The Delicious Dish", which focused on an eponymous cooking show on NPR. The hosts, Margaret Jo [=McCullen=] and Teri Rialto (Ana Gasteyer and Molly Shannon), discuss mundane, cooking-related topics, topics with their guests, and sound perpetually bored whilst doing so. They don't break character, even if they are contributing to a barrage of [[DoubleEntendre double entendres]] about a chef's [[Creator/AlecBaldwin chef]]'s [[BallsGag "Schweddy Balls"]] (as heard in the most famous edition of the sketch, which is almost always featured in the annual ''SNL'' Christmas ClipShow special).ClipShow).


** A cold open sketch on ''Series/TheLateShowWithStephenColbert'' introduced [=C-SPAN3=] as "the channel you find by sitting on your remote."



* Parodied in a cold open on ''Series/TheLateShowWithStephenColbert'', which introduced [=C-SPAN3=] as "the channel you find by sitting on your remote."


* ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' had a recurring sketch in the late 1990's known as "The Delicious Dish", which focused on an eponymous cooking show on NPR. The hosts, Margaret Jo [=McCullen=] and Teri Rialto (Ana Gasteyer and Molly Shannon), discuss mundane, cooking-related topics, and sound perpetually bored whilst doing so. They don't break character, even if they are contributing to a barrage of [[DoubleEntendre double entendres]] about a chef's [[BallsGag "Schweddy Balls"]] (said edition of the sketch is frequently featured in the show's annual Christmas ClipShow special).

to:

* ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' had a recurring sketch in the late 1990's known as "The Delicious Dish", which focused on an eponymous cooking show on NPR. The hosts, Margaret Jo [=McCullen=] and Teri Rialto (Ana Gasteyer and Molly Shannon), discuss mundane, cooking-related topics, and sound perpetually bored whilst doing so. They don't break character, even if they are contributing to a barrage of [[DoubleEntendre double entendres]] about a chef's [[BallsGag "Schweddy Balls"]] (said (as heard in the most famous edition of the sketch sketch, which is frequently almost always featured in the show's annual ''SNL'' Christmas ClipShow special).


Public radio and television, especially the U.S. Creator/{{NPR}} and Creator/{{PBS}} networks, tend to delve into more serious topics (such as education, politics, science, the arts, classical and/or jazz music, and the occasional pledge drive) than the average commercial broadcaster. Similarly, the "soft adult contemporary" radio format tries to be [[LighterAndSofter inoffensive in its content]] to appeal to workplaces and an older demographic, focusing primarily on "soft rock" and ballads, new and old.

to:

Public radio and television, especially the U.S. Creator/{{NPR}} and Creator/{{PBS}} networks, tend to delve into more serious topics (such as education, politics, science, the arts, classical and/or jazz music, and the occasional pledge drive) than the average commercial broadcaster. Similarly, the "soft adult contemporary" radio format tries to be [[LighterAndSofter inoffensive in its content]] to appeal to workplaces and an older demographic, focusing primarily on "soft rock" and ballads, new and old.
old (although this is now a stereotype, as many Soft AC stations are subverting this by incorporating more upbeat yet "safe" fare).



to:

* Parodied in a cold open on ''Series/TheLateShowWithStephenColbert'', which introduced [=C-SPAN3=] as "the channel you find by sitting on your remote."


* Played with in ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' episode "The Vengeance Formulation". Sheldon is interviewed over the phone by NPR's ''Science Friday'' on a "recent so-called discovery of magnetic monopoles in spin ices", so they could [[RatingsStunt "goose the ratings" for pledge week with something controversial]]. [[SitcomArchNemesis Barry Kripke]] [[HeliumSpeech pumps helium]] into the office where Sheldon was doing the interview from. HilarityEnsues.

to:

* Played with in ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' episode "The Vengeance Formulation". Sheldon is interviewed over the phone by gets an interview on NPR's ''Science Friday'' on to a discuss a "recent so-called discovery of magnetic monopoles in spin ices", so ices": he says they could wanted to [[RatingsStunt "goose the ratings" for pledge week with something controversial]]. [[SitcomArchNemesis Barry Kripke]] [[HeliumSpeech pumps helium]] into the office where Sheldon was doing the interview from. HilarityEnsues.


* The quiz show ''Series/RemoteControl'' had a category known as "Public Television", which featured [[UnexpectedlyObscureAnswer difficult questions involving subjects such as science]], as opposed to music and pop culture like the rest of the show. The host's spiel for the category claims that because only 8% of people actually watch public television, you won't know the answer. However, there were moments when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPi2GMMbzTE a contestant correctly answered something from this category.]] Of course, the contestant in the linked clip also couldn't identify who the lead singer of Music/{{Queen}} was.

to:

* The quiz show ''Series/RemoteControl'' had a category known as "Public Television", which featured [[UnexpectedlyObscureAnswer difficult questions involving subjects such as science]], as opposed to music and pop culture like the rest of the show. The host's spiel for the category claims that because only 8% of people actually watch public television, you won't know the answer. However, there were moments when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPi2GMMbzTE a contestant correctly answered something from this category.]] Of course, the contestant in the linked clip also couldn't identify who name the lead singer of Music/{{Queen}} was.Music/{{Queen}}: you win some, you lose some.

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