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** General Tacticus' memoirs ''Veni Vidi Vici: A Soldier's Life'' in ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'' and ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'', featuring practical advice such as "When one army is within an impregnable fortress, well-garrisoned and well-stocked with provisions and the other is not - endeavor to be the one on the inside."

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** General Tacticus' memoirs ''Veni Vidi Vici: A Soldier's Life'' in ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'' ''Literature/{{Jingo}}'' and ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'', ''Literature/CarpeJugulum'', featuring practical advice such as "When one army is within an impregnable fortress, well-garrisoned and well-stocked with provisions and the other is not - endeavor to be the one on the inside."



** In ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', mention is made of the ''Art of War'', although unlike Roundworld's version, nobody remembers who wrote it. Because all the ruling classes of the Agatean Empire fight according to the Five Rules and Nine Principles, warfare is much more organised and civilised and mostly consists of short periods of excitement followed by long periods of checking the index. (The Silver Horde, on the other hand, don't fight according to any rules at all.) It's also noted that the majority of generals follow the tactics by rote, with no understanding of the logic behind them or the underlying philosophy; the result is that the country is effectively in a permanently stalemated civil war.

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** In ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', ''Literature/InterestingTimes'', mention is made of the ''Art of War'', although unlike Roundworld's version, nobody remembers who wrote it. Because all the ruling classes of the Agatean Empire fight according to the Five Rules and Nine Principles, warfare is much more organised and civilised and mostly consists of short periods of excitement followed by long periods of checking the index. (The Silver Horde, on the other hand, don't fight according to any rules at all.) It's also noted that the majority of generals follow the tactics by rote, with no understanding of the logic behind them or the underlying philosophy; the result is that the country is effectively in a permanently stalemated civil war.


** One of Guderian's self-acclaimed foremost influences, Basil Liddell-Hart, has quite the archive on armoured theory, currently in the possession of King's College London. Widely regarded as one of the greatest exponents of mechanisation, he was a driving force in helping to push Britain towards preparing for World War Two.

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** One of Guderian's self-acclaimed foremost influences, Basil Liddell-Hart, has had quite the archive on armoured theory, currently in the possession of King's College London. Widely regarded as one of the greatest exponents of mechanisation, he was a driving force in helping to push Britain towards preparing for World War Two.

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* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' features the Cole Protocol, which occasionally gets cited as a SparseListOfRules. The Cole Protocol is a bit of a {{Subversion}}, as rather than being a comprehensive guide to warfare, it is specifically about what must be done to prevent the Covenant from discovering the whereabouts of Earth and other Inner Colonies.


* As with card games and board games listed above, guidebooks for video games are very frequently this, literally so in the case of realtime strategy games.


** 27. [[TheDogShotFirst Don't be afraid to be the first to resort to violence]]. ([[http://www.schlockmercenary.com/d/20030308.html 1]])

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** 27. [[TheDogShotFirst Don't be afraid to be the first to resort to violence]].violence. ([[http://www.schlockmercenary.com/d/20030308.html 1]])

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** Not to mention the Dwarves’ Book of Grudges.

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%% Image kept on page per IP thread: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1554996828087851000

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* ''Coup d'etat: A Practical Handbook'' by Edward Luttwak. Nearly the only book on the subject of military coups d'état, giving detailed instructions on how to plan and execute the revolutionary overthrow of a government quickly and with a minimum of resistance. It includes advice on how to form cliques within the upper echelons of the military, and what persons and forces should be seized or put out of commission to ensure a successful coup. Originally written in 1968, it was revised in 2016 to include information on more modern technology, such as harnessing the power of social media to support the cause.


In RealLife, there's no easy answer. In fictionland, however, you can just ask the Big Book Of War.

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In RealLife, there's no easy answer. In fictionland, however, you can just ask the Big Book Of of War.

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** 70. [[TaughtByExperience Failure is not an option - it is mandatory. The option is whether or not to let failure be the last thing you do.]]


* Heinz Guderian wrote the book - literally - on combined arms warfare and the most effective use of tanks when he penned ''Achtung-Panzer!'' in 1936. Despite the book being heavily influenced by the writings of British strategists such as Hobart, Fuller and Liddell-Hart, the German Blitzkrieg of 1940 still caught the Allies by surprise.

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* Heinz Guderian wrote the book - literally - on combined arms warfare and the most effective use of tanks when he penned ''Achtung-Panzer!'' ''Achtung – Panzer!'' in 1936. Despite the book being heavily influenced by the writings of British strategists such as Hobart, Fuller and Liddell-Hart, the German Blitzkrieg of 1940 still caught the Allies by surprise.



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* In ''[[Literature/VorkosiganSaga The Warrior's Apprentice]]'' by Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold, Miles Vorkosigan edits an old copy of obsolete Barrayaran military regulations to serve as the regs for the mercenary fleet he's conjuring into being, eliminating all the specifically Barrayaran stuff (ceremonies for the Emperor's Birthday Review), procedures for weapons that have been obsolete for several decades, and the more hair-raising disciplinary measures[[note]]specifications for "lead-lined rubber hoses" are mentioned[[/note]]. In the process of producing a "neat, fierce little handbook for getting everybody's weapons pointed in the same direction" Miles himself winds up getting a solid education in the military organization needed to get "huge masses of properly matched men and material to the right place at the right time in the right order with the swiftness required to even grasp survival—to wrestle an infinitely complex and confusing reality into the abstract shape of victory".


A specific type of FictionalDocument (and occasionally EncyclopediaExposita), the Big Book of War is an oft-quoted, but rarely seen in its entirety, book or code which some military ([[MildlyMilitary mildly]] or otherwise) or other group follows. In addition to providing strategies for battle (and occasionally diplomacy), it frequently alludes to some kind of moral, chivalric code which its adherents are supposed to follow. Characters will frequently recite passages or rules from it when faced with some dangerous situation or conundrum. A RulesLawyer may insist on "sticking to the code" no matter what happens, while a MilitaryMaverick is more likely to shout "[[ScrewThisIndexIHaveTropes screw the code]]!" and do things his/her own way. The book in question might be Sun Tzu's ''Art of War'' but is at least as likely to be entirely fictional and specific to that organization.

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A specific type of FictionalDocument (and occasionally EncyclopediaExposita), the Big Book of War is an oft-quoted, but rarely seen in its entirety, book or code which some military ([[MildlyMilitary mildly]] or otherwise) or other group follows. In addition to providing strategies for battle (and occasionally diplomacy), it frequently alludes to some kind of moral, chivalric code which its adherents are supposed to follow. Characters will frequently recite passages or rules from it when faced with some dangerous situation or conundrum. A RulesLawyer may insist on "sticking to the code" no matter what happens, while a MilitaryMaverick is more likely to shout "[[ScrewThisIndexIHaveTropes screw the code]]!" and do things his/her own way. The book in question might be Sun Tzu's ''Art ''Literature/{{The Art of War'' War|SunTzu}}'' but is at least as likely to be entirely fictional and specific to that organization.



* [[WarriorPoet Sun Tzu's]] ''Literature/{{The Art of War|SunTzu}}'', the [[OlderThanFeudalism classic Chinese text]] and possible TropeMaker in the public consciousness, beloved by military strategists and pretended to be read by {{Nietzsche Wannabe}}s everywhere. Despite its reputation, ''The Art of War'' is quite small, particularly in the original archaic Chinese. Publications usually include explanatory commentaries from both feudal-period Chinese students and modern translators that are several times longer than the original work. Not only is it mandatorily read and studied in military academies the world over, it is also studied in many business degrees.
* Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli is responsible for NamesTheSame ''Literature/{{The Art of War|Machiavelli}}''. While not as famous as the Chinese one, it is often cited as the book that paved the way for military reforms of early modern period in Europe, bringing conscription, line infantry and logistics. It also predates Clausewitz's stance on war as extension of politics by three centuries.

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* [[WarriorPoet Sun Tzu's]] ''Literature/{{The Art of War|SunTzu}}'', the [[OlderThanFeudalism classic Chinese text]] and possible TropeMaker in the public consciousness, beloved by military strategists and pretended to be read by {{Nietzsche Wannabe}}s everywhere. Despite its reputation, ''The Art of War'' is quite small, particularly in the original archaic Chinese. Publications usually include explanatory commentaries from both feudal-period Chinese students and modern translators that are several times longer than the original work. Not only is it mandatorily mandatory to read and studied study in military academies the world over, it is also studied in many business degrees.
* Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli is responsible for NamesTheSame ''Literature/{{The Art of War|Machiavelli}}''. While not as famous as the Chinese one, it is often cited as the book that paved the way for military reforms of early modern period in Europe, bringing conscription, line infantry and logistics. It also predates Clausewitz's stance on war as extension of politics by three centuries.
degrees.



* Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli was a noted military commander for the Florentine Republic, and had a bit of a fixation on military affairs. It should come as no surprise that his book ''Literature/ThePrince'', which covers military strategy as it pertains to ruling monarchs, and his Literature/DiscoursesOnLivy, which devotes the second of its three sections chiefly to conducting war as a republic, both qualify (well, ''The Prince'' is really more like a Little Book of War, but see the bit of Sun Tzu above). Part of Machiavelli's intention is to convince his readers that the Italian city-states should not be reliant on mercenaries, and should instead build up citizen militias. His tactics were gradually amended over the years and became the basis for linear tactics--i.e. arraying your infantry in lines rather than blocks, which was standard until after Napoleon--and the modern professional army (i.e. raised from among the population of the state that fielded it; paid by the government; a rank structure; and rigorously trained and drilled). And finally he wrote an ''[[NamesTheSame Art of War]]''. It was one of the Swedish king Gustavus Adolphus's favorite books.

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* Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli was a noted military commander for the Florentine Republic, and had a bit of a fixation on military affairs. It should come as no surprise that his book ''Literature/ThePrince'', which covers military strategy as it pertains to ruling monarchs, and his Literature/DiscoursesOnLivy, which devotes the second of its three sections chiefly to conducting war as a republic, both qualify (well, ''The Prince'' is really more like a Little Book of War, but see the bit of about Sun Tzu above).above). Machiavelli is also responsible for ''Literature/{{The Art of War|Machiavelli}}'', a NamesTheSame work (in English, anyway) with Sun Tzu's. While not as famous as the Chinese one, it is often cited as the book that paved the way for military reforms of early modern period in Europe. It also predates Clausewitz's stance on war as extension of politics by three centuries. Part of Machiavelli's intention is to convince his readers that the Italian city-states should not be reliant on mercenaries, and should instead build up citizen militias. His tactics were gradually amended over the years and became the basis for linear tactics--i.e. arraying your infantry in lines rather than blocks, which was standard until after Napoleon--and the modern professional army (i.e. raised from among the population of the state that fielded it; it, paid by the government; government, utilizing a rank structure; structure, and rigorously trained and drilled). And finally he wrote an ''[[NamesTheSame Art of War]]''. It was one of the Swedish king Gustavus Adolphus's favorite books.drilled).


* [[WarriorPoet Sun Tzu's]] ''Literature/TheArtOfWar'', the [[OlderThanFeudalism classic Chinese text]] and possible TropeMaker in the public consciousness, beloved by military strategists and pretended to be read by {{Nietzsche Wannabe}}s everywhere. Despite its reputation, ''The Art of War'' is quite small, particularly in the original archaic Chinese. Publications usually include explanatory commentaries from both feudal-period chinese students and modern translators that are several times longer than the original work. Not only is it mandatorily read and studied in military academies the world over, it is also studied in many business degrees.

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* [[WarriorPoet Sun Tzu's]] ''Literature/TheArtOfWar'', ''Literature/{{The Art of War|SunTzu}}'', the [[OlderThanFeudalism classic Chinese text]] and possible TropeMaker in the public consciousness, beloved by military strategists and pretended to be read by {{Nietzsche Wannabe}}s everywhere. Despite its reputation, ''The Art of War'' is quite small, particularly in the original archaic Chinese. Publications usually include explanatory commentaries from both feudal-period chinese Chinese students and modern translators that are several times longer than the original work. Not only is it mandatorily read and studied in military academies the world over, it is also studied in many business degrees.degrees.
* Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli is responsible for NamesTheSame ''Literature/{{The Art of War|Machiavelli}}''. While not as famous as the Chinese one, it is often cited as the book that paved the way for military reforms of early modern period in Europe, bringing conscription, line infantry and logistics. It also predates Clausewitz's stance on war as extension of politics by three centuries.


* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' has Barney's Bro Code and Playbook, both of which are seen as physical books. Barney also claims that the original Bro Code was written down on the back of the Declaration of Independence. Both have been published.

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* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' has Barney's Bro Code and Playbook, both of which are seen as physical books. Barney also claims that the original Bro Code was written down on the back of the Declaration of Independence. [[{{Defictionalization}} Both have been published.]]



* ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' has The Roommate Agreement betwen Leanord and Sheldon. While often referenced (usually by Sheldon), it is never quoted in its entirety and is, apparently, hundreds of pages long. It covers such rudimentary things as who's stuff goes where in the refrigerator, as well as what happens if one of them should gain super-powers or invent time travel.

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* ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' has The Roommate Agreement betwen Leanord and Sheldon. While often referenced (usually by Sheldon), it is never quoted in its entirety and is, apparently, hundreds of pages long. It covers such rudimentary things as who's whose stuff goes where in the refrigerator, as well as what happens if one of them should gain super-powers superpowers or invent time travel.

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