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** ''Manga/DragonBall'': Even before Dragon Ball Z, the series had it's fair share of filler and padding to avoid catching up to the source material, but it gets especially bad during the Red Ribbon Army saga, perhaps reaching it's worst point in the General Blue portions, which include episodes where Goku and friends spend the whole time essentially running around in circles to escape a robot pirate, with certain shots and sequences of animation repeated over and over again. It all results in an arc that takes a lot longer to get through in the anime then it does in the manga.

to:

** ''Manga/DragonBall'': Even before Dragon Ball Z, the series had it's its fair share of filler and padding to avoid catching up to the source material, but it gets especially bad during the Red Ribbon Army saga, perhaps reaching it's its worst point in the General Blue portions, which include episodes where Goku and friends spend the whole time essentially running around in circles to escape a robot pirate, with certain shots and sequences of animation repeated over and over again. It all results in an arc that takes a lot longer to get through in the anime then than it does in the manga.



*** The Namek/Frieza Saga(s). While not the most blatant examples, they are by far the most (in)famous. Several of the episodes consisted of just characters speaking or flying from one place to another, with very few fight sequences to break it all up. One episode was just Bulma tricking two of Frieza's henchmen into looking for the dragon balls, which turned into a BLAMEpisode after the henchmen were gone since it had no impact on the saga's plot at all. "Are they still on Namek?" (The original name for this trope) has become the standard {{meme|ticMutation}} when referring to any story arc that seems to be dragging on for too long. Lampshaded in ''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged'' when Krillin randomly notes at one point that "We're ''still'' on Namek!" For reference, that was in the twenty-fourth episode, and they'd landed on Namek in the ''thirteenth episode'', while the entire Saiyan Saga was covered in ten episodes. For the record, the Frieza Saga clocked in at twenty episodes, the last of which was not half again as long, not twice as long, but ''triple'' the length of the regular TFS parody episodes, which means they actually spent approximately ''22'' episodes on Namek.

to:

*** The Namek/Frieza Saga(s). While not the most blatant examples, they are by far the most (in)famous. Several of the episodes consisted of just characters speaking or flying from one place to another, with very few fight sequences to break it all up. One episode was just Bulma tricking two of Frieza's henchmen into looking for the dragon balls, Dragon Balls, which turned into a BLAMEpisode after the henchmen were gone since it had no impact on the saga's plot at all. "Are they still on Namek?" (The original name for this trope) has become the standard {{meme|ticMutation}} when referring to any story arc that seems to be dragging on for too long. Lampshaded in ''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged'' when Krillin randomly notes at one point that "We're ''still'' on Namek!" For reference, that was in the twenty-fourth episode, and they'd landed on Namek in the ''thirteenth episode'', while the entire Saiyan Saga was covered in ten episodes. For the record, the Frieza Saga clocked in at twenty episodes, the last of which was not half again as long, not twice as long, but ''triple'' the length of the regular TFS parody episodes, which means they actually spent approximately ''22'' episodes on Namek.

Added DiffLines:

* Fans of the ''VideoGame/KisekiSeries'' got fed up with ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsOfColdSteel'' getting four whole games dedicated to the Erebonian empire where many players would rather move on towards the Calvard arc. Contrast to both ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsInTheSky'' which focused on the Liberl arc for two main games and a GaidenGame and ''VideoGame/ZeroNoKiseki'' and its sequel ''Ao No Kiseki'' which takes place in Crossbell City.


* The "Dark Seeker Saga," which is intended to be the first of several storylines in the ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' franchise, has taken the better part of ''two decades'' to fully develop. [[note]][[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI The first game]] began development in 2000 and the release date for [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsIII the final chapter]] has been slated for January 2019.[[/note]] While this wasn't in play for the [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI first]] [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsChainOfMemories three]] [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII games]] (as they developed a clear story arc of the defeat of Xehanort's Heartless and Nobody), fans started to get antsy once it became clear that Creator/SquareEnix was putting off the release of ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsIII'' until [[SequelNumberSnarl after]] the release of '''six''' additional spin-offs and an animated movie. Quite a few fans just want to be done with Xehanort so the franchise can move in a different direction, but many are bracing themselves for Xehanort to [[OverarchingVillain have a hand in steering the direction of future games]] given his status as a [[GambitRoulette ludicrously]] [[CrazyPrepared prepared]] [[TheChessmaster master schemer]] whose actions have caused many of the verse's major events.

to:

* The "Dark Seeker Saga," which is was intended to be the first of several storylines story lines in the ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' franchise, has had taken the better part of ''two decades'' to fully develop. [[note]][[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI The first game]] began development in 2000 and the release date for [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsIII the final chapter]] has had been slated for January 2019.[[/note]] While this wasn't in play for the [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI first]] [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsChainOfMemories three]] [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII games]] (as they developed a clear story arc of the defeat of Xehanort's Heartless and Nobody), fans had started to get antsy once it became clear that Creator/SquareEnix was putting off the release of ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsIII'' until [[SequelNumberSnarl after]] the release of '''six''' additional spin-offs and an animated movie. Quite a few fans just want wanted to be done with Xehanort so the franchise can could move in a different direction, but many are were bracing themselves for Xehanort to [[OverarchingVillain have a hand in steering the direction of future games]] given his status as a [[GambitRoulette ludicrously]] [[CrazyPrepared prepared]] [[TheChessmaster master schemer]] whose actions have had caused many of the verse's major events.


* While the art and storytelling of ''Franchise/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' has significantly improved following the manga's shift from ''Weekly Shonen Jump'' to ''[[{{Seinen}} Ultra Jump]]'', many can agree that it came at the cost of significantly dragging out the pace of it, due to ''Ultra Jump'' updating monthly instead of weekly. Case in point, the first ''seinen''-oriented arc, ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureSteelBallRun Steel Ball Run]]'', took seven years, two months, and 17 days to tell its story, compared to previous parts only taking two or three years[[*]]For the sake of reference, the longest installment before this was ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureDiamondIsUnbreakable Diamond Is Unbreakable]]'' at three years and seven months, only a little over half the length of ''SBR''[[/note]], and many readers have lamented the fact that ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureJoJolion JoJolion]]'' still doesn't have a clear BigBad after almost eight years.

to:

* While the art and storytelling of ''Franchise/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' has significantly improved following the manga's shift from ''Weekly Shonen Jump'' to ''[[{{Seinen}} Ultra Jump]]'', many can agree that it came at the cost of significantly dragging out the pace of it, due to ''Ultra Jump'' updating monthly instead of weekly. Case in point, the first ''seinen''-oriented arc, ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureSteelBallRun Steel Ball Run]]'', took seven years, two months, and 17 days to tell its story, compared to previous parts only taking two or three years[[*]]For years[[note]]For the sake of reference, the longest installment before this was ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureDiamondIsUnbreakable Diamond Is Unbreakable]]'' at three years and seven months, only a little over half the length of ''SBR''[[/note]], and many readers have lamented the fact that ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureJoJolion JoJolion]]'' has been in print nearly eight years and still doesn't have a clear BigBad after almost eight years.clearly defined BigBad.


* While the art and storytelling of ''Franchise/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' has significantly improved following the manga's shift from ''Weekly Shonen Jump'' to ''[[{{Seinen}} Ultra Jump]]'', many can agree that it came at the cost of significantly dragging out the pace of it, due to ''Ultra Jump'' updating monthly instead of weekly. Case in point, the first ''seinen''-oriented arc, ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureSteelBallRun Steel Ball Run]]'', took seven years, two months, and 17 days to tell its story, compared to previous parts only taking two or three years, and many readers have lamented how the main antagonist of ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureJoJolion JoJolion]]'' still hasn't been revealed after five years.

to:

* While the art and storytelling of ''Franchise/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' has significantly improved following the manga's shift from ''Weekly Shonen Jump'' to ''[[{{Seinen}} Ultra Jump]]'', many can agree that it came at the cost of significantly dragging out the pace of it, due to ''Ultra Jump'' updating monthly instead of weekly. Case in point, the first ''seinen''-oriented arc, ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureSteelBallRun Steel Ball Run]]'', took seven years, two months, and 17 days to tell its story, compared to previous parts only taking two or three years, years[[*]]For the sake of reference, the longest installment before this was ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureDiamondIsUnbreakable Diamond Is Unbreakable]]'' at three years and seven months, only a little over half the length of ''SBR''[[/note]], and many readers have lamented how the main antagonist of fact that ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureJoJolion JoJolion]]'' still hasn't been revealed doesn't have a clear BigBad after five almost eight years.


* ''Anime/DragonBallZ'': An example so infamous that they [[Anime/DragonBallKai recut the series]] just to make it more palatable.
** The Namek/Frieza Saga(s). While not the most blatant examples, they are by far the most (in)famous. Several of the episodes consisted of just characters speaking or flying from one place to another, with very few fight sequences to break it all up. One episode was just Bulma tricking two of Frieza's henchmen into looking for the dragon balls, which turned into a BLAMEpisode after the henchmen were gone since it had no impact on the saga's plot at all. "Are they still on Namek?" (The original name for this trope) has become the standard {{meme|ticMutation}} when referring to any story arc that seems to be dragging on for too long.
** The Cell Games. Midway through [[http://dragonball.wikia.com/wiki/The_Horror_Won%27t_End episode 190]], Cell starts to charge up a Kamehameha. Following a flashback, Goku telepathically tells Gohan that he can still win this, and Gohan starts preparing his own Kamehameha. The two launch their attacks right at the beginning of the next episode--and are deadlocked for the ''entire episode''. Of course, this lasted one manga chapter too, only 14 pages aren't exactly the same as 22 minutes.
** In the original manga, the Frieza and Cell sagas are of the exact same length and ''both'' the longest arcs (the Buu Saga has more chapters than both, but they tend to be a lot shorter). The Cell Saga, however, gets off lighter than the Frieza Saga simply due to actually being able to ''change location/scenery''.
** Lampshaded in ''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged'' when Krillin randomly notes at one point that "We're ''still'' on Namek!" For reference, that was in the twenty-fourth episode, and they'd landed on Namek in the ''thirteenth episode'', while the entire Saiyan Saga was covered in ten episodes. For the record, the Frieza Saga clocked in at twenty episodes, the last of which was not half again as long, not twice as long, but ''triple'' the length of the regular TFS parody episodes, which means they actually spent approximately ''22'' episodes on Namek.
** TFS' ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESDAXKC2418 Dragon Ball Z Kai Abridged Episode 2]]'' managed to condense the Frieza Saga even further down to '''seven minutes in length'''... which is still around ''three'' times longer than DBZ Kai Abridged 1, which clocks in at two minutes and 10 seconds.
* ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'':
** The Future Trunks arc is often criticized for this. There's some nice down time with Future Trunks interacting with the main universe cast once again after the end of the Cell arc, which had some good character development. On the other hand, the whole dealing with Goku Black in between this development just feels like a rinse-repeat cycle that involves Goku and Vegeta going to the future, trying to fight Black, getting stomped, and fleeing back to the past. This happens twice, while the endgame only happens on the third trip. To say noting of the main fight itself that ultimately ends up pointless in the endgame. It could've ended at several prior points, rather than the long run because Zamasu turns into this black mass of hatred that kills everyone save for the heroes with Goku having to call in the Zen-O of that timeline to wipe out Zamasu...[[DownerEnding and Future Trunks' entire timeline with it.]]
** The following arc, the [[TournamentArc Universal Survival Arc]], has been inconsistently hit with this. After a setup that took twenty episodes mostly spent gathering team members and watching the arena be built (for the former, the intro made Universe 7's whole lineup clear beforehand [[spoiler: except for Frieza replacing Buu]]), the actual tournament started and was initially well-received for its wild action and SugarWiki/VisualEffectsOfAwesome. However, as the tournament has gone on significantly longer than even the Future Trunks arc -- despite, [[InactionSequence in classic]] ''[[InactionSequence Dragon Ball]]'' [[InactionSequence fashion]], the tournament only lasting 48 minutes in-universe -- it's started to fall into fatigue territory. While some fans enjoy the unique battles and non-stop action, others have criticized many of the fights for being glorified {{Filler}} that lack plot progression or emotional impact. This reached a head when [[TheAce Jiren]] took prominence as the clear ArcVillain, doing away much of the tension and appeal of a [[TournamentArc Battle Royale]] since it's clear from early on that it will come down to a final battle between Jiren and Goku (in his latest new SuperMode) while the other battles just serve to waste time and whittle down the cast. Not helped at all by Jiren himself being a very divisive character for his [[FlatCharacter flat personality]], [[TheWorfEffect effortless]] defeating of multiple popular characters, and poorly-received FreudianExcuse.
* ''Manga/DragonBall'':
** Even before Dragon Ball Z, the series had it's fair share of filler and padding to avoid catching up to the source material, but it gets especially bad during the Red Ribbon Army saga, perhaps reaching it's worst point in the General Blue portions, which include episodes where Goku and friends spend the whole time essentially running around in circles to escape a robot pirate, with certain shots and sequences of animation repeated over and over again. It all results in an arc that takes a lot longer to get through in the anime then it does in the manga.

to:

* ''Franchise/DragonBall'':
** ''Manga/DragonBall'': Even before Dragon Ball Z, the series had it's fair share of filler and padding to avoid catching up to the source material, but it gets especially bad during the Red Ribbon Army saga, perhaps reaching it's worst point in the General Blue portions, which include episodes where Goku and friends spend the whole time essentially running around in circles to escape a robot pirate, with certain shots and sequences of animation repeated over and over again. It all results in an arc that takes a lot longer to get through in the anime then it does in the manga.
**
''Anime/DragonBallZ'': An example so infamous that they [[Anime/DragonBallKai recut the series]] just to make it more palatable.
**
palatable. In the original manga, the Frieza and Cell sagas are of the exact same length and ''both'' the longest arcs (the Buu Saga has more chapters than both, but they tend to be a lot shorter). The Cell Saga, however, gets off lighter than the Frieza Saga simply due to actually being able to ''change location/scenery''.
***
The Namek/Frieza Saga(s). While not the most blatant examples, they are by far the most (in)famous. Several of the episodes consisted of just characters speaking or flying from one place to another, with very few fight sequences to break it all up. One episode was just Bulma tricking two of Frieza's henchmen into looking for the dragon balls, which turned into a BLAMEpisode after the henchmen were gone since it had no impact on the saga's plot at all. "Are they still on Namek?" (The original name for this trope) has become the standard {{meme|ticMutation}} when referring to any story arc that seems to be dragging on for too long.
**
long. Lampshaded in ''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged'' when Krillin randomly notes at one point that "We're ''still'' on Namek!" For reference, that was in the twenty-fourth episode, and they'd landed on Namek in the ''thirteenth episode'', while the entire Saiyan Saga was covered in ten episodes. For the record, the Frieza Saga clocked in at twenty episodes, the last of which was not half again as long, not twice as long, but ''triple'' the length of the regular TFS parody episodes, which means they actually spent approximately ''22'' episodes on Namek.
***
The Cell Games. Midway through [[http://dragonball.wikia.com/wiki/The_Horror_Won%27t_End episode 190]], Cell starts to charge up a Kamehameha. Following a flashback, Goku telepathically tells Gohan that he can still win this, and Gohan starts preparing his own Kamehameha. The two launch their attacks right at the beginning of the next episode--and are deadlocked for the ''entire episode''. Of course, this lasted one manga chapter too, only 14 pages aren't exactly the same as 22 minutes.
** In the original manga, the Frieza and Cell sagas are of the exact same length and ''both'' the longest arcs (the Buu Saga has more chapters than both, but they tend to be a lot shorter). The Cell Saga, however, gets off lighter than the Frieza Saga simply due to actually being able to ''change location/scenery''.
** Lampshaded in ''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged'' when Krillin randomly notes at one point that "We're ''still'' on Namek!" For reference, that was in the twenty-fourth episode, and they'd landed on Namek in the ''thirteenth episode'', while the entire Saiyan Saga was covered in ten episodes. For the record, the Frieza Saga clocked in at twenty episodes, the last of which was not half again as long, not twice as long, but ''triple'' the length of the regular TFS parody episodes, which means they actually spent approximately ''22'' episodes on Namek.
**
*** TFS' ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESDAXKC2418 Dragon Ball Z Kai Abridged Episode 2]]'' managed to condense the Frieza Saga even further down to '''seven minutes in length'''... which is still around ''three'' times longer than DBZ Kai Abridged 1, which clocks in at two minutes and 10 seconds.
* ** ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'':
** *** The Future Trunks arc is often criticized for this. There's some nice down time with Future Trunks interacting with the main universe cast once again after the end of the Cell arc, which had some good character development. On the other hand, the whole dealing with Goku Black in between this development just feels like a rinse-repeat cycle that involves Goku and Vegeta going to the future, trying to fight Black, getting stomped, and fleeing back to the past. This happens twice, while the endgame only happens on the third trip. To say noting of the main fight itself that ultimately ends up pointless in the endgame. It could've ended at several prior points, rather than the long run because Zamasu turns into this black mass of hatred that kills everyone save for the heroes with Goku having to call in the Zen-O of that timeline to wipe out Zamasu...[[DownerEnding and Future Trunks' entire timeline with it.]]
** *** The following arc, the [[TournamentArc Universal Survival Arc]], has been inconsistently hit with this. After a setup that took twenty episodes mostly spent gathering team members and watching the arena be built (for the former, the intro made Universe 7's whole lineup clear beforehand [[spoiler: except for Frieza replacing Buu]]), the actual tournament started and was initially well-received for its wild action and SugarWiki/VisualEffectsOfAwesome. However, as the tournament has gone on significantly longer than even the Future Trunks arc -- despite, [[InactionSequence in classic]] ''[[InactionSequence Dragon Ball]]'' [[InactionSequence fashion]], the tournament only lasting 48 minutes in-universe -- it's started to fall into fatigue territory. While some fans enjoy the unique battles and non-stop action, others have criticized many of the fights for being glorified {{Filler}} that lack plot progression or emotional impact. This reached a head when [[TheAce Jiren]] took prominence as the clear ArcVillain, doing away much of the tension and appeal of a [[TournamentArc Battle Royale]] since it's clear from early on that it will come down to a final battle between Jiren and Goku (in his latest new SuperMode) while the other battles just serve to waste time and whittle down the cast. Not helped at all by Jiren himself being a very divisive character for his [[FlatCharacter flat personality]], [[TheWorfEffect effortless]] defeating of multiple popular characters, and poorly-received FreudianExcuse.
* ''Manga/DragonBall'':
** Even before Dragon Ball Z, the series had it's fair share of filler and padding to avoid catching up to the source material, but it gets especially bad during the Red Ribbon Army saga, perhaps reaching it's worst point in the General Blue portions, which include episodes where Goku and friends spend the whole time essentially running around in circles to escape a robot pirate, with certain shots and sequences of animation repeated over and over again. It all results in an arc that takes a lot longer to get through in the anime then it does in the manga.
FreudianExcuse.


* In ''Fanfic/TheStalkingZukoSeries'', the second installment, "Not Stalking Zuko" mainly takes place on Ember Island- for those who aren't familiar with the series, that was the setting of the recap episode between "The Southern Raiders" (when Zuko and Katara finally became friends) and the four-part GrandFinale. It takes almost half of "Not Stalking Zuko," the longest installment in the series, to get up to "The Ember Island Players," and there's still more than a few chapters to go before it gets up to "Sozin's Comet."



[[folder:Fan Fiction]]
* ''Fanfic/TheStalkingZukoSeries'' has a fairly slow-paced romance arc between Zuko and Katara. They do work out their differences by the end of the first installment, and Katara gradually realizes her feelings for Zuko over the course of the second, but since the author chose to stick to TheStationsOfTheCanon, Katara doesn't confess for a long time. Katara does confess after Zuko's Agni Kai with Azula, but [[TraumaInducedAmnesia he ends up forgetting said confession as a result of his near-death experience]] and ends up getting back together with Mai for a little while. As a result of that and various other factors, such as Hakoda's disapproval of Katara seeing Zuko, Katara doesn't confess again until near the end of the series.
[[/folder]]



** Legion did indeed feature the Alliance and Horde keeping their differences at bay long enough to defeat the Burning Legion, but the aftermath of Sargeras's defeat reignited the feud. In the next expansion, Battle for Azeroth, the Alliance/Horde conflict promises to be the ''focus'' of the storyline rather than a distraction from some other world-ending threat.

to:

** Legion did indeed feature the Alliance and Horde keeping putting their differences at bay aside long enough to defeat the Burning Legion, but the aftermath of Sargeras's defeat reignited the feud. In the next expansion, Battle for Azeroth, the Alliance/Horde conflict promises to be the ''focus'' of the storyline rather than a distraction from some other world-ending threat.


** Reports of the arc finishing may be premature - It is still going on and resisting attempts at a tidy resolution as of April 2019.


* The "Godsmoot/vampire Durkon" arc in ''WebComic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' lasted a while (beginning in earnest in March 2014 and climaxing on October 2019). A lot of fans expressed frustration at how long the comic was spending on a side story -- until the arc concluded in a way that made it essential to the main story with a twist that no-one saw coming.

to:

* The "Godsmoot/vampire Durkon" arc in ''WebComic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' lasted a while (beginning in earnest in March 2014 and climaxing on October 2019).2018). A lot of fans expressed frustration at how long the comic was spending on a side story -- until the arc concluded in a way that made it essential to the main story with a twist that no-one saw coming.


* The "Godsmoot/vampire Durkon" arc in ''WebComic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' lasted a while. A lot of fans expressed frustration at how long the comic was spending on a side story -- until the arc concluded in a way that made it essential to the main story with a twist that no-one saw coming.

to:

* The "Godsmoot/vampire Durkon" arc in ''WebComic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' lasted a while. while (beginning in earnest in March 2014 and climaxing on October 2019). A lot of fans expressed frustration at how long the comic was spending on a side story -- until the arc concluded in a way that made it essential to the main story with a twist that no-one saw coming.coming.
** Reports of the arc finishing may be premature - It is still going on and resisting attempts at a tidy resolution as of April 2019.


** The Namek/Frieza Saga(s). While not the most blatant examples, they are by far the most (in)famous. Several of the episodes consisted of just characters speaking or flying from one place to another, with very few fight sequences to break it all up. One episode was just Bulma tricking two of Frieza's henchmen into looking for the dragon balls, which turned into a BLAMEpisode after the henchmen were gone since it had no impact on the saga's plot at all. "Are they still on Namek?" has become the standard {{meme|ticMutation}} when referring to any story arc that seems to be dragging on for too long.

to:

** The Namek/Frieza Saga(s). While not the most blatant examples, they are by far the most (in)famous. Several of the episodes consisted of just characters speaking or flying from one place to another, with very few fight sequences to break it all up. One episode was just Bulma tricking two of Frieza's henchmen into looking for the dragon balls, which turned into a BLAMEpisode after the henchmen were gone since it had no impact on the saga's plot at all. "Are they still on Namek?" (The original name for this trope) has become the standard {{meme|ticMutation}} when referring to any story arc that seems to be dragging on for too long.


* The ''AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho'' Divergent arc, in which the Eighth Doctor was trapped in an alternate universe without access to time and space travel, lasted only eight audios/a little over a year but ''felt'' like it dragged on and on for years, made worse by the fact that its very premise negated one of the main joys of ''Doctor Who''. It apparently wore down Creator/PaulMcGann so much that he considered leaving the role. It was killed, but more because of worries about the future of Big Finish in light of the new series getting the go-ahead than because of anything else, leading to it having a somewhat abrupt and unsatisfying ending.

to:

* The ''AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho'' Divergent arc, in which the Eighth Doctor was trapped in an alternate universe without access to time and space travel, lasted only eight audios/a little over a year but ''felt'' like it dragged on and on for years, made worse by the fact that its very premise negated one of the main joys of ''Doctor Who''. It apparently wore down Creator/PaulMcGann so much that he considered leaving the role. It was killed, but more because of worries about the future of Big Finish in light of the new series getting the go-ahead than because of anything else, else. After all it might have turned off potential new listeners if the on-going story with the newest incarnation of the Doctor, saw him trapped in another, completely different universe, leading [[MakeRoomForTheNewPlot the arc to it having have a somewhat abrupt and unsatisfying ending.ending so the Doctor could return to the original universe]].


* Manga/''{{Dragonball}}'':

to:

* Manga/''{{Dragonball}}'':''Manga/DragonBall'':


* Manga/''DragonBall'':
** Even before Dragon Ball Z, the series had it's fair share of filler and padding to avoid catching up to the source material, but it gets especially bad during the Red Ribbon Army saga, perhaps reaching it's worst point in the General Blue Saga, which includes episodes where Goku and friends spend the whole time running from a robot pirate, with certain shots and sequences of animation repeated over and over again. It all results in an arc that takes a lot longer to get through in the anime then it does in the manga.

to:

* Manga/''DragonBall'':
Manga/''{{Dragonball}}'':
** Even before Dragon Ball Z, the series had it's fair share of filler and padding to avoid catching up to the source material, but it gets especially bad during the Red Ribbon Army saga, perhaps reaching it's worst point in the General Blue Saga, portions, which includes include episodes where Goku and friends spend the whole time essentially running from around in circles to escape a robot pirate, with certain shots and sequences of animation repeated over and over again. It all results in an arc that takes a lot longer to get through in the anime then it does in the manga.

Added DiffLines:

* Manga/''DragonBall'':
** Even before Dragon Ball Z, the series had it's fair share of filler and padding to avoid catching up to the source material, but it gets especially bad during the Red Ribbon Army saga, perhaps reaching it's worst point in the General Blue Saga, which includes episodes where Goku and friends spend the whole time running from a robot pirate, with certain shots and sequences of animation repeated over and over again. It all results in an arc that takes a lot longer to get through in the anime then it does in the manga.

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