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La Divina Tragedia!![[Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame Disney version]]

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La Divina Tragedia!![[Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame Tragedia!![[WesternAnimation/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame Disney version]]



** You know they did stuff like this in ''{{Disney/Aladdin}}'' and everyone just thought it was funny, right?

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** You know they did stuff like this in ''{{Disney/Aladdin}}'' ''{{WesternAnimation/Aladdin}}'' and everyone just thought it was funny, right?



** Also, there's a trend with many of the Disney Renaissance movies...during the climax, the hero, at one moment or another, has the perfect opportunity to kill the villain, but decides not to, often along the lines of "I'm not a man like you." Afterwards, the villain will attempt to kill the hero, often in the most absurd way possible, resulting in his death, which he [[{{Hoist by His Own Petard}} inevitably brought upon himself.]] Its seen in ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast'', ''Disney/TheLionKing'', ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'', and ''Disney/{{Tarzan}}''.
*** ''Very'' good observation; exceptions include ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'', ''Disney/{{Aladdin}}'', ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'' (where it would have been impossible anyway), and ''Disney/{{Mulan}}''.

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** Also, there's a trend with many of the Disney Renaissance movies...during the climax, the hero, at one moment or another, has the perfect opportunity to kill the villain, but decides not to, often along the lines of "I'm not a man like you." Afterwards, the villain will attempt to kill the hero, often in the most absurd way possible, resulting in his death, which he [[{{Hoist by His Own Petard}} inevitably brought upon himself.]] Its seen in ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast'', ''Disney/TheLionKing'', ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'', ''WesternAnimation/BeautyAndTheBeast'', ''WesternAnimation/TheLionKing1994'', ''WesternAnimation/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'', and ''Disney/{{Tarzan}}''.
''WesternAnimation/{{Tarzan}}''.
*** ''Very'' good observation; exceptions include ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'', ''Disney/{{Aladdin}}'', ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'' ''WesternAnimation/TheLittleMermaid1'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Aladdin}}'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Hercules}}'' (where it would have been impossible anyway), and ''Disney/{{Mulan}}''.''WesternAnimation/{{Mulan}}''.



** And see the climax of ''{{Disney/Tangled}}'' where, even after learning that Gothel kidnapped her and emotionally abused her for years (as well as stabbing her lover right in front of her) all for her hair, Rapunzel still instinctively throws her arms out to save Gothel when she falls out the tower window. Frollo has spent years being Quasi's abuser but also his only father figure. A relationship like that is very complicated, and the feelings towards it even more so - especially after the victim has finally realised that the abuser is an abuser. If Quasi had killed Frollo then and there, he'd alternate between relief and guilt because - abuser or not - he'd have killed his only father.

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** And see the climax of ''{{Disney/Tangled}}'' ''{{WesternAnimation/Tangled}}'' where, even after learning that Gothel kidnapped her and emotionally abused her for years (as well as stabbing her lover right in front of her) all for her hair, Rapunzel still instinctively throws her arms out to save Gothel when she falls out the tower window. Frollo has spent years being Quasi's abuser but also his only father figure. A relationship like that is very complicated, and the feelings towards it even more so - especially after the victim has finally realised that the abuser is an abuser. If Quasi had killed Frollo then and there, he'd alternate between relief and guilt because - abuser or not - he'd have killed his only father.



** During TheMiddleAges, gypsies were stereotyped as notorious con artists who stole money, kidnapped children (Like Sarousch in [[Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDameII the sequel]]) and had fortune tellings, palm readings etc. That sort of thing was considered witchcraft, which is unholy in Frollo's mind. And he was hardly the only one who hated gypsies in those days. He just happens to be in a position of power where he can actually do something about it. Essentially he believed they were all heathens and criminals.

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** During TheMiddleAges, gypsies were stereotyped as notorious con artists who stole money, kidnapped children (Like Sarousch in [[Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDameII [[WesternAnimation/TheHunchbackOfNotreDameII the sequel]]) and had fortune tellings, palm readings etc. That sort of thing was considered witchcraft, which is unholy in Frollo's mind. And he was hardly the only one who hated gypsies in those days. He just happens to be in a position of power where he can actually do something about it. Essentially he believed they were all heathens and criminals.

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** The guard specifically states that Esmeralda is "nowhere in the cathedral". I always assumed the archdeacon found her missing and, knowing Frollo to be unjust, went to the guards to accuse them of violating Sanctuary and somehow taking her away anyhow. The guards, having not had anything to do with it, would put two and two together--if ''they'' don't have her, and ''we'' don't have her, then that means...


** Don't know why you couldn't look this up yourself, but Wikipedia says the building underwent reconstruction during the 1800s.

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** Don't know why you couldn't look this up yourself, but Wikipedia says the building underwent reconstruction during the 1800s.1800s. If that wasn't the cause of the discrepancy, it is a fictional depiction of the building, so it can look however the filmmakers would like it to.

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** Don't know why you couldn't look this up yourself, but Wikipedia says the building underwent reconstruction during the 1800s.


* the Palace of Justice, the place where Frollo sent those gypsies appears as an gothic castle in the movie, in real life present day Paris, it's now look like a Baroque building, what happened to the original?

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* the Palace of Justice, the place where Frollo sent those arrested gypsies there appears as an gothic castle in the movie, in real life present day Paris, it's now look like a Baroque building, what happened to the original?

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* the Palace of Justice, the place where Frollo sent those gypsies appears as an gothic castle in the movie, in real life present day Paris, it's now look like a Baroque building, what happened to the original?

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** Maybe someone spotted her in the street and reported it? It's not just Frollo and his guards who are prejudiced to the gypsies. Perhaps some concerned parent caught a glimpse of Esmerelda before she disguised herself and ran to tell the guards.


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** There's also a nice GeniusBonus if you know the real intent behind Victor Hugo writing the novel in the first place. He wrote it so that people would be motivated to preserve architecture, because it is a living remnant of history, and lasts longer than human life. Frollo unroots a piece of the Palace just to make his point - that he doesn't value the historical significance of the building, and therefore it's another reason to dislike him.


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** When she spits at him, he announces to the crowd that she "has refused to recant". To the misinformed public, he's offering her a chance to repent for her sins as a witch. If she does, she'll be spared.


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** And see the climax of ''{{Disney/Tangled}}'' where, even after learning that Gothel kidnapped her and emotionally abused her for years (as well as stabbing her lover right in front of her) all for her hair, Rapunzel still instinctively throws her arms out to save Gothel when she falls out the tower window. Frollo has spent years being Quasi's abuser but also his only father figure. A relationship like that is very complicated, and the feelings towards it even more so - especially after the victim has finally realised that the abuser is an abuser. If Quasi had killed Frollo then and there, he'd alternate between relief and guilt because - abuser or not - he'd have killed his only father.


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** And the fact that ethnic groups in real life aren't all black and white (excuse the pun). There are some good and some bad, and unfortunately extremists use the bad as excuses to persecute everyone (there's more to it in real life of course, but that's the basis in this film). Esmerelda sides with the oppressed not because they are angels or impossibly perfect, but because it is their basic human right to not be persecuted for their race. If they weren't persecuted, then they wouldn't have to have a secret hideout that anyone discovering could result in their execution.
** There's also a nice PersecutionFlip, albeit a minor one. The gypsies have been stereotyped and written off as thieves, heathens, criminals etc - so they respond by stereotyping the others as racist persecutors. It all goes to show that stereotyping and demonising the group for the actions of the individual is going to result in the suffering of innocent people.


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** If you think about it, a baby is a lot of work to take care of. Frollo can't have done it all himself. As noted above, he may have found a nurse to do the necessary in the early days. And other people in the church would definitely hear a baby's crying. And I can't see why the Archdeacon would keep quiet about there being a child raised in the cathedral.


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** Someone else probably used him. It was the master that committed those crimes, not the horse.


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** The cynical suggestion is that she was thrown in some unmarked grave or burned. The more optimistic suggestion is that the Archdeacon saw she got a proper burial, although he wouldn't know her name to mark her grave.

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** There's also a likelihood that Quasimodo's father might have been white. The man who is with Quasimodo's mother could have been her (new) lover or a relative.


*** That man was worried about their well-being. The "Shut it up will you!" Line can be understandable in a life and death situation.

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*** That man was worried about their well-being. The "Shut it up will you!" Line can be understandable in a life and death situation.


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*** Especially one that was kidnapped soley to spite society.


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*** They'll redeem themselves with a more "respectfull" individual serving as their leader.


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** It was also Frollo's means of publicity. (how it worked in the 1480's thats is..) Both buring the cottage and Pheobus rescuing the family drew attention from locals. In doing away with Pheobus immediantly afterwards, Frollo is saying to everyone "Don't get any ideas people! This man may have saved this family, but he won't be doing the same for you!"

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** And Esmerelda may have known that it was Frollo's RESPONCABILTY to intervane in situations that like that. (Which is probably why he had to attend the festival in the first place, despite how much he loathes it.) Both refusing to help poor Quasimodo, AND objecting to her intervention, soley because Quasi is deformed (she didn't know of their pre-existing affiliations yet at this point) demonstrates that he's as unfairlly spiteful to the deformed as he is to Gypies. And how he rigged the justice system to benifit himself in that regard. Both of these are used in her speech ("You misstreat this poor boy the SAME way you misstreat my people! You speak of justice, and yet you are CRUEL to those in need of youre help!")

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** Several hours have passed since Esmerelda rescued him from the river and got to the bell tower. Enough time for Frollo to burn large areas of Paris. So she probably had to duck and hide into various places on the way to Notre Dame. This bought her enough time to patch Pheobus' wounds in the back. By the time she got him to the bell tower, the smaller wound in the front is all that was needed attention.

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** And Esmerelda would be betraying her friends and family if she DID take the chance anyway. Frollo still had Pheobus and the gypsies as prisoners, so he was still gonna have THEM executed. Honor before reason is why she spits in Frollo's face (That and the obvious fact that the idea is just disgusting.)

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** Phoebus has also fought in an acctual WAR! Surely he of all people could tell FIGHTING a genuine threat from BEING a genuine threat. Frollo's means of persecuting the public to find ONE gypsy girl is clearly the latter.

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**Plus turning herself in could make matters worse. If she did present herself to Frollo admiting defeat, he wouldn't buy it. He'd suspect she was up to shrewd dispicable strategy of some sort. He IS accussing her of being a witch! He'd prolong his public torture exclusively as a means to interigate her, or worse! All I know is that the LAST THING Frollo would EVER expect from a gypsy, or anyone he's charging of witchcraft, is a GENUINE NO-STRINGS ATTACHED SURENDER.

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