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* ''Series/YearsAndYears''

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* StepfordSmiler: Both the Ninth and Tenth Doctors were this, due to their guilt about what they did in the Time War, Ten more so than Nine. Most of the main characters of ''Torchwood'' are this to a degree, too.


** During the classic series, less focus was put on the Cybermen's aim of assimilation, and they became generic robotic soldiers, often displaying being downright emotional as well. In the new series, the emphasis was placed on the BodyHorror and LossOfIdentity aspects of their nature, more like their debut appearance.




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* CharacterCheck: Applied this to characters he brought back in ''DW'''s revival.
** Over the course of the classic series, the Daleks grew from a single-minded race united under an emperor or other leader to a conflicted race fighting a civil war amongst themselves, largely due to the introduction of Davros, who played his army of Daleks against the rest. When they reappeared in the new series, the Time War backstory completely removed all mentions of infighting between themselves, and Davros does not appear for several seasons. Their stripped-down and muted design in the new series also harkens back to their first appearances in the 1960s, rather than the more colorful and trimmed looks in the later eras of the classic show.
** The John Simm's Master's first appearance harkens back to the original/Delgado master by not having a decaying body, pulling a GrandTheftMe, or having any worries about his mortality, and being only concerned with evil and power, unlike the previous incarnations from Pratt onward. In his second appearance, after his resurrection, he again has a decaying body.
*** The [[NewPowersAsThePlotDemands unexplained]] [[LovecraftianSuperpower Lovecraftian Superpowers]] he had in the TV movie are also never brought up.
** The TARDIS started out broken; completely unsteerable to the point where the Doctor can never leave a place and time that he's not completely done with, because he can never return. During the Fourth Doctor's tenure, he switched to using the "secondary control room", which allowed him to steer the TARDIS for the first time ([[FanWank onscreen, anyway]]), although due to his personality he often wouldn't and even installed a "Randomiser" to make control of it impossible again. The new series establishes right from the very beginning that the Doctor knows how to fly his TARDIS now, showing it capable of maneuvers stated to be completely impossible for most of the Classic Doctors (the earliest example being the Ninth Doctor's AndAnotherThing rematerialization in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E1Rose Rose]]"), but every so often a story will start with the Doctor mis-steering the TARDIS and ending up somewhere unwanted, such as "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E7TheIdiotsLantern The Idiot's Lantern]]" ('50s Britain and not '50s America), "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E2ToothAndClaw Tooth and Claw]]" (the Victorian era rather than the '70s), and completely {{Deconstructed}} in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E4AliensOfLondon Aliens of London]]" (a year after Rose left instead of a few hours).


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Was awarded an OBE in 2008.

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Was awarded an OBE [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever OBE]] in 2008.


Davies has written several ''Doctor Who'' episodes and specials over his tenure as producer, and been responsible for rewrites on many more. He has now stepped down from the position following the conclusion of production on the Creator/DavidTennant era, handing the reins to Creator/StevenMoffat.

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Davies has written several ''Doctor Who'' episodes and specials over his tenure as producer, and been responsible for rewrites on many more. He has now stepped down from the position following the conclusion of production on the Creator/DavidTennant era, handing the reins to Creator/StevenMoffat.


The TARDIS' police box design. At first, in TheSixties, it wasn't anachronistic, but nowadays, characters ask "What is a 'police public call box?'" and the broken chameleon circuit, though part of the setting from day one to a smaller degree[[note]]The First Doctor noticed the TARDIS hadn't adapted to its new location once they ''left'' Earth, and it was the first sign that something was wrong. They wound up with the more pressing problem of not being able to control their destination.[[/note]], is sometimes a running gag (It's fixed! ...and its new form is not under the Doctor's control, highly inconvenient, and at least you know where to ''enter'' the police box version. It's fixed! ...and when it scans the area and decides on an "appropriate" form, it's always a police box. Or Donna can fix it with her new Time Lord knowledge! ...which is about to burn out her brain, and what comes next is ''not funny.'') and the Doctor has at least once admitted that he could probably fix it if he really wanted to, but likes it the way it is. Davies's era introduced (and [[TropeNamer named]]) the idea that the TARDIS has a PerceptionFilter that makes people not notice it even if its apparent form isn't period-appropriate.

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** The TARDIS' police box design. At first, in TheSixties, it wasn't anachronistic, but nowadays, characters ask "What is a 'police public call box?'" and the broken chameleon circuit, though part of the setting from day one to a smaller degree[[note]]The First Doctor noticed the TARDIS hadn't adapted to its new location once they ''left'' Earth, and it was the first sign that something was wrong. They wound up with the more pressing problem of not being able to control their destination.[[/note]], is sometimes a running gag (It's fixed! ...and its new form is not under the Doctor's control, highly inconvenient, and at least you know where to ''enter'' the police box version. It's fixed! ...and when it scans the area and decides on an "appropriate" form, it's always a police box. Or Donna can fix it with her new Time Lord knowledge! ...which is about to burn out her brain, and what comes next is ''not funny.'') and the Doctor has at least once admitted that he could probably fix it if he really wanted to, but likes it the way it is. Davies's era introduced (and [[TropeNamer named]]) the idea that the TARDIS has a PerceptionFilter that makes people not notice it even if its apparent form isn't period-appropriate.

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* ReimaginingTheArtifact: Pulled this off with a few different elements while resurrecting ''Doctor Who'':
** The Daleks had suffered some extreme VillainDecay by the end of the Classic series, becoming quite easily explodable and harmless even in great numbers, as well as having no agency thanks to the introduction of their leader, Davros. This was not helped by the species being a UK cultural meme for forty years - impressions of their obnoxious, squawky voices and jokes about their use of [[SpecialEffectsFailure plungers]] [[ImprobableWeaponUser as weapons]] and (imagined) inability to climb stairs were something of a hack comedian standard routine. The new series reintroduced the Daleks in the episode "Dalek", in which we find out that the Dalek race was on the brink of annihilating the Doctor's race, and the Doctor had to commit genocide against both species in order to save the universe itself - the Dalek in the episode gets a much less shrill, much scarier and much more expressive voice than the original series Daleks had, is treated realistically as the death machine that it is, and incorporated elements from the very first Dalek serial (such as the idea of Daleks as objects of pity as well as revulsion) in order to make them just as terrifying as they had first been forty years ago. Throughout both Davies' (and later Moffat's) showrunning of the revival era, there's also been an added emphasis on delving into the psychology of the Daleks and the Doctor's relationship with them. (For example, they claim they grew stronger in fear of him. He's tempted by them to lose his temper several times, and also ponders in private whether he could maybe redeem them one day, somehow.) This effort helped the Daleks return to the sort of nuance and cred they had as antagonists back in the 60s and 70s. And Davros, previously overused in the classic era after his first appearance, has had a guest role in only one story during RTD's run.
The TARDIS' police box design. At first, in TheSixties, it wasn't anachronistic, but nowadays, characters ask "What is a 'police public call box?'" and the broken chameleon circuit, though part of the setting from day one to a smaller degree[[note]]The First Doctor noticed the TARDIS hadn't adapted to its new location once they ''left'' Earth, and it was the first sign that something was wrong. They wound up with the more pressing problem of not being able to control their destination.[[/note]], is sometimes a running gag (It's fixed! ...and its new form is not under the Doctor's control, highly inconvenient, and at least you know where to ''enter'' the police box version. It's fixed! ...and when it scans the area and decides on an "appropriate" form, it's always a police box. Or Donna can fix it with her new Time Lord knowledge! ...which is about to burn out her brain, and what comes next is ''not funny.'') and the Doctor has at least once admitted that he could probably fix it if he really wanted to, but likes it the way it is. Davies's era introduced (and [[TropeNamer named]]) the idea that the TARDIS has a PerceptionFilter that makes people not notice it even if its apparent form isn't period-appropriate.
** The Cybermen started out fairly scary for the 60s, with their emotionless desire to convert other beings into more Cybermen. As time went by, less focus was put on the assimilation aspect of their personalities, and they became generic robotic soldiers, often openly displaying emotions as well. When they reappeared in the new series (as parallel universe counterparts that never had the originals' {{Weaksauce Weakness}}es), much more focus was placed on the BodyHorror and LossOfIdentity aspects of their nature, making them scary once more. The way of defeating them went from 'throw gold coins at them' to 'give them their emotions back,' creating heart-wrenching scenes of Cybermen screaming in agony, dropping dead, or outright exploding as they were destroyed by the sheer horror of what they'd become. (However, VillainDecay set in once again as this became easier to do.)


* ArcVillain: Each of his [[HalfArcSeason Half-Arc Seasons]] had them:

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* ArcVillain: Each of his [[HalfArcSeason Half-Arc Seasons]] in ''Doctor Who'' had them:



* NoodleIncident: He'll reference these, oftentimes for comedy, but other tiems for more dramatic purposes, see the entry for Nothing Is Scarier below.

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* ANaziByAnyOtherName: Nazi-esque villains do tend to pop up in his stories:
** The Daleks have always been like this, and Davies sticks to that very well. It was even lampshaded in the 2008 episode "Journey's End" where Martha teleports to Germany to play her part in activating the Osterhagen Key, and Daleks can be heard shouting in German '''"Exterminieren!"'''
** In "The End of Time", the Master transforms everyone on Earth into copies of himself (a blonde, blue-eyed Caucasian man) and then declares that "There is no human race. There is only the ''Master'' race!"
** In "Turn Left", an alternate-universe version of Britain is ruled by a fascist government that, among other things, ends up transporting immigrants to "labor camps". WWII veteran Wilf spots the resemblance.
* NoodleIncident: He'll reference these, oftentimes for comedy, but other tiems times for more dramatic purposes, see the entry for Nothing Is Scarier below.


!! Tropes in his work in the Whoniverse (''Doctor Who'', ''Torchwood'', ''The Sarah Jane Adventures'' the Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse) :

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!! Tropes Recurring and over-arching tropes in his work in the Whoniverse work (''Doctor Who'', ''Torchwood'', ''The Sarah Jane Adventures'' the Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse) :



* AttackOfTheKillerWhatever: He frequently creates monsters and threats out of innocuous Earth things: mannequins, stretches of skin, game shows, Santa Clauses and Christmas trees, monks, little old ladies, giant crabs, angels, human fat, beetles, manta rays, water... and that's just ''Doctor Who''.

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* AttackOfTheKillerWhatever: He frequently creates monsters and threats out of innocuous Earth things: mannequins, stretches of skin, game shows, Santa Clauses and Christmas trees, monks, little old ladies, giant crabs, angels, human fat, GPSs, beetles, manta rays, water... and that's just ''Doctor Who''.

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* ArcVillain: Each of his [[HalfArcSeason Half-Arc Seasons]] had them:
** The Daleks were indirectly this for Season 1: Their attack in the season finale caused the Bad Wolf message to spread through time and space, connecting to past episodes.
** The Cybermen for Season 2, given how they first appear mid-season, and then come back for the season finale.
** The Master for Season 3, who was manipulating events on present-day Earth the entire season, and revealed himself enacted his plans in the finale.
** The Daleks and Davros for Season 4, whose plans for the destruction of all reality left fingerprints through several episodes of the season.
** Both the Master and Rassilon with the Time Lords were this for the 2009 series of specials, seeing as how they were both involved in a prophecy that haunted the Doctor through the specials.

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