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''Marvel Mystery Comics'' (Oct. 1939-Aug. 1957, 159 issues) was the first superhero comic book published by Timely Comics, which would eventually become known as Creator/MarvelComics. The first issue is the debut of both the ComicBook/SubMariner (created by Bill Everett) and the [[ComicBook/HumanTorch1939 Human Torch]] (created by Carl Burgos).[[note]]Similar in name and powers, but unrelated to the more famous [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Johnny Storm]] from decades later. This early torch would eventually be given the name Jim Hammond[[/note]]

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''Marvel Mystery Comics'' (Oct. 1939-Aug. 1957, 159 issues) was the first superhero comic book published by Timely Comics, which would eventually become known as Creator/MarvelComics. The first issue is the debut of both the ComicBook/SubMariner (created by Bill Everett) and the [[ComicBook/HumanTorch1939 Human Torch]] (created by Carl Burgos).[[note]]Similar in name and powers, but unrelated to the more famous [[ComicBook/FantasticFour [[ComicBook/HumanTorch Johnny Storm]] from decades later. This early torch would eventually be given the name Jim Hammond[[/note]]




In 2019, in celebration of [[MilestoneCelebration its 80th anniversary]], Marvel Comics released ''ComicBook/MarvelComicsOneThousand'', which retroactively established [[LegacyCharacter a legacy for the Masked Raider]] by revealing his mask is actually cosmic in origin.



* BreakoutCharacter: Both the Human Torch and the Sub-Mariner got their start in this series, and both ended up getting their own individual comics. Human Torch would also make appearances in the original ''Captain America'' comics, issues of ''All Select Comics'', ''All Winners Comics'', ''Daring Comics'', ''Mystic Comics'', and ''Young Allies'' Comics. Even after their original series folded, Torch would get a [[LegacyCharacter successor]] in the form of [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Johnny Storm.]]

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* BreakoutCharacter: Both the Human Torch and the Sub-Mariner got their start in this series, and both ended up getting their own individual comics. Human Torch would also make appearances in the original ''Captain America'' comics, issues of ''All Select Comics'', ''All Winners Comics'', ''Daring Comics'', ''Mystic Comics'', and ''Young Allies'' Comics. Even after their original series folded, Torch would get a [[LegacyCharacter successor]] in the form of [[ComicBook/FantasticFour the ComicBook/FantasticFour's [[ComicBook/HumanTorch Johnny Storm.]]



* HumanPopsicle: The Torch's creator, once he discovered his defect that sets him ablaze, seals him inside a block of concrete with no air and buries him underground until he can find a way to fix his defect. Some time after, an air shaft and crack forms in the concrete, giving the torch just enough oxygen to trigger his fire abilities and break free.

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* HumanPopsicle: The Torch's creator, once he discovered his defect that sets him ablaze, seals him inside a block of concrete with no air and buries him underground until he can find a way to fix his defect. Some time after, an air shaft and crack forms in the concrete, giving the torch Torch just enough oxygen to trigger his fire abilities and break free.



* TragicMonster: While the Human Torch definetely wasn't evil, his initial appearance was a far cry from that of a superhero--his fire abilities unwittingly cause a lot of destruction, and he even accidentally kills someone.

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* TragicMonster: While the Human Torch definetely definitely wasn't evil, his initial appearance was a far cry from that of a superhero--his fire abilities unwittingly cause a lot of destruction, and he even accidentally kills someone.


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* NonPoweredCostumedHero: The Angel, a vigilante with a suspiciously familiar blue suit, yellow ChestInsignia, and red cape, has no powers, just a lot of derring-do.


''Marvel Mystery Comics'' (Oct. 1939-Aug. 1957, 159 issues) was the first superhero comic book published by Timely Comics, which would eventually become known as Creator/MarvelComics. The first issue is the debut of both the ComicBook/SubMariner (created by Bill Everett) and the [[ComicBook/TheHUmanTorch1939 Human Torch]] (created by Carl Burgos).[[note]]Similar in name and powers, but unrelated to the more famous [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Johnny Storm]] from decades later. This early torch would eventually be given the name Jim Hammond[[/note]]

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''Marvel Mystery Comics'' (Oct. 1939-Aug. 1957, 159 issues) was the first superhero comic book published by Timely Comics, which would eventually become known as Creator/MarvelComics. The first issue is the debut of both the ComicBook/SubMariner (created by Bill Everett) and the [[ComicBook/TheHUmanTorch1939 [[ComicBook/HumanTorch1939 Human Torch]] (created by Carl Burgos).[[note]]Similar in name and powers, but unrelated to the more famous [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Johnny Storm]] from decades later. This early torch would eventually be given the name Jim Hammond[[/note]]


''Marvel Mystery Comics'' (Oct. 1939-Aug. 1957, 159 issues) was the first superhero comic book published by Timely Comics, which would eventually become known as Creator/MarvelComics. The first issue is the debut of both the ComicBook/SubMariner (created by Bill Everett) and the Human Torch (created by Carl Burgos).[[note]]Similar in name and powers, but unrelated to the more famous [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Johnny Storm]] from decades later. This early torch would eventually be given the name Jim Hammond[[/note]]

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''Marvel Mystery Comics'' (Oct. 1939-Aug. 1957, 159 issues) was the first superhero comic book published by Timely Comics, which would eventually become known as Creator/MarvelComics. The first issue is the debut of both the ComicBook/SubMariner (created by Bill Everett) and the [[ComicBook/TheHUmanTorch1939 Human Torch Torch]] (created by Carl Burgos).[[note]]Similar in name and powers, but unrelated to the more famous [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Johnny Storm]] from decades later. This early torch would eventually be given the name Jim Hammond[[/note]]

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* GreatWhiteHunter: Ka-Zar once ran across a hunter named Steve Hardy who spent months capturing animals to bring to zoos or collections (but had no qualms about killing them if he had to). Ka-Zar judged him a good man and did not allow the animals to harm him, but he still foiled his attempts to take animals.


* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Given it's one of the oldest comics published by Marvel (as it became known later on, as these comics were actually published by its precursor, Timely Comics), there's plenty to go around:

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Given it's it is one of the oldest comics published by Marvel (as it became known later on, as these comics were actually published by its precursor, Timely Comics), there's there is plenty of weirdmess to go around:



** Instead of a comic centered on one character, it's an anthology of several different stories, some of which aren't superhero related at all. Two of them would sometimes be a cartoon comic strip and a two page prose story.
** For some reason, despite the Human Torch and the Sub Mariner obviously being the headlining stars of the first comic, several early issues tried to shill the more standard issue, vanilla superhero "The Angel" as the series main star, even giving him top billing and appearances on several covers. Once it became clear that Torch and Namor were the series real breadwinners, Angel was [[DemotedToExtra busted back down to a mere recurring character]], and vanished altogether after several more issues.

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** Instead of a comic centered on one character, it's it is an anthology of several different stories, some of which aren't superhero related superhero-related at all. Two of them would sometimes be a cartoon comic strip and a two page prose story.
** For some reason, despite the Human Torch and the Sub Mariner Sub-Mariner obviously being the headlining stars of the first comic, several early issues tried to shill the more standard issue, standard-issue, vanilla superhero "The Angel" as the series series' main star, even giving him top billing and appearances on several covers. Once it became clear that Torch and Namor were the series series' real breadwinners, Angel was [[DemotedToExtra busted back down to a mere recurring character]], and vanished altogether after several more issues.


* CompilationRerelease: The first 28 issues have been reprinted across several volumes as part of Marvels hardcover Masterworks series.

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* CompilationRerelease: The first 28 issues have been reprinted across several volumes as part of Marvels Marvel's hardcover Masterworks series.


* CanonDiscontinuity: The Ka-Zar stories featured in these early comics are considered non-canon to both the later Ka-Zar series, and the Marvel Universe as a whole. The Golden Age Ka-Zar was called "David Rand" and was active in Africa, while the Silver Age (and still appearing) Ka-Zar was called "Kevin Plunder" and was active in the Savage Land, a fictional region of Antarctica. Besides the shared code-name, they have little in common.

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* CanonDiscontinuity: The Ka-Zar stories featured in these early comics are considered non-canon to both the later Ka-Zar series, and the Marvel Universe as a whole. The Golden Age Ka-Zar was called "David Rand" and was active in Africa, while the Silver Age (and still appearing) Ka-Zar was called "Kevin Plunder" and was active in the Savage Land, a fictional region of Antarctica.UsefulNotes/{{Antarctica}}. Besides the shared code-name, they have little in common.


* CanonDiscontinuity: The Ka-Zar stories featured in these early comics are considered non-canon to both the later Ka-Zar series, and the Marvel Universe as a whole.

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* CanonDiscontinuity: The Ka-Zar stories featured in these early comics are considered non-canon to both the later Ka-Zar series, and the Marvel Universe as a whole. The Golden Age Ka-Zar was called "David Rand" and was active in Africa, while the Silver Age (and still appearing) Ka-Zar was called "Kevin Plunder" and was active in the Savage Land, a fictional region of Antarctica. Besides the shared code-name, they have little in common.


* BusCrash: The Human Torch stories had this out of the starting gate. Issue #1 introduced Professor Horton and his creation The Human Torch. At the end of the story The Torch is tired of everyone, including the professor, of using him for their own personal gain. As a result, he escapes Professor Horton's lab by burning a hole through the roof, leaving the professor behind staring in shock at what happened. The Human Torch story in issue #2 starts with recap of the events in the first story with the addition of us being told that Professor Horton was now dead, though apparently he still had the presence of mind to type up his experience while his house burned down around him. Though he would later be revived (briefly) in the 1970s, this would be his only living appearance during the Golden Age Timely/Atlas era.

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* BusCrash: The Human Torch stories had this out of the starting gate. Issue #1 introduced Professor Horton and his creation The Human Torch. At the end of the story The Torch is tired of everyone, including the professor, of using him for their own personal gain. As a result, he escapes Professor Horton's lab by burning a hole through the roof, leaving the professor behind staring in shock at what happened. The Human Torch story in issue #2 starts with recap of the events in the first story with the addition of us being told that Professor Horton was now dead, though apparently he still had the presence of mind to type up his experience while his house burned down around him. Though he would later be revived (briefly) in the 1970s, this would be his only living appearance during the Golden Age Timely/Atlas era.


** The Angel, while being a detective with no superpowers, has a costume that is obviously patterned after ComicBook/{{Superman}}.
** The Ka-Zar of these early comics is a shameless ripoff of Tarzan. His own name is just two letters shy of Tarzan's own name.
** The Masked Raider, an early western comic included in these anthologies, is also an ersatz of TheLoneRanger.

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** The Angel, while being a detective with no superpowers, has a costume that is obviously patterned after ComicBook/{{Superman}}.
Franchise/{{Superman}}.
** The Ka-Zar of these early comics is a shameless ripoff of Tarzan.Franchise/{{Tarzan}}. His own name is just two letters shy of Tarzan's own name.
** The Masked Raider, an early western comic included in these anthologies, is also an ersatz of TheLoneRanger.Radio/TheLoneRanger.

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* CompilationRerelease: The first 28 issues have been reprinted across several volumes as part of Marvels hardcover Masterworks series.


* MilestoneCelebration: On the 70th anniversary of this series, issue #1 was reprinted on it's own as a hardcover 70th anniversary edition.

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* BusCrash: The Human Torch stories had this out of the starting gate. Issue #1 introduced Professor Horton and his creation The Human Torch. At the end of the story The Torch is tired of everyone, including the professor, of using him for their own personal gain. As a result, he escapes Professor Horton's lab by burning a hole through the roof, leaving the professor behind staring in shock at what happened. The Human Torch story in issue #2 starts with recap of the events in the first story with the addition of us being told that Professor Horton was now dead, though apparently he still had the presence of mind to type up his experience while his house burned down around him. Though he would later be revived (briefly) in the 1970s, this would be his only living appearance during the Golden Age Timely/Atlas era.


* CaptainErsatz: The Angel, while being a detective with no superpowers, has a costume that is obviously patterned after ComicBook/{{Superman}}.

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* CaptainErsatz: CaptainErsatz:
**
The Angel, while being a detective with no superpowers, has a costume that is obviously patterned after ComicBook/{{Superman}}.



* TurnedAgainstTheirMasters: In the first issue, The Torch desired to return to the scientist who created him, but turned his back on him and goes it alone once he realizes he just wanted to exploit him like the mobsters he just dealt with.

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* TurnedAgainstTheirMasters: In the first issue, The Torch desired to return to the scientist who created him, but turned his back on him and goes it alone once he realizes he just wanted to exploit him like the mobsters he just dealt with.with.
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