Fridge Harry Potter Discussion

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Darkaros
Topic
03:24:19 PM Jan 20th 2012
Found these Fridge entries from Snape's character page. Did you know that Fridge Brilliance entries that are posted outside of Fridge subpages, especially unsigned, are pretty useless to readd? Just moving these here for reference, maybe someone can move them back to the page when there's time and the page is sorted again. I think there's still some duplicate/unsorted examples from the last time I cleaned up.


  • Fridge Brilliance: Re-read all seven books. What was the first clue that Snape was in love with Lily? When he's insulting Harry, he only compares him to James. (As a matter of fact, Fridge Brilliance was heavily leaned on for his Character Development; the actual trope page has several great examples.)
    • Also, the biggest one: the chapter where Harry looks at Snape's memories is called "Snape's Worst Memory." One would think that it is because he got humiliated by James Potter and Sirius Black, but one could also expect this was somewhat normal for them. Then comes Deathly Hallows and we discover that it is his worst memory because he called Lily Evans "mudblood", ending their friendship and destroying any chance he might have had of ending up with her.
    • Even earlier you have Snape's reaction to Sirius escaping punishment at the hands of the dementors. He damn near flips out and at that point you can only assume it is his hoping for revenge for past years of bullying and perhaps hoping for a bit of recognition. Get to the Prince's Tale and considering the crime that Sirius was thought guilty of at the time and Snape's reaction takes a very different meaning.
    • Fridge Brilliance essentially defines Snape's entire character. Virtually everything he does either makes for more sense or looks entirely different after The Prince's Tale.
    • Snape is never the warmest towards his students, especially the less talented, but his dislike of Neville seems to go beyond that into irrational hatred. Which seems less irrational when you realize that Neville is a constant reminder to Snape that Voldemort chose to pursue the Potters over the Longbottoms, thus tying Lily to her fate.

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