History Fridge / HarryPotter

30th Oct '17 10:30:53 PM TheWildWestPyro
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* This is related to the Fridge Entry about ComingOfAge above, but if we compare Harry's generation to the generation of Dumbledore, Riddle and the Marauders, aren't they really unimpressive? Hermione, the brightest witch of her age, is a {{Bookworm}} who hasn't really created anything as impressive as Snape's Potion improvements or the Marauder's Map. Draco Malfoy, the "Dark Wizard" of his age, is a poor gloss on Snape and Riddle in terms of ability, ambition and talent. Harry himself essentially gets everything handed down to him by genetics (natural talent in Quidditch), patronage (special lessons from Lupin, broomsticks from [=McGonagall=] and Sirius), money from his Parents and Sirius, Invisibility Cloak from his father, and later some spells from Snape's Potions book. The whole magic war has led to the loss of the best minds of that generation, including some in their middle ages like Snape or Lupin, who never really fulfilled their potential. But then consider the fact that Horace Slughorn's Slug Club led to the lack of careerism and inter-house mixage which brought the best minds together, the repeated failures of the D.A.D.A. post and you realize that this decline is a natural consequence and its consistent with the series saying that love and courage are the best magic of all. In a broader scale, the finale is something on the order of TheMagicGoesAway in that wizards and witches, as seen in the Epilogue, are no different from Muggles. And it also ties to the fact that most of the really dangerous and impressive magic comes from the past rather than made in the present or the future. It's also consistent with what happens in the real world, were the best in art, medicine and engineering most often is produced in times of war-heck, part of the reason the Internet was created was so the world could remain connected in the event of the Cold War [[NukeEm going hot]].

to:

* This is related to the Fridge Entry about ComingOfAge above, but if we compare Harry's generation to the generation of Dumbledore, Riddle and the Marauders, aren't they really unimpressive? Hermione, the brightest witch of her age, is a {{Bookworm}} who hasn't really created anything as impressive as Snape's Potion improvements or the Marauder's Map. Draco Malfoy, the "Dark Wizard" of his age, is a poor gloss on Snape and Riddle in terms of ability, ambition and talent. Harry himself essentially gets everything handed down to him by genetics (natural talent in Quidditch), patronage (special lessons from Lupin, broomsticks from [=McGonagall=] and Sirius), money from his Parents and Sirius, Invisibility Cloak from his father, and later some spells from Snape's Potions book. The whole magic war has led to the loss of the best minds of that generation, including some in their middle ages like Snape or Lupin, who never really fulfilled their potential. But then consider the fact that Horace Slughorn's Slug Club led to the lack of careerism and inter-house mixage which brought the best minds together, the repeated failures of the D.A.D.A. post and you realize that this decline is a natural consequence and its consistent with the series saying that love and courage are the best magic of all. In a broader scale, the finale is something on the order of TheMagicGoesAway in that wizards and witches, as seen in the Epilogue, are no different from Muggles. And it also ties to the fact that most of the really dangerous and impressive magic comes from the past rather than made in the present or the future. It's also consistent with what happens in the real world, were the best in art, medicine and engineering most often is produced in times of war-heck, part of the reason the Internet was created was so the world could remain connected in the event of if the Cold War [[NukeEm going went]] [[WorldWarIII hot]].
30th Oct '17 10:30:14 PM TheWildWestPyro
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* This is related to the Fridge Entry about ComingOfAge above, but if we compare Harry's generation to the generation of Dumbledore, Riddle and the Marauders, aren't they really unimpressive? Hermione, the brightest witch of her age, is a {{Bookworm}} who hasn't really created anything as impressive as Snape's Potion improvements or the Marauder's Map. Draco Malfoy, the "Dark Wizard" of his age, is a poor gloss on Snape and Riddle in terms of ability, ambition and talent. Harry himself essentially gets everything handed down to him by genetics (natural talent in Quidditch), patronage (special lessons from Lupin, broomsticks from [=McGonagall=] and Sirius), money from his Parents and Sirius, Invisibility Cloak from his father, and later some spells from Snape's Potions book. The whole magic war has led to the loss of the best minds of that generation, including some in their middle ages like Snape or Lupin, who never really fulfilled their potential. But then consider the fact that Horace Slughorn's Slug Club led to the lack of careerism and inter-house mixage which brought the best minds together, the repeated failures of the D.A.D.A. post and you realize that this decline is a natural consequence and its consistent with the series saying that love and courage are the best magic of all. In a broader scale, the finale is something on the order of TheMagicGoesAway in that wizards and witches, as seen in the Epilogue, are no different from Muggles. And it also ties to the fact that most of the really dangerous and impressive magic comes from the past rather than made in the present or the future. It's also consistent with what happens in the real world, were the best in art and engeneering most often is produced in times of war.

to:

* This is related to the Fridge Entry about ComingOfAge above, but if we compare Harry's generation to the generation of Dumbledore, Riddle and the Marauders, aren't they really unimpressive? Hermione, the brightest witch of her age, is a {{Bookworm}} who hasn't really created anything as impressive as Snape's Potion improvements or the Marauder's Map. Draco Malfoy, the "Dark Wizard" of his age, is a poor gloss on Snape and Riddle in terms of ability, ambition and talent. Harry himself essentially gets everything handed down to him by genetics (natural talent in Quidditch), patronage (special lessons from Lupin, broomsticks from [=McGonagall=] and Sirius), money from his Parents and Sirius, Invisibility Cloak from his father, and later some spells from Snape's Potions book. The whole magic war has led to the loss of the best minds of that generation, including some in their middle ages like Snape or Lupin, who never really fulfilled their potential. But then consider the fact that Horace Slughorn's Slug Club led to the lack of careerism and inter-house mixage which brought the best minds together, the repeated failures of the D.A.D.A. post and you realize that this decline is a natural consequence and its consistent with the series saying that love and courage are the best magic of all. In a broader scale, the finale is something on the order of TheMagicGoesAway in that wizards and witches, as seen in the Epilogue, are no different from Muggles. And it also ties to the fact that most of the really dangerous and impressive magic comes from the past rather than made in the present or the future. It's also consistent with what happens in the real world, were the best in art art, medicine and engeneering engineering most often is produced in times of war.war-heck, part of the reason the Internet was created was so the world could remain connected in the event of the Cold War [[NukeEm going hot]].
30th Oct '17 10:26:51 PM TheWildWestPyro
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Avada Kedavra. The most feared spell in the entire wizarding community isn't the one that gives you complete control of another, or one that fills them with mind-breaking pain. It's an unblockable killing curse. Why? There are many worse curses that kill in much more unpleasant ways (burning, crushing, freezing) but a spell that kills someone so quickly they don't even feel it is punishable with a life sentence. In the Muggle World, while it might be disliked, no country would ever outlaw it. It's too humane a method of killing. But wizards haven't fought the large scale style battles muggles have. Their warfare is mostly one on one or one on a few duels. The fate of an entire country would be decided by one unblockable lucky shot. Obviously that couldn't be allowed. Furthermore, using it is an automatic proof of a premediated murder ("you have to mean it"). Which, as is shown in the books, damages the caster's soul. Other two Unforgivable Curses are also single-use spells with severely adverse effects. Compare with a Stunning spell, which can be lethal but it is not its basic function.

to:

* Avada Kedavra. The most feared spell in the entire wizarding community isn't the one that gives you complete control of another, or one that fills them with mind-breaking pain. It's an unblockable killing curse. Why? There are many worse curses that kill in much more unpleasant ways (burning, crushing, freezing) but a spell that kills someone so quickly they don't even feel it is punishable with a life sentence. In the Muggle World, while it might be disliked, no country would ever outlaw it. It's too humane a method of killing. But wizards haven't fought the large scale style large-scale conventional battles muggles have. smuggles have throughout history. Their warfare 'warfare' is mostly one on one duels or one on a few duels.series of magical hit-and-runs, similar to muggle gang or guerrilla warfare, rather than armed conflicts involving millions of soldiers. The fate of an entire country would be decided by one unblockable lucky shot. Obviously that couldn't be allowed. Furthermore, using it is an automatic proof of a premediated murder ("you have to mean it"). Which, as is shown in the books, damages the caster's soul. Other two Unforgivable Curses are also single-use spells with severely adverse effects. Compare with a Stunning spell, which can be lethal but it is not its basic function.
30th Oct '17 10:22:50 PM TheWildWestPyro
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the movies, the Death Eaters' appearances were modeled after the Nazis and KKK. It made the comparisons to those organizations a little too blatant and Anvilicious. But dressing up like the Nazis and KKK would work to frighten and intimidate muggles and muggle-borns, the Death Eaters' primary victims, who would have knowledge of these groups from muggle history.

to:

* In the movies, the Death Eaters' appearances were modeled after the Nazis and KKK. It made the comparisons to those organizations a little too blatant and Anvilicious. But dressing up like the Nazis and KKK would work to frighten and intimidate muggles and muggle-borns, the Death Eaters' primary victims, who victims. Not only would both victims would have knowledge of these groups from muggle history.history, but both their names and appearance have become practically synonymous with evil over the years.
21st Oct '17 6:29:28 PM TallTroper
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** Even worse, keep in mind that [[spoiler: Harry's a horcrux, that can occasionally influence his behavior. If Harry became an Obscurial, and then the Voldemort soul fragment took advantage of that, who knows what would've happened, but it sure as hell wouldn't have been good...]]
7th Oct '17 4:46:30 PM qazwsx
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Voldemort's attack on the Potters closely resembles his first murder, that of his father and grandparents: he shows up unexpected while the family is home, intent to murder all of them with the Killing Curse. The major difference is that Harry survived and Tom Sr. didn't. Murdering the Riddles was the beginning of his campaign as the Dark Lord, while murdering the Potters was the beginning of his downfall.

to:

* Voldemort's attack on the Potters closely resembles his first murder, that of his father and grandparents: he shows up unexpected while the family is home, intent to murder all of them with the Killing Curse. Uninvolved men (Frank Bryce and Morfin Gaunt in the case of the Riddles, Sirius Black in the case of the Potters) were WrongfullyAccused of having something to do with the murders. The major difference is that Harry survived and Tom Sr. didn't. Murdering the Riddles was the beginning of his campaign as the Dark Lord, with few people knowing about the crime and even fewer knowing who the true killer was; while murdering the Potters was one of his most publicized crimes and marked the beginning of his downfall.
6th Oct '17 8:02:35 PM qazwsx
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Voldemort's attack on the Potters closely resembles his first murder, that of his father and grandparents: he shows up unexpected while the family is home, intent to murder all of them with the Killing Curse. The major difference is that Harry survived and Tom Sr. didn't. Murdering the Riddles was the beginning of his campaign as the Dark Lord, while murdering the Potters was the beginning of his downfall.
24th Aug '17 5:18:37 AM Ghilz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** When everyone comes to pick Harry up in Book 7, and they all take the potion to look like him, I think it's Ron that says something to the effect of "I knew Ginny was lying about that tattoo!", so this happened in canon.



*** He'd be to old. Most Obscurials die by age of 10/11. The kid in Fantastic Beasts was a very rare case. Also, I think the Dursleys were too happy to get Harry out from their house for 10+ months a year (seeing how he ends up spending a month at most there in summer as time goes on, spending it at the Weasley instead) to not spend him. Otherwise he'd be going to the local high school, and living with them all year round. Out of sight, out of mind. But even then, Harry seems unlikely to be the sort of child who would want to hide something that made him special or different. I think he is a bit like Riddle that way, he'd want to cling to it, if only to anger Vernon, as he'd mistreated him his whole life.
24th Aug '17 3:36:52 AM ivymutant
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** He'd be to old. Most Obscurials die by age of 10/11. The kid in Fantastic Beasts was a very rare case. Also, I think the Dursleys were too happy to get Harry out from their house for 10+ months a year (seeing how he ends up spending a month at most there in summer as time goes on, spending it at the Weasley instead) to not spend him. Otherwise he'd be going to the local high school, and living with them all year round. Out of sight, out of mind. But even then, Harry seems unlikely to be the sort of child who would want to hide something that made him special or different. I think he is a bit like Riddle that way, he'd want to cling to it, if only to anger Vernon, as he'd mistreated him his whole life.
23rd Aug '17 11:54:16 PM hyenacub
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

**She does say her parents don't thing magic and teeth should mix. Her parents seem mostly accepting of magic, but were maybe a bit weirded out (or perhaps pride-wounded) thinking about using it for something they've spent years in school to learn to do.
This list shows the last 10 events of 1264. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.HarryPotter