History Fridge / HarryPotter

22nd May '16 5:52:30 PM bjshipley1
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*** Not to mention the fact that Hagrid is one of the people Dumbledore trusts absolutely, Hagrid is someone who can handle himself without resorting to magic (in case the Dursleys proved difficult,) plus it gave Hagrid a chance to use some magic when he normally wasn't allowed.
21st May '16 12:15:56 PM EDP
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** Also, many fans complain that Dumbledore sent a 'janitor' to retrieve Harry, who is revered as a hero by the wizards. Thing is, [[AllmightyJanitor Hagrid's two jobs at the time are rather important]]: as the Groundskeeper he controls access to Hogwarts' grounds, and as the Keeper of the Keys he controls access to the castle. As much as Draco Malfoy dismisses him as a servant, he's effectively the third most important member of Hogwarts' staff.

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** Also, many fans complain that Dumbledore sent a 'janitor' to retrieve Harry, who is revered as a hero by the wizards. Thing is, [[AllmightyJanitor [[AlmightyJanitor Hagrid's two jobs at the time are rather important]]: as the Groundskeeper he controls access to Hogwarts' grounds, and as the Keeper of the Keys he controls access to the castle. As much as Draco Malfoy dismisses him as a servant, he's effectively the third most important member of Hogwarts' staff.
20th May '16 1:13:24 PM Discar
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* How did Fred and George know how to use the Marauder's Map?
** They were most likely magically gifted to figure out what kind of enchantments that had been applied to it, thus figuring out exactly how it works. They possibly were able to recognize its potential when they first laid eyes on it
** Alternatively, the Marauders might have hexed the map so it would reveal itself to people who were as itching to cause trouble as they would. The books state pretty clearly that James and Sirius were as much as troublemakers as Fred and George, and the Marauders would have love it back then for their "legacy" to go on.
** It was passed down through generations of trouble makers. Just like how Fred and George taught Ron and Harry how to use it and then gave it to them.
** But they said they figured it out after nicking it from that file cabinet in Filch's office.
** Filch may have taken it from the users before Fred and George



* Dolores Umbridge: "Dolor" is Latin for pain or grief, which she gives both out in large quantities. "Umbrage" means taking offense, annoyance and displeasure. ''Everyone'' is annoyed and displeased by her tyrannical nature.)
** It's even more than that. She takes umbridge at a great many things, which she uses to justify her painful punishments. She's a parody of "nanny State" politicians, who justify their mean policies with stories about how immoral and deserving of punishment their targets are.

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* Dolores Umbridge: "Dolor" is Latin for pain or grief, which she gives both out in large quantities. "Umbrage" means taking offense, annoyance and displeasure. ''Everyone'' is annoyed and displeased by her tyrannical nature.)
** It's even more than that.
) She takes umbridge at a great many things, which she uses to justify her painful punishments. She's a parody of "nanny State" politicians, who justify their mean policies with stories about how immoral and deserving of punishment their targets are.



* Look at the cover of Philosopher/Sorcerer's Stone. Look at the cover of Deathly Hallows. Stone has a sunset in the background. DH has a sunrise in the background. Symbolically, you'd think it should be the other way around, until you realize every end is a beginning and vice-versa. The end of the Marauders is the beginning of Harry Potter. The end of his story is a new beginning for the wizarding world. Another way to take this bit of symbolism is that the series, metaphorically, is a descent into the dark of night (Voldemort's second reign). Harry going to school in the first book means that the prophecies (etc.) about Voldemort and Harry are going to come true, soon, and so the 'day' that happened after Voldemort's first reign of terror was ending. As others have mentioned, the artwork gets progressively darker, until things are "darkest before the dawn", like in the sixth book when Death Eaters have killed Dumbledore and are actively taking over the Ministry. Finally, in DH, the long night of Voldemort is over, and so the cover shows the dawning of a new, Voldemort-free day.
** The covers were all done by the same artist, Mary [=GrandPré=]. She uses a more mature style as the series progresses and the story lines become more mature.

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* Look at the cover of Philosopher/Sorcerer's Stone. Look at the cover of Deathly Hallows. Stone has a sunset in the background. DH has a sunrise in the background. Symbolically, you'd think it should be the other way around, until you realize every end is a beginning and vice-versa. The end of the Marauders is the beginning of Harry Potter. The end of his story is a new beginning for the wizarding world. Another way to take this bit of symbolism is that the series, metaphorically, is a descent into the dark of night (Voldemort's second reign). Harry going to school in the first book means that the prophecies (etc.) about Voldemort and Harry are going to come true, soon, and so the 'day' that happened after Voldemort's first reign of terror was ending. As others have mentioned, the artwork gets progressively darker, until things are "darkest before the dawn", like in the sixth book when Death Eaters have killed Dumbledore and are actively taking over the Ministry. Finally, in DH, the long night of Voldemort is over, and so the cover shows the dawning of a new, Voldemort-free day. \n** The covers were all done by the same artist, Mary [=GrandPré=]. She uses a more mature style as the series progresses and the story lines become more mature.



* At first it seem that Voldemort's line "Stand aside, you foolish girl" and offering to spare Lily's life was unimportant. Then ''Deathly Hallows'' rolls around, and [[spoiler:Snape admits he begged Voldemort for Lily's life. Because of this, he offered to spare Lily if she let him kill Harry, and ''she'' offered herself in place. When he killed her he essentially accepted the bargain, and then went back on it, ''which was why the spell backfired.'' Because Snape asked for Lily to live, Harry is the Chosen One! It could never have been anyone else.]] ''That'' is brilliant.

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* "Stand aside:"
**
At first it seem that Voldemort's line "Stand aside, you foolish girl" and offering to spare Lily's life was unimportant. Then ''Deathly Hallows'' rolls around, and [[spoiler:Snape admits he begged Voldemort for Lily's life. Because of this, he offered to spare Lily if she let him kill Harry, and ''she'' offered herself in place. When he killed her he essentially accepted the bargain, and then went back on it, ''which was why the spell backfired.'' Because Snape asked for Lily to live, Harry is the Chosen One! It could never have been anyone else.]] ''That'' is brilliant.



** Which doesn't help save Snape's life. Among 7 DADA teacher, only Lockhart and Umbridge survive, because they technicallly DIDN'T TEACH ANYTHING. From the ring's curse, we all know how strong Voldemort's curse can be. Snape and Remus temperatory survive because they both retire before the curse effect kick-in.



* How did James and Lily wind up together, when James was a JerkJock and Lily was a loyal friend who would fiercely stand up for what is right? Well... they're not that different. They're both very loyal to their friends, even when those friends betray them, they're both very intelligent, quite popular (though, as a muggle-born, Lily still may have felt like an outcast like Snape did), magically talented, and pretty brave. They're very much two sides of the same coin; Lily uses her personality for good, and James abuses it and becomes a JerkJock. But then James undergoes Character Development, and it's only then that Lily begins to think of him than something other than an 'arrogant toerag.' The central theme to the books is that choices make people who they are, not inborn traits-- Lily and James both made choices that made them the people who they were, and James's choices led to Lily finally falling for him!
** Also Lily's reaction to Snape comes from a bad first impression between James and Sirius and Snape. Initially she dismissed James out of loyalty to Snape, her childhood friend who was getting a hard time, so she generally censored all of James' good qualities. Once Snape was out of the picture, it probably became easier for her to appreciate James without having to qualify any criticism of Slytherins with "James Potter is a toerag" comments. It was likely that she was always attracted to James but held back because of his personality and his treatment of Snape.
** It's likely that she and Snape were never as close as Snape made it out to be. She always had problems with Snape being possessive, attacking Petunia because she "doesn't matter" and so on. Before Snape was the one who knew about magic and told Lily that she was special so perhaps she felt she depended on him since he knew more about magic than she did. But then at Hogwarts it was Lily who was coming to Snape's defense from her friends and against James, becoming a star pupil and growing in self-confidence and forthrightness. Their friendship mainly had commonality connection, them being the only magical people in the neighbourhood and living in the same area, once those barriers faded away there was not a lot in common between them and the rise of Voldemort merely brought that out.



* Harry´s explosive temper seems a bit odd, being him (generally) a calm and quiet boy. But then you remember he´s lived with [[HairTriggerTemper Vernon]] his complete life and it´s a lot more sense. First, he´s been repressed to express any feeling and second, that is the only way he knows to canalize his anger.
** Harry has been trained to bottle things up, so he has a long fuse and tends to internalize things even when he's angry. For example, he never actually tells Hermione that he's angry about the Firebolt, he just lets Ron engage with her. But when Harry explodes, he explodes.



* Hagrid is the one who brought Harry to the Dursleys, later reintroduced him to the Wizarding World, and then brought him away from Privet Drive for the last (on-screen) time. Hagrid is Hogwarts' ''Keeper of Keys''. Who better than him to lock Harry out for his own protection, later reopen his door to the Wizarding World, and finally bring Harry out of Privet Drive for good?

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* Hagrid fetching Harry:
**
Hagrid is the one who brought Harry to the Dursleys, later reintroduced him to the Wizarding World, and then brought him away from Privet Drive for the last (on-screen) time. Hagrid is Hogwarts' ''Keeper of Keys''. Who better than him to lock Harry out for his own protection, later reopen his door to the Wizarding World, and finally bring Harry out of Privet Drive for good?



* Knowing what we do about Horcruxes, imagine if you're a skilled witch or wizard who happens upon an object and because of your skill and knowledge you're able to recognize that it is a Horcrux (as Harry thought the guy at Borgin and Burkes might have been able to). You now know the following things:
** Somebody made it.
** The person who made it is a remorseless murderer.
** The person who made it is still alive and out there somewhere.
** A piece of that person is in it!
** That person might not be too happy that you found their Horcrux and identified it.
* Hogwarts has been around since the Middle Ages, when practicing sorcery was very much a punishable crime in Western Europe, and secular authorities could--and very often ''did''--have people arrested and executed on charges of practicing witchcraft. While the heyday of witch hunts may not have come until after the Protestant Reformation in the 1500's, it's easy to imagine how disastrous the consequences might have been if one of the Kings of England had discovered ''an active training ground for Witches and Warlocks within the borders of his kingdom''. The populace of Hogwarts is pretty damn lucky TheMasquerade has held up as long as it has.
** Not quite -- Sir Nicholas was a ''known'' wizard in the 1480s and was only executed in 1492 after a spell went wrong -- he gave a woman tusks when she asked him to fix her teeth. He was even ''knighted'' by Henry VII between 1485 and 1492, so at least one King of England knew of witches and wizards. And, if the WOMBAT answer is to be believed, then Anne Boleyn was a squib, meaning that the Howards, ''descended from Edward I'', had magic in them... which could have come from the Kings of England anyway. Not to mention that there is a picture of Mary I at Hogwarts with a wand, meaning that Henry VIII produced a witch child; Mary's mother, Catherine of Aragon, was descended from John of Gaunt... who was ''also'' a descendant of Edward I, meaning magic probably runs in the Royal Family.
20th May '16 12:40:52 PM EDP
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* In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheSorcerersStone'', the chambers guarding the Sorcerer's Stone all align with the values of the four Houses of Hogwarts. Rubeus Hagrid (a Gryffindor) guards the Stone with a vicious three-headed dog, requiring seekers of the Stone to have the courage to face it; Pomona Sprout (a Hufflepuff) guards the Stone with a Devil's Snare plant, which can only be overcome by resisting the urge to fight and remaining immobile; Filius Flitwick (a Ravenclaw) guards the Stone with a charmed door, which can only be unlocked if one has the clarity of mind to select the correct key out of a multitude of them; Severus Snape (a Slytherin) guards the Stone with a simple logical puzzle, requiring simple cunning rather than specialized magical skills; Minerva [=McGonagall=] (a "hat stall" between Gryffindor and Ravenclaw) forces seekers to play a charmed chess game, which requires the courage to risk death on the chessboard and the strategic intelligence to negotiate a path to the finish line. But even if one overcomes all of those obstacles, there's still the Mirror of Erised, put in place by Albus Dumbledore. The Mirror of Erised only surrenders the Stone to people seeking it for the right reasons, regardless of whether they displayed the magical aptitude to overcome the previous challenges--reflecting Dumbledore's belief that "It is our choices, far more than our abilities, that show who we truly are."

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* In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheSorcerersStone'', ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'', the chambers guarding the Sorcerer's Philosopher's Stone all align with the values of the four Houses of Hogwarts. Rubeus Hagrid (a Gryffindor) guards the Stone with a vicious three-headed dog, requiring seekers of the Stone to have the courage to face it; Pomona Sprout (a Hufflepuff) guards the Stone with a Devil's Snare plant, which can only be overcome by resisting the urge to fight and remaining immobile; Filius Flitwick (a Ravenclaw) guards the Stone with a charmed door, which can only be unlocked if one has the clarity of mind to select the correct key out of a multitude of them; Severus Snape (a Slytherin) guards the Stone with a simple logical puzzle, requiring simple cunning rather than specialized magical skills; Minerva [=McGonagall=] (a "hat stall" between Gryffindor and Ravenclaw) forces seekers to play a charmed chess game, which requires the courage to risk death on the chessboard and the strategic intelligence to negotiate a path to the finish line. But even if one overcomes all of those obstacles, there's still the Mirror of Erised, put in place by Albus Dumbledore. The Mirror of Erised only surrenders the Stone to people seeking it for the right reasons, regardless of whether they displayed the magical aptitude to overcome the previous challenges--reflecting Dumbledore's belief that "It is our choices, far more than our abilities, that show who we truly are.""
* Hagrid is the one who brought Harry to the Dursleys, later reintroduced him to the Wizarding World, and then brought him away from Privet Drive for the last (on-screen) time. Hagrid is Hogwarts' ''Keeper of Keys''. Who better than him to lock Harry out for his own protection, later reopen his door to the Wizarding World, and finally bring Harry out of Privet Drive for good?
** Also, many fans complain that Dumbledore sent a 'janitor' to retrieve Harry, who is revered as a hero by the wizards. Thing is, [[AllmightyJanitor Hagrid's two jobs at the time are rather important]]: as the Groundskeeper he controls access to Hogwarts' grounds, and as the Keeper of the Keys he controls access to the castle. As much as Draco Malfoy dismisses him as a servant, he's effectively the third most important member of Hogwarts' staff.
30th Apr '16 5:47:45 PM TheMightyHeptagon
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* In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheSorcerersStone'', the chambers guarding the Sorcerer's Stone all align with the values of the four Houses of Hogwarts. Rubeus Hagrid (a Gryffindor) guards the Stone with a vicious three-headed dog, requiring seekers of the Stone to have the courage to face it; Pomona Sprout (a Hufflepuff) guards the Stone with a Devil's Snare plant, which can only be overcome by resisting the urge to fight and remaining immobile; Filius Flitwick (a Ravenclaw) guards the Stone with a charmed door, which can only be unlocked if one has the clarity of mind to select the correct key out of a multitude of them; Severus Snape (a Slytherin) guards the Stone with a simple logical puzzle, requiring simple cunning rather than specialized magical skills; Minerva [=McGonagall=] (a "hat stall" between Gryffindor and Ravenclaw) forces seekers to play a charmed chess game, which requires the courage to risk death on the chessboard and the strategic intelligence to negotiate a path to the finish line. But even if one overcomes all of those obstacles, there's still the Mirror of Erised, put in place by Albus Dumbledore. The Mirror of Erised only surrenders the Stone to people seeking it for the right reasons, regardless of whether they displayed the magical aptitude to overcome the previous challenges--reflecting Dumbledore's belief that "It is our choices, far more than our abilities, that show who we truly are."
6th Apr '16 5:17:21 PM JamesSwann
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** Not quite -- Sir Nicholas was a ''known'' wizard in the 1480s and was only executed in 1492 after a spell went wrong -- he gave a woman tusks when she asked him to fix her teeth. He was even ''knighted'' by Henry VII between 1485 and 1492, so at least one King of England knew of witches and wizards. And, if the WOMBAT answer is to be believed, then Anne Boleyn was a squib, meaning that the Howards, ''descended from Edward I'', had magic in them... which could have come from the Kings of England anyway. Not to mention that there is a picture of Mary I at Hogwarts with a wand, meaning that Henry VIII produced a witch child; Mary's mother, Catherine of Aragon, was descended from John of Gaunt... who was ''also'' a descendant of Edward I, meaning magic probably runs in the Royal Family.


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* J.K. Rowling writes about powerful women... yet it's ''because'' of two women that everything from 1000 to 1998 that is related to Voldemort (directly or indirectly!) and Salazar Slytherin happens. If the woman (or women, if a two half grandchildren of Salazar Slytherin started the inbreeding!) who slept with Salazar Slytherin had ''not'' slept with him, then the Gaunt Family wouldn't exist and he wouldn't have heirs... and if Merope had not slept (read: raped) Voldemort's father, then he wouldn't have been born and everything wouldn't have happened. Loads and loads of dead people would be alive, tortured families wouldn't be tortured, families wouldn't have lost people to him. For all the powerful women J.K. Rowling rights about... it's ''because'' of women that the Wizarding world is tortured for years by Voldemort and because of these women that he ''even exists in the first place''.
2nd Apr '16 2:58:34 PM temujinIX
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** It's even more than that. She takes umbridge at a great many things, which she uses to justify her painful punishments. She's a parody of "nanny State" politicians, who justify their mean policies with stories about how immoral and deserving of punishment their targets are.
31st Mar '16 4:46:56 PM Tropershaped
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* The unspoken consequence of Harry being a Horcrux: As long as he was orphaned in the same way, it wouldn't matter WHO took Harry in. Prolonged exposure would guarantee his caregivers would be abusive in some way.
3rd Mar '16 4:05:47 AM TICKTACKTOCK
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**Filch may have taken it from the users before Fred and George
27th Feb '16 8:53:48 AM Discar
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* So when Voldemort went to kill baby Harry, he intended for that death to [[spoiler:become his 6th horcrux -- splitting his soul 7 ways. We don't actually know which item he intended to turn into a horcrux, though. We DO know he wanted to use items that belonged to the founders, and the Potters lived at Godric's Hollow.]]
** [[spoiler: It would have been Nagini. Voldemort tended to get the item first and then perform the Horcrux spell. The only known relic of Gryffindor's was his sword, which was safely in the headmaster's office at Hogwarts. Since he couldn't get that last founder's item, he decided to make do with his snake]].
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