History Fridge / HarryPotter

2nd Feb '16 6:15:03 PM Discar
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* Cruciatus is the root for the word "Excruciating" -- an appropriate adjective for the curse's effects. ** It is also taken from the latin word for "to Crucify"
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* Cruciatus is the root for the word "Excruciating" -- an appropriate adjective for the curse's effects. ** effects. It is also taken from the latin word for "to Crucify"Crucify."

** [[spoiler:Also after finding out that sirius was the one who suggested Wormtail for secret keeper, probably amped up Snapes hatred for Sirius, basically it was still Sirius' fault Lily died]]
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** [[spoiler:Also after finding [[spoiler:Finding out that sirius Sirius was the one who suggested Wormtail for secret keeper, keeper probably amped up Snapes Snape's hatred for Sirius, because it was basically it was still Sirius' fault Lily died]]died]].
2nd Feb '16 3:07:22 AM finalfaw
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**[[spoiler:Also after finding out that sirius was the one who suggested Wormtail for secret keeper, probably amped up Snapes hatred for Sirius, basically it was still Sirius' fault Lily died]]
2nd Feb '16 2:55:34 AM finalfaw
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** It is also taken from the latin word for "to Crucify"
5th Jan '16 8:09:26 PM Discar
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Example Indentation and natter.
** Those are also far from being the only times we see how brave Neville actually is, books five showed him to be one of the most passionate members of Dumbledore's Army, plus he was ready to face the curse that destroyed his parents' brains (cast by the same person who did it to his parents, no less). Even in the first book, before facing the trio in the end, Neville proved his bravery (althought after a little encouragement) by facing Goyle in a ''fistfight''.

* A ''lot'' of people have mocked Dumbledore's idea that "the power he knows not" was love, but think about it this way. How does Harry defeat his challenges? In every year, Harry needs the help of his friends to survive and win. What does Harry have that Voldemort never could? He has allies, comrades, ''friends''. ThePowerOfLove is not, in the end, some kind of mystical spell, but the simple ability to make friends who can aid Harry in his quests. ** Also, it's been noticed that ThePowerOfLove in Harry is the ability to gather friends and allies, while Tom's FatalFlaw was to be unable to understand others, and both of them are instrumental in his downfall. The latter causes him not to understand why Snape actually wanted Lily to live, and that's what lead to Snape's HeelFaceTurn, and he only has subordinates, not friends nor allies, most of them following him out of fear or ambition, instead of true loyalty (and that's why, without him, his reign doesn't even last one day), and he's unable to understand their motivations. There's exactly one among them who actually loves him, Bellatrix, and she was the one to see that Snape was faking his loyalty, had Tom listened to her, Dumbledore's plan would have been stopped. Also, by the end of the fifth book Snape most likely told Dumbledore about Bellatrix's doubts, but we wouldn't have found out untile the next one, hence that choice of words becomes a subtle TakeThat from [[MagnificentBastard Dumbledore]] and a really subtle bit of {{Foreshadowing}} from JK herself.
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* A ''lot'' of people have mocked Dumbledore's idea that "the power he knows not" was love, but think about it this way. How does Harry defeat his challenges? In every year, Harry needs the help of his friends to survive and win. What does Harry have that Voldemort never could? He has allies, comrades, ''friends''. ThePowerOfLove is not, in the end, some kind of mystical spell, but the simple ability to make friends who can aid Harry in his quests. ** quests. Also, it's been noticed that ThePowerOfLove in Harry is the ability to gather friends and allies, while Tom's FatalFlaw was to be unable to understand others, and both of them are instrumental in his downfall. The latter causes him not to understand why Snape actually wanted Lily to live, and that's what lead to Snape's HeelFaceTurn, and he only has subordinates, not friends nor allies, most of them following him out of fear or ambition, instead of true loyalty (and that's why, without him, his reign doesn't even last one day), and he's unable to understand their motivations. There's exactly one among them who actually loves him, Bellatrix, and she was the one to see that Snape was faking his loyalty, had Tom listened to her, Dumbledore's plan would have been stopped. Also, by the end of the fifth book Snape most likely told Dumbledore about Bellatrix's doubts, but we wouldn't have found out untile the next one, hence that choice of words becomes a subtle TakeThat from [[MagnificentBastard Dumbledore]] and a really subtle bit of {{Foreshadowing}} from JK herself.
5th Jan '16 5:53:48 AM Mantyf
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* This is related to the Fridge Entry about ComingOfAge above, but if we compare Harry's generation to the generation of Dumbledore, Riddle and the Marauders, aren't they really unimpressive? Hermione, the brightest witch of her age, is a {{Bookworm}} who hasn't really created anything as impressive as Snape's Potion improvements or the Marauder's Map. Draco Malfoy, the "Dark Wizard" of his age, is a poor gloss on Snape and Riddle in terms of ability, ambition and talent. Harry himself essentially gets everything handed down to him by genetics (natural talent in Quidditch), patronage (special lessons from Lupin, broomsticks from [=McGonagall=] and Sirius), money from his Parents and Sirius, Invisibility Cloak from his father, and later some spells from Snape's Potions book. The whole magic war has led to the loss of the best minds of that generation, including some in their middle ages like Snape or Lupin, who never really fulfilled their potential. But then consider the fact that Horace Slughorn's Slug Club led to the lack of careerism and inter-house mixage which brought the best minds together, the repeated failures of the D.A.D.A. post and you realize that this decline is a natural consequence and its consistent with the series saying that love and courage are the best magic of all. In a broader scale, the finale is something on the order of TheMagicGoesAway in that wizards and witches, as seen in the Epilogue, are no different from Muggles. And it also ties to the fact that most of the really dangerous and impressive magic comes from the past rather than made in the present or the future.
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* This is related to the Fridge Entry about ComingOfAge above, but if we compare Harry's generation to the generation of Dumbledore, Riddle and the Marauders, aren't they really unimpressive? Hermione, the brightest witch of her age, is a {{Bookworm}} who hasn't really created anything as impressive as Snape's Potion improvements or the Marauder's Map. Draco Malfoy, the "Dark Wizard" of his age, is a poor gloss on Snape and Riddle in terms of ability, ambition and talent. Harry himself essentially gets everything handed down to him by genetics (natural talent in Quidditch), patronage (special lessons from Lupin, broomsticks from [=McGonagall=] and Sirius), money from his Parents and Sirius, Invisibility Cloak from his father, and later some spells from Snape's Potions book. The whole magic war has led to the loss of the best minds of that generation, including some in their middle ages like Snape or Lupin, who never really fulfilled their potential. But then consider the fact that Horace Slughorn's Slug Club led to the lack of careerism and inter-house mixage which brought the best minds together, the repeated failures of the D.A.D.A. post and you realize that this decline is a natural consequence and its consistent with the series saying that love and courage are the best magic of all. In a broader scale, the finale is something on the order of TheMagicGoesAway in that wizards and witches, as seen in the Epilogue, are no different from Muggles. And it also ties to the fact that most of the really dangerous and impressive magic comes from the past rather than made in the present or the future. It's also consistent with what happens in the real world, were the best in art and engeneering most often is produced in times of war. * On a related note, Harry comes out as unimpressive, compared to Dumbledore and Tom, because he mostly has things handled to him (either by nature or influential mentors), while the former two both developed significant innovations. However, in the end, what turns out to be mastery over Deah? ''Acceptance''. Harry might have less qualities on his own, but that also means he never actually see himself above the others, while the others' couldn't do that because of their egoes, an issue that was adressed both in the three brothers' tale and in Harry and Dumbledore's final confrontation.
5th Jan '16 5:41:33 AM Mantyf
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** Also, it's been noticed that ThePowerOfLove in Harry is the ability to gather friends and allies, while Tom's FatalFlaw was to be unable to understand others, and both of them are instrumental in his downfall. The latter causes him not to understand why Snape actually wanted Lily to live, and that's what lead to Snape's HeelFaceTurn, and he only has subordinates, not friends nor allies, most of them following him out of fear or ambition, instead of true loyalty (and that's why, without him, his reign doesn't even last one day), and he's unable to understand their motivations. There's exactly one among them who actually loves him, Bellatrix, and she was the one to see that Snape was faking his loyalty, had Tom listened to her, Dumbledore's plan would have been stopped. Also, by the end of the fifth book Snape most likely told Dumbledore about Bellatrix's doubts, but we wouldn't have found out untile the next one, hence that choice of words becomes a subtle TakeThat from [[MagnificentBastard Dumbledore]] and a really subtle bit of {{Foreshadowing}} from JK herself.
5th Jan '16 3:53:15 AM Mantyf
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** Those are also far from being the only times we see how brave Neville actually is, books five showed him to be one of the most passionate members of Dumbledore's Army, plus he was ready to face the curse that destroyed his parents' brains (cast by the same person who did it to his parents, no less). Even in the first book, before facing the trio in the end, Neville proved his bravery (althought after a little encouragement) by facing Goyle in a ''fistfight''.
3rd Jan '16 8:42:32 PM xXwindsofchangeXx
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[[/folder]]
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* Sirius's seething dislike for Snape in adulthood seems strange on a couple of levels, especially given that he's known for years that it was not Snape who ultimately betrayed James and Lily, but Peter Pettigrew. Most of whatever he did toward Snape when they were students together was because he was following James's lead. However, consider this: while Sirius was sorted into Gryffindor, his brother, Regulus, was sorted into Slytherin a couple of years later, by which time Snape had likely befriended the future Death Eaters. So Snape was likely part of the group of future Death Eater students that convinced Regulus (at this point an impressionable kid already indoctrinated by the beliefs of his family) to join up. Regulus, though, ultimately had too much good in him to stay the course, and turned against Voldemort, which eventually cost him his life. It's very possible - especially for a guy that spent most of his adult life in Azkaban up to that point - that Sirius held Snape at least partially responsible for his brother actually joining the Death Eaters and eventually dying. (Sirius probably assumes Voldemort killed Regulus for some sort of failure, as Kreacher was the only one who knew how Regulus actually died.) * Snape going from his talk with Lily of how blood purity doesn't matter, to Death Eater sympathizer as a student, isn't far of a stretch for one reason - his dad. Tobias Snape was [[{{Jerkass}} a bit]] [[AbusiveParents of a jerk]] and abused Eileen and probably, to some degree, Severus himself. It's implied he bullied Eileen into submission and unwillingness - possibly even an inability - to use her magic to protect herself and her son. Snape led a lonely childhood, and the other Muggle he likely knew around his own age was Petunia Evans. Of course he'd come to Hogwarts thinking less of Muggles when the only two he knew coming up were thoroughly unpleasant people.[[/folder]]
25th Dec '15 2:34:14 AM Freshmeat
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* Mad Eye turning Malfoy into a ferret seems funny at first. But Malfoy's a daddy's boy, and Moody is actually Barty Crouch Jr, who hates the Death Eaters who abandoned Voldemort, Lucius being one of them. When Draco mentions his father, "Moody" gets even angrier, because Lucius has made so much money out of not being loyal to Voldemort. Barty Crouch, Jr. was ''jealous'' of Draco.

** People's predictions aren't as far-fetched as they seem. [[spoiler:At every opportunity starting with Harry's first divination class in ''Prisoner of Azkaban'', Trelawny has insisted that Harry will die a premature death (with one exception in ''Order of the Phoenix''). Guess what? ''[[{{Foreshadowing}} He does.]]'' She also references the Grim, which is supposed to herald death, and he even sees it a few times, but it turns out to be Sirius -- whom Harry sees before he dies. Also, in ''Half Blood Prince'', Dumbledore says that Slughorn has a knack for predicting who will go on to become famous. Slughorn then invites Ginny to his elite club after witnessing her Bat-Bogey hex. Fast forward to the epilogue, Ginny's become [[WordOfGod the senior Quidditch correspondent for the Daily Prophet after a successful career with the Holyhead Harpies team]] and is the wife of the most famous wizard of all time: Harry Potter. Not only that, but Harry and Ron's predictions for each other also come true: Ron predicts Harry will have a 'windfall of unexpected gold' and the next year Harry wins a thousand Galleons in the Triwizard Cup. Harry predicts that Ron will face 'trials and suffering' but also have 'great happiness.' Ron suffers as much as anyone in the series (apart from Harry himself perhaps), but in the end lives happily ever after with his [[NerdsAreSexy hot nerd love, Hermione]].]] Dynamic Dragon
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** People's predictions aren't as far-fetched as they seem. [[spoiler:At every opportunity starting with Harry's first divination class in ''Prisoner of Azkaban'', Trelawny has insisted that Harry will die a premature death (with one exception in ''Order of the Phoenix''). Guess what? ''[[{{Foreshadowing}} He does.]]'' She also references the Grim, which is supposed to herald death, and he even sees it a few times, but it turns out to be Sirius -- whom Harry sees before he dies. Also, in ''Half Blood Prince'', Dumbledore says that Slughorn has a knack for predicting who will go on to become famous. Slughorn then invites Ginny to his elite club after witnessing her Bat-Bogey hex. Fast forward to the epilogue, Ginny's become [[WordOfGod the senior Quidditch correspondent for the Daily Prophet after a successful career with the Holyhead Harpies team]] and is the wife of the most famous wizard of all time: Harry Potter. Not only that, but Harry and Ron's predictions for each other also come true: Ron predicts Harry will have a 'windfall of unexpected gold' and the next year Harry wins a thousand Galleons in the Triwizard Cup. Harry predicts that Ron will face 'trials and suffering' but also have 'great happiness.' Ron suffers as much as anyone in the series (apart from Harry himself perhaps), but in the end lives happily ever after with his [[NerdsAreSexy hot nerd love, Hermione]].]] Dynamic Dragon]]

* Given that both are muggle-borns and teen geniuses, Snape's nasty treatment of Hermione might not be just because he's a jerkass, but also because she reminds him of Lily, and he's probably angered by her friendship with Harry (who of course reminds him of James Potter). ** However, Hermione is shown to be a different person in looks and personality, the only thing they have in common is the fact that they're both Gryffindor girls at the top of their year.

* There was more to Harry's angst in ''Order of the Phoenix'' than just being a broody teenager. In ''Deathly Hallows'', while taking turns wearing the locket Horcrux, whoever is wearing it feels miserable, and their situation seems even worse than it is (and it's pretty bad to begin with). Near the end of ''Deathly Hallows'', we learn that [[spoiler: part of Voldemort's soul is attached to Harry's soul. So imagine having the locket Horcrux inside you at all times with no way to remove it. And this was coupled with the fact that Voldemort had come back to full power, which strengthened the connection between his soul and the piece of it in Harry. So it wasn't just Harry wangsting and whining, it was being so close to Voldemort that it made everything seem worse to him.]] This also opens up more Fridge Brilliance about why Harry was more upset over Cedric's death than Sirius's. Because of Harry's connection with Voldemort, it made Cedric's death more tragic to him than to anyone else, except probably Cho. Harry was very upset after Sirius died at the end of Order of the Phoenix, but didn't seem to be afterwards. Voldemort started using Occlumency against Harry sometime between the fifth and sixth books. When Harry took off the locket in Deathly Hallows, he immediately felt much less miserable. After being directly connected [[spoiler: to Voldemort's soul]] for an entire year, having Voldemort blocking himself from it was enough of a relief that he was able to get over Sirius's death faster than he could have with Cedric's.

* Ron mentioned in ''Deathly Hallows'' that Voldemort had made his own name taboo--that is, if anyone said it, it would automatically dispatch the Snatchers, who would then rough them up (or, if it turned out to be Harry, turn his ass in). He not only finds a way to separate Harry from everyone else (because he knows Harry's one of the few who has the balls to say the name), he also mocks Harry's (and by extension Dumbledore's) bravery. He wants to keep the wizarding world in a constant state of fear, and creating such an intense fear of his name alone is, in my opinion, sheer, terrifying genius. We're often told that Voldemort is super intelligent and super evil, but details like this really show it.

* Why is Harry the one who has to look for the Horcruxes (and Hallows)? Because he's ''a great seeker''. It could have been indirectly foreshadowed as far back as when he first attempted to ''catch'' his letters from Hogwarts. Although that's a stretch.
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* Why is Harry the one who has to look for the Horcruxes (and Hallows)? Because he's ''a great seeker''. It could have been indirectly foreshadowed as far back as when he first attempted to ''catch'' his letters from Hogwarts. Although that's a stretch.

* You know how "Avada Kedavra" sounds a lot like "Abra Kedabra"? The obvious implication is that someone heard the phrase, didn't know it's implications but knew it sounded/meant something awesome, and it got passed onto fake magicians as a catch phrase. The horror comes from the fact that it's now a common catch phrase and analogous to the sound of a magic gun going off. In book 7, dark wizards could accidentally return fire on muggle kids who scream it too loudly. Inquisitors are bound to shackle up street performers who use it in gambling alleyways (remember that inquisitors live long and leave their atticks clean of pop-culture, Holmes style). AND NOW HAPPY-GO-LUCKY TRICK MAGICIANS AROUND THE WORLD ARE CONSTANTLY SAYING "PLEASE #$%^ THIS SAWED WOMAN TO DEATH".

** Not to mention that the prejudice against Muggle-Borns goes back ''centuries'' before the start of the series, all the way back to Salazar Slytherin and his kinsmen (and probably before even him). As uplifting as the ending may be, centuries-old prejudices definitely '''don't''' vanish overnight. In a way, it's almost scarier to think that Voldemort was just the spark that set off years of anti-Muggle sentiment. One Dark Wizard can be defeated in a duel, but centuries of deeply ingrained racial hatred are a bit more complicated. Rowling even seems to subtly acknowledge this at the end of the series. With the famous last two lines ([[spoiler: "The scar had not pained him for nineteen years. All was well."]]), said as Harry touches his scar, one gets the impression that he's futilely trying to reassure himself that history won't repeat itself. * Certain pure-blood families would rather have members marry their own cousins than Muggle-borns or half-bloods. Now we know why Crabbe and Goyle are so [[DumbMuscle dumb.]]
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** Not to mention that the prejudice against Muggle-Borns goes back ''centuries'' before the start of the series, all the way back to Salazar Slytherin and his kinsmen (and probably before even him). As uplifting as the ending may be, centuries-old prejudices definitely '''don't''' vanish overnight. In a way, it's almost scarier to think that Voldemort was just the spark that set off years of anti-Muggle sentiment. One Dark Wizard can be defeated in a duel, but centuries of deeply ingrained racial hatred are a bit more complicated. Rowling even seems to subtly acknowledge this at the end of the series. With the famous last two lines ([[spoiler: "The scar had not pained him for nineteen years. All was well."]]), said as Harry touches his scar, one gets the impression that he's futilely trying to reassure himself that history won't repeat itself.\n* Certain pure-blood families would rather have members marry their own cousins than Muggle-borns or half-bloods. Now we know why Crabbe and Goyle are so [[DumbMuscle dumb.]]

* The whole Wizarding world (or at least British Wizarding), depending on one's interpretation of what we see. This society is presented as class- and caste-ridden; stagnant and insular. Voldemort was able to rise to political and magical dominance twice over the course of a few decades - which is like Hitler turning out to be alive in the early sixties and enacting the same political rise and war that he did the first time round. Voldemort is supported by the same people for the same reasons. The Wizarding world, apparently, completely failed to change to address the problems that allowed for Voldemort's success the first time round (which is to say its caste systems, its elitism, its insularity, its conservatism). These problems are acknowledged in the series and recognised by the characters; the Fridge Horror comes in when we read the 'happy ending' and see that once again, this society has withstood massive turmoil and tragedy unaltered. The same problems are still firmly in place, cosy conservatism winning out over the progressive or challenging points made earlier in the series. The Hogwarts Houses are still creating fear and division amongst young people, Wizard society is still secret and separate from Muggle society for reasons that seem to be more about fear and elitism than logic, there's no sign of non-human magical races being any more involved or respected in Wizard life. Wizard society is cursed with rigidity and stagnation, and doomed to repeat its mistakes indefinitely. However, with people like Hermione (who is not only stubborn, but amazing at magic and famous in her own right) who firmly believes in creating equality and has connections at Hogwarts (Neville) and Harry Potter himself, there is at least a glimmer of hope that things might begin to change.

* Corruption: ** This is a good FridgeHorror related to FridgeBrilliance... it's never outright stated but pretty much explained in book 7 that being close to a Horcrux long enough appears to cause some bit of corruption subconsciously. In book 2, Ginny gets brainwashed by the diary that was revealed as a horcrux later on. In book 7 we see the necklace start to gradually corrupt Hermione and Ron (And having pushed Umbridge further past the MoralEventHorizon if she wasn't there already,) So what does this mean? Note that ''HARRY'' is a Horcrux... and who did he spend the most time with? The Dursley's. Yep - it's possible that their anger and resentment of him could have been ''amplified'' due to being close to a Horcrux for pretty much ten-eleven years straight. Which means that Dudley could have been an actual ''nice'' kid... who gets screwed up. ** As a true piece of horror, a slightly different interpretation on this requires you to be 'using' the horcrux for it to attempt a possession. There is one person who was trying to 'use' Harry for most of his life. Dumbledore. A lot of Dumbledore's more ...questionable... decisions can be put down to a little bit of Voldemort whispering into his ear. "Don't bring Moody in on the Horcrux hunt, Voldemort got to him once." "Don't trust Lupin or Black. A werewolf can still turn, and Black's insane from his time in prison." "Harry's too young to know what's going on yet."

* The Dementors are terrifying, but one could be forgiven for assuming they're not actually evil. After all, even [[HorrorHunger creatures who feed]] [[EmotionEater on happy memories]] need to eat, right? But pay attention at how their behavior is described: they target Harry mostly because he has the darkest memories of his peers, not because he has happiest memories. They're not looking for the best foodsource, ''[[ForTheEvulz they're looking for who to hurt the most while feeding]]''.
24th Dec '15 3:33:22 AM Freshmeat
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* One that could fit either here or in Horror (and will be included in both): The Dursleys are the actual heroes of the story. Imagine if Harry had come to Hogwarts weighing as much as Dudley, being as thick as a plank and with an ego the size of Mount Everest. He wouldn't have gotten anywhere (not to mention getting stuck in the trapdoor and the hole made in the rocks in the chamber) and wouldn't have any friends... so wouldn't have defeated Voldemort. Or, if he ''did'' have friends... they might have been people like Draco - whom canon Harry describes as ''reminding him of Dudley'' and Draco could have turned him to Death Eater ways... thus dooming the Wizarding World. Imagine it - the abusive magic hating Dursleys... saving the Wizarding World.

* If asked to sum this series up in one sentence, a great many ''Harry Potter'' fans would probably describe it--first and foremost--as a ComingOfAgeStory. [[CaptainObvious Which it is.]] But while the old "A Boy Becomes a Man" narrative is certainly nothing new in the world of prose fiction, one major distinguishing feature of ''Harry Potter'' is that it's a ComingOfAgeStory '''that spans multiple generations'''. Think about it: the later books are memorable, in large part, because we don't just get to see Harry and his teenage friends grow up--we also get to see many of the older characters in their youths, even after we've gotten comfy with them in their roles as adult authority figures. That's not an accident: Rowling takes pains to remind us that ''every'' seemingly larger-than-life adult figure in Harry's life had to start somewhere, and that Harry's path to adulthood has been trodden many times before. At one point, Albus Dumbledore was a self-doubting young man from a turbulent home, "Lord Voldemort" was an angry Half-Blood orphan named Tom Riddle, James Potter was an arrogant JerkJock who broke laws to help his friends, and Severus Snape was a lonely teenager obsessed with Dark Magic and being a Death Eater; yesterday's dreamers become tomorrow's leaders, yesterday's schoolyard bullies become tomorrow's armed bigots, and yesterday's friendships fuel tomorrow's crusades against injustice. The ultimate message of the ''Harry Potter'' series may, in fact, be about the importance of recognizing the potential of children '''in every era'''. For good or for ill, the future ''will'' be left in the hands of children--so ''don't'' underestimate them!

* One that could fit either here or in Brilliance (and will be included in both): The Dursleys are the actual heroes of the story. Imagine if Harry had come to Hogwarts weighing as much as Dudley, being as thick as a plank and with an ego the size of Mount Everest. He wouldn't have gotten anywhere (not to mention getting stuck in the trapdoor and the hole made in the rocks in the chamber) and wouldn't have any friends... so wouldn't have defeated Voldemort. Or, if he ''did'' have friends... they might have been people like Draco - whom canon Harry describes as ''reminding him of Dudley'' and Draco could have turned him to Death Eater ways... thus dooming the Wizarding World. Imagine it - the abusive magic hating Dursleys... saving the Wizarding World.
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