History Fridge / HarryPotter

18th Jul '16 8:38:22 AM kuchiki222
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* In ''Order of the Phoenix'', when Molly Weasley encounters a boggart in a locked cabinet, we're told what forms it takes - the lifeless bodies of her family: Ron, Bill, Arthur, Fred and George, Percy, and finally Harry. Did you notice that one tiny detail? Fred '''and''' George. Not even in Mrs. Weasley's worst nightmares could she imagine the twins being separated.

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* In ''Order of the Phoenix'', when Molly Weasley encounters a boggart in a locked cabinet, we're told what forms it takes - the lifeless bodies of her family: Ron, Bill, Arthur, Fred and George, Percy, and finally Harry. Did you notice that one tiny detail? Fred '''and''' George. Not even in Mrs. Weasley's worst nightmares could she imagine the twins being separated. [[spoiler: Come Deathly Hallows, and the twins are permanently separated, making this a FridgeHorror.]]
16th Jul '16 11:32:27 AM KizunaTallis
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** In the film of ''Chamber of Secrets'', Scabbers is half-transformed into a water goblet due to Ron's broken wand as a one-off gag. Keep in mind that Scabbers is just a transfigured human being- who knows what poor Peter Pettigrew was feeling?

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** In the film of ''Chamber of Secrets'', Scabbers is half-transformed into a water goblet due to Ron's broken wand as a one-off gag. Keep in mind that Scabbers is just a transfigured human being- being - who knows what poor Peter Pettigrew was feeling?



** Vanishing spells. Oh dear lord, ''vanishing spells''. A vanishing spell essentially atomizes the form of the thing you cast it on. The fifth years start out practicing it on snails, and the most difficult thing it's performed on are ''kittens''. Hermione- who owns a cat- is the only one able to do this successfully, and seemingly does so without objection. This spell essentially kills if you can do it right- keep in mind that the only other spell that can OneHitKill anything in Harry Potter is ''Avada Kedavera'', which is a curse that is banned under penalty of imprisonment in Azkaban. That at least leaves behind a body to be buried! Now, think about the fact that, in the last two books, several people go missing and are never heard from in the rest of the series...

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** Vanishing spells. Oh dear lord, ''vanishing spells''. A vanishing spell essentially atomizes the form of the thing you cast it on. The fifth years start out practicing it on snails, and the most difficult thing it's performed on are ''kittens''. Hermione- Hermione - who owns a cat- cat - is the only one able to do this successfully, and seemingly does so without objection. This spell essentially kills if you can do it right- right - keep in mind that the only other spell that can OneHitKill anything in Harry Potter is ''Avada Kedavera'', which is a curse that is banned under penalty of imprisonment in Azkaban. That at least leaves behind a body to be buried! Now, think about the fact that, in the last two books, several people go missing and are never heard from in the rest of the series...series...
* Rereading the fifth book, it becomes clear that Harry's "attitude problems" are a clear result of PTSD acquired from what happened in that graveyard with him and Voldemort. Realistically, his trauma should have become worse with Sirius' death, the Department of Mysteries fiasco, and knowledge of the prophecy, and that's not even getting to the [[ThereAreNoTherapists lack of emotional therapy]] in the Wizarding World. It makes the AngstWhatAngst charges against ''Half-Blood Prince'' easier to stick...
11th Jul '16 5:11:00 PM TheMightyHeptagon
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* In the infamous CruelTwistEnding of ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'', Harry [[spoiler: accidentally gets Sirius killed]] when he rushes to the Ministry of Magic to save him from Voldemort, only to find out that [[spoiler: Sirius was never in danger]] and Voldemort was trying to steal a prophecy that only Harry could retrieve--meaning that [[spoiler: Sirius died for nothing]] and Harry [[NiceJobBreakingItHero could have foiled Voldemort's plans if he'd just stayed at Hogwarts and told the adults what was going on]]. Sure, it seems like a perfect way to herald the series' descent into CerebusSyndrome turn...but it's actually the second time in the series that it happens. ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheSorcerersStone'' has almost exactly the same ending, where Harry rushes off to stop Voldemort from stealing the Sorcerer's Stone, only to find that it was sealed inside the Mirror of Erised, where Voldemort was physically incapable of retrieving it. Harry stops Voldemort in the end, but [[NiceJobBreakingItHero he also pulls the Stone out of the mirror after Voldemort fails to, nearly giving him the opportunity that he needs to take it]]; if he'd just told the adults what was going on instead of rushing off to play Hero, [[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot Voldemort almost certainly would have failed anyway]]. It's easy to miss, since ''Sorcerer's Stone'' actually [[EarnYourHappyEnding ends on a happy note]], but it's an early hint that Harry's ChronicHeroSyndrome isn't always for the best.
21st Jun '16 3:49:49 PM SCPIhpkmn
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* Transfiguration is objectively horrifying. You are teaching pre-teens and teenagers how to use magic that can create life, and destroy it just as easily. For instance:
** McGonagall starts her lessons with first years by turning her desk into a pig and back. For the few moments the pig was alive, it must have been terrified, not knowing what was happening, and then it just stopped existing.
** In the film of ''Chamber of Secrets'', Scabbers is half-transformed into a water goblet due to Ron's broken wand as a one-off gag. Keep in mind that Scabbers is just a transfigured human being- who knows what poor Peter Pettigrew was feeling?
** In the video games (especially the console version of ''Goblet of Fire'') it's common to kill enemies with a transfiguration spell, turning it into anything from a burst of orchids to a flock of birds to a pumpkin. They're monsters in the context of the game, yes, but the fact that Harry, Ron and Hermione do this in such a blase manner has rather disturbing implications.
** In both the book and the film of ''Goblet of Fire'', "Moody" (really Barty Crouch Jr.) transforms Draco into a ferret which he proceeds to float around with magic as a punishment. Draco is traumatized by the experience, showing that he was at least partially aware of what happened while in this form...
** Vanishing spells. Oh dear lord, ''vanishing spells''. A vanishing spell essentially atomizes the form of the thing you cast it on. The fifth years start out practicing it on snails, and the most difficult thing it's performed on are ''kittens''. Hermione- who owns a cat- is the only one able to do this successfully, and seemingly does so without objection. This spell essentially kills if you can do it right- keep in mind that the only other spell that can OneHitKill anything in Harry Potter is ''Avada Kedavera'', which is a curse that is banned under penalty of imprisonment in Azkaban. That at least leaves behind a body to be buried! Now, think about the fact that, in the last two books, several people go missing and are never heard from in the rest of the series...
10th Jun '16 11:50:30 PM tclittle
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** Are you seriously slutshaming a dead unnamed woman and an abused girl because their sons did bad things?
10th Jun '16 5:41:16 AM Pantomima
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**Are you seriously slutshaming a dead unnamed woman and an abused girl because their sons did bad things?
9th Jun '16 4:26:32 PM TheMightyHeptagon
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* Early on in the series, Harry and Hermione end up having to solve a simple logical puzzle in order to reach the coveted Philosopher's Stone, which baffles Harry because he (understandably) considers it a pretty weak defense. It even includes ''hints!'' But Hermione points out that it's actually an ingenious way to foil a Dark Wizard, since the Wizarding World is actually full of brilliant Wizards who depend so much on Magic that they forget how to use basic skills like logic. Say, what was the "power the Dark Lord knows not", again? It was ''love''--another seemingly basic concept that the brilliant sorcerer Voldemort didn't have the least bit of knowledge about, which allowed Harry to defeat him because he understood things like brotherhood, compassion and self-sacrifice. In an odd way, the potion challenge is an early hint that Magic isn't the most powerful weapon in the world, and that even the cleverest Wizards can be defeated by seemingly simple forces.
22nd May '16 5:52:30 PM bjshipley1
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*** Not to mention the fact that Hagrid is one of the people Dumbledore trusts absolutely, Hagrid is someone who can handle himself without resorting to magic (in case the Dursleys proved difficult,) plus it gave Hagrid a chance to use some magic when he normally wasn't allowed.
21st May '16 12:15:56 PM EDP
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** Also, many fans complain that Dumbledore sent a 'janitor' to retrieve Harry, who is revered as a hero by the wizards. Thing is, [[AllmightyJanitor Hagrid's two jobs at the time are rather important]]: as the Groundskeeper he controls access to Hogwarts' grounds, and as the Keeper of the Keys he controls access to the castle. As much as Draco Malfoy dismisses him as a servant, he's effectively the third most important member of Hogwarts' staff.

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** Also, many fans complain that Dumbledore sent a 'janitor' to retrieve Harry, who is revered as a hero by the wizards. Thing is, [[AllmightyJanitor [[AlmightyJanitor Hagrid's two jobs at the time are rather important]]: as the Groundskeeper he controls access to Hogwarts' grounds, and as the Keeper of the Keys he controls access to the castle. As much as Draco Malfoy dismisses him as a servant, he's effectively the third most important member of Hogwarts' staff.
20th May '16 1:13:24 PM Discar
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* How did Fred and George know how to use the Marauder's Map?
** They were most likely magically gifted to figure out what kind of enchantments that had been applied to it, thus figuring out exactly how it works. They possibly were able to recognize its potential when they first laid eyes on it
** Alternatively, the Marauders might have hexed the map so it would reveal itself to people who were as itching to cause trouble as they would. The books state pretty clearly that James and Sirius were as much as troublemakers as Fred and George, and the Marauders would have love it back then for their "legacy" to go on.
** It was passed down through generations of trouble makers. Just like how Fred and George taught Ron and Harry how to use it and then gave it to them.
** But they said they figured it out after nicking it from that file cabinet in Filch's office.
** Filch may have taken it from the users before Fred and George



* Dolores Umbridge: "Dolor" is Latin for pain or grief, which she gives both out in large quantities. "Umbrage" means taking offense, annoyance and displeasure. ''Everyone'' is annoyed and displeased by her tyrannical nature.)
** It's even more than that. She takes umbridge at a great many things, which she uses to justify her painful punishments. She's a parody of "nanny State" politicians, who justify their mean policies with stories about how immoral and deserving of punishment their targets are.

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* Dolores Umbridge: "Dolor" is Latin for pain or grief, which she gives both out in large quantities. "Umbrage" means taking offense, annoyance and displeasure. ''Everyone'' is annoyed and displeased by her tyrannical nature.)
** It's even more than that.
) She takes umbridge at a great many things, which she uses to justify her painful punishments. She's a parody of "nanny State" politicians, who justify their mean policies with stories about how immoral and deserving of punishment their targets are.



* Look at the cover of Philosopher/Sorcerer's Stone. Look at the cover of Deathly Hallows. Stone has a sunset in the background. DH has a sunrise in the background. Symbolically, you'd think it should be the other way around, until you realize every end is a beginning and vice-versa. The end of the Marauders is the beginning of Harry Potter. The end of his story is a new beginning for the wizarding world. Another way to take this bit of symbolism is that the series, metaphorically, is a descent into the dark of night (Voldemort's second reign). Harry going to school in the first book means that the prophecies (etc.) about Voldemort and Harry are going to come true, soon, and so the 'day' that happened after Voldemort's first reign of terror was ending. As others have mentioned, the artwork gets progressively darker, until things are "darkest before the dawn", like in the sixth book when Death Eaters have killed Dumbledore and are actively taking over the Ministry. Finally, in DH, the long night of Voldemort is over, and so the cover shows the dawning of a new, Voldemort-free day.
** The covers were all done by the same artist, Mary [=GrandPré=]. She uses a more mature style as the series progresses and the story lines become more mature.

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* Look at the cover of Philosopher/Sorcerer's Stone. Look at the cover of Deathly Hallows. Stone has a sunset in the background. DH has a sunrise in the background. Symbolically, you'd think it should be the other way around, until you realize every end is a beginning and vice-versa. The end of the Marauders is the beginning of Harry Potter. The end of his story is a new beginning for the wizarding world. Another way to take this bit of symbolism is that the series, metaphorically, is a descent into the dark of night (Voldemort's second reign). Harry going to school in the first book means that the prophecies (etc.) about Voldemort and Harry are going to come true, soon, and so the 'day' that happened after Voldemort's first reign of terror was ending. As others have mentioned, the artwork gets progressively darker, until things are "darkest before the dawn", like in the sixth book when Death Eaters have killed Dumbledore and are actively taking over the Ministry. Finally, in DH, the long night of Voldemort is over, and so the cover shows the dawning of a new, Voldemort-free day. \n** The covers were all done by the same artist, Mary [=GrandPré=]. She uses a more mature style as the series progresses and the story lines become more mature.



* At first it seem that Voldemort's line "Stand aside, you foolish girl" and offering to spare Lily's life was unimportant. Then ''Deathly Hallows'' rolls around, and [[spoiler:Snape admits he begged Voldemort for Lily's life. Because of this, he offered to spare Lily if she let him kill Harry, and ''she'' offered herself in place. When he killed her he essentially accepted the bargain, and then went back on it, ''which was why the spell backfired.'' Because Snape asked for Lily to live, Harry is the Chosen One! It could never have been anyone else.]] ''That'' is brilliant.

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* "Stand aside:"
**
At first it seem that Voldemort's line "Stand aside, you foolish girl" and offering to spare Lily's life was unimportant. Then ''Deathly Hallows'' rolls around, and [[spoiler:Snape admits he begged Voldemort for Lily's life. Because of this, he offered to spare Lily if she let him kill Harry, and ''she'' offered herself in place. When he killed her he essentially accepted the bargain, and then went back on it, ''which was why the spell backfired.'' Because Snape asked for Lily to live, Harry is the Chosen One! It could never have been anyone else.]] ''That'' is brilliant.



** Which doesn't help save Snape's life. Among 7 DADA teacher, only Lockhart and Umbridge survive, because they technicallly DIDN'T TEACH ANYTHING. From the ring's curse, we all know how strong Voldemort's curse can be. Snape and Remus temperatory survive because they both retire before the curse effect kick-in.



* How did James and Lily wind up together, when James was a JerkJock and Lily was a loyal friend who would fiercely stand up for what is right? Well... they're not that different. They're both very loyal to their friends, even when those friends betray them, they're both very intelligent, quite popular (though, as a muggle-born, Lily still may have felt like an outcast like Snape did), magically talented, and pretty brave. They're very much two sides of the same coin; Lily uses her personality for good, and James abuses it and becomes a JerkJock. But then James undergoes Character Development, and it's only then that Lily begins to think of him than something other than an 'arrogant toerag.' The central theme to the books is that choices make people who they are, not inborn traits-- Lily and James both made choices that made them the people who they were, and James's choices led to Lily finally falling for him!
** Also Lily's reaction to Snape comes from a bad first impression between James and Sirius and Snape. Initially she dismissed James out of loyalty to Snape, her childhood friend who was getting a hard time, so she generally censored all of James' good qualities. Once Snape was out of the picture, it probably became easier for her to appreciate James without having to qualify any criticism of Slytherins with "James Potter is a toerag" comments. It was likely that she was always attracted to James but held back because of his personality and his treatment of Snape.
** It's likely that she and Snape were never as close as Snape made it out to be. She always had problems with Snape being possessive, attacking Petunia because she "doesn't matter" and so on. Before Snape was the one who knew about magic and told Lily that she was special so perhaps she felt she depended on him since he knew more about magic than she did. But then at Hogwarts it was Lily who was coming to Snape's defense from her friends and against James, becoming a star pupil and growing in self-confidence and forthrightness. Their friendship mainly had commonality connection, them being the only magical people in the neighbourhood and living in the same area, once those barriers faded away there was not a lot in common between them and the rise of Voldemort merely brought that out.



* Harry´s explosive temper seems a bit odd, being him (generally) a calm and quiet boy. But then you remember he´s lived with [[HairTriggerTemper Vernon]] his complete life and it´s a lot more sense. First, he´s been repressed to express any feeling and second, that is the only way he knows to canalize his anger.
** Harry has been trained to bottle things up, so he has a long fuse and tends to internalize things even when he's angry. For example, he never actually tells Hermione that he's angry about the Firebolt, he just lets Ron engage with her. But when Harry explodes, he explodes.



* Hagrid is the one who brought Harry to the Dursleys, later reintroduced him to the Wizarding World, and then brought him away from Privet Drive for the last (on-screen) time. Hagrid is Hogwarts' ''Keeper of Keys''. Who better than him to lock Harry out for his own protection, later reopen his door to the Wizarding World, and finally bring Harry out of Privet Drive for good?

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* Hagrid fetching Harry:
**
Hagrid is the one who brought Harry to the Dursleys, later reintroduced him to the Wizarding World, and then brought him away from Privet Drive for the last (on-screen) time. Hagrid is Hogwarts' ''Keeper of Keys''. Who better than him to lock Harry out for his own protection, later reopen his door to the Wizarding World, and finally bring Harry out of Privet Drive for good?



* Knowing what we do about Horcruxes, imagine if you're a skilled witch or wizard who happens upon an object and because of your skill and knowledge you're able to recognize that it is a Horcrux (as Harry thought the guy at Borgin and Burkes might have been able to). You now know the following things:
** Somebody made it.
** The person who made it is a remorseless murderer.
** The person who made it is still alive and out there somewhere.
** A piece of that person is in it!
** That person might not be too happy that you found their Horcrux and identified it.
* Hogwarts has been around since the Middle Ages, when practicing sorcery was very much a punishable crime in Western Europe, and secular authorities could--and very often ''did''--have people arrested and executed on charges of practicing witchcraft. While the heyday of witch hunts may not have come until after the Protestant Reformation in the 1500's, it's easy to imagine how disastrous the consequences might have been if one of the Kings of England had discovered ''an active training ground for Witches and Warlocks within the borders of his kingdom''. The populace of Hogwarts is pretty damn lucky TheMasquerade has held up as long as it has.
** Not quite -- Sir Nicholas was a ''known'' wizard in the 1480s and was only executed in 1492 after a spell went wrong -- he gave a woman tusks when she asked him to fix her teeth. He was even ''knighted'' by Henry VII between 1485 and 1492, so at least one King of England knew of witches and wizards. And, if the WOMBAT answer is to be believed, then Anne Boleyn was a squib, meaning that the Howards, ''descended from Edward I'', had magic in them... which could have come from the Kings of England anyway. Not to mention that there is a picture of Mary I at Hogwarts with a wand, meaning that Henry VIII produced a witch child; Mary's mother, Catherine of Aragon, was descended from John of Gaunt... who was ''also'' a descendant of Edward I, meaning magic probably runs in the Royal Family.
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