History Fridge / HarryPotter

18th Feb '17 6:54:07 PM Kalu-chan
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* Werewolf pups. Explained in length [[http://kalu-chan.tumblr.com/post/157381393159/harry-potter-werewolf-pups here]], but the short version? Two werewolves in wolf form can mate (Fridge Horror in its own right, considering neither can give consent), causing the girl to get pregnant and give birth to a litter of incredibly intelligent wolf cubs.
12th Feb '17 8:34:52 AM TheMightyHeptagon
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* Madam Pomfrey never reports any students to Dumbledore or their Head of House even when she obviously knows they've been breaking rules. Harry explicitly says that she "never asks too many questions" in ''Chamber of Secrets''. It makes perfect sense that the person whose first and foremost responsibility is the health of the students wouldn't get people in trouble because that would discourage them from coming to her for help (such as when Ron is scared that she might recognize a dragon bite in ''Philosopher's Stone''). Many universities in the United States have similar policies regarding underage drinking.

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* Madam Pomfrey never reports any students to Dumbledore or their Head of House even when she obviously knows they've been breaking rules. Harry explicitly says that she "never asks too many questions" in ''Chamber of Secrets''. It makes perfect sense that the person whose first and foremost responsibility is the health of the students wouldn't get people in trouble because that would discourage them from coming to her for help (such as when Ron is scared that she might recognize a dragon bite in ''Philosopher's Stone''). Many universities in the United States have similar policies regarding underage drinking.drinking: even when doctors at the school infirmary recognize the signs of alcohol poisoning, they're not required to report students, because helping them is supposed to be their first concern.


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* The values of the four Houses of Hogwarts seem even more meaningful when you realize that they correspond perfectly to the four most "honorable" career paths in the Middle Ages, when Hogwarts was founded; Gryffindors are the students best suited to becoming knights, Hufflepuffs are well-suited to becoming monks (or nuns), Ravenclaws are likely to become scholars, and Slytherins are likely to be members of the nobility. To elaborate:
** Gryffindor's House Ghost is '''Sir''' Nicholas de Mimsy-Porpington, who was clearly knighted when he was alive, and their Common Room is guarded by the armored knight '''Sir''' Cadogan at one point. Their core values (courage, camaraderie, self-sacrifice, etc.) correspond quite closely with the tenets of the law of chivalry, and their emblem (a lion) is an animal usually portrayed as a natural warrior. Their founder, Godric Gryffindor, is also strongly implied to have been a knight, as he had a sword as his IconicItem, and he believed that people with a history of brave and noble deeds were most worthy of studying at Hogwarts--a philosophy befitting a "man of action" who valued deeds and accomplishments more than ancestry or personal traits.
** Hufflepuff's House Ghost is the Fat Friar, who was clearly part of the priesthood when he was still alive, and their Head of House (Pomona Sprout) is a botanist who spends most of her time cultivating plants--the kind of trade that keeps many monks occupied while they're sequestered in their abbeys and monasteries. Their core values (honesty, compassion, hard work, humility, etc.) quite aptly describe the lifestyle of monks, who are committed to caring for the sick and needy, and always keep themselves busy while resisting the allure of glory and wealth. Their founder, Helga Hufflepuff, also notably wanted to make Hogwarts open to '''all''' willing students who wanted to study there, much like monasteries have historically been places of sanctuary open to all, and much like the priesthood has historically been a career open to everyone (hence, why it was often seen as a "last resort" for people trying to escape their old life). And Helga Hufflepuff's IconicItem was a chalice, an item associated with the Christian communion.
** Ravenclaw's founder, Rowena Ravenclaw, openly believed that ''"Wit beyond measure is man's greatest treasure"'', she wanted to accept only the most intelligent students, and her house's values (intelligence, independence, creativity, etc.) correspond perfectly to the lifestyle of scholars and academics who devote their lives to pursuing the truth, even if it means flouting social conventions. It's likely not an accident that their Head of House, Filius Flitwick, is the one who teaches the main trio the first spell that we see them learning. And their House Ghost, the Grey Lady, is later revealed to have died as a result of pursuing an artifact that could have given her great knowledge. Also note that their emblem, the eagle, is an animal that's infamously difficult to train and domesticate--hence why "falconry" (the art of training birds of prey for hunting) is a highly specialized discipline that's often considered a mark of great education.
** Slytherin's House Ghost is the Bloody '''Baron''', and the two most prominent Slytherins in the series are '''Lord''' Voldemort and Severus Snape--who calls himself "The Half-Blood '''Prince'''". From what we see of Slytherin, their members tend to be much wealthier than the average Hogwarts student, and they tend to prize students from prominent Pureblood families over those of mixed ancestry. Their founder, Salazar Slytherin, even believed that Hogwarts should be open to only students of pure Wizarding ancestry--reflecting the values of nobles, whose entire world revolved around ancestry and familial inheritance. A major plot point in the second book even revolves around the identity of Salazar Slytherin's heir, making him the only one of the founders whose surviving bloodline actually plays a role in the plot. Their core values (ambition, self-preservation, cunning, leadership etc.) also correspond quite well with the traits of nobles who are burdened with the responsibility of governing realms, and must sometimes do morally questionable things for the good of their subjects. If you've read Machievelli's ''The Prince'', you'll notice that his philosophy overlaps pretty well with the Slytherin way of life.
8th Feb '17 6:29:50 AM TheMightyHeptagon
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** This is somewhat {{Lampshaded}} by Draco in the first book. He expressed strong disdain for Hufflepuff when he first met Harry. Also, both houses have their dormitories located in the dungeons, but while the Slytherin common room is gloomy and cold, from what we know of the Hufflepuff common room, it's warm and cozy. And yes, Gryffindors are more opposed to the Ravenclaws, in a RedOniBlueOni way, even with matching colors.

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** This is somewhat {{Lampshaded}} by Draco in the first book. He expressed strong disdain for Hufflepuff when he first met Harry. Also, both houses have their dormitories located in the dungeons, but while the Slytherin common room is gloomy and cold, from what we know of the Hufflepuff common room, it's warm and cozy. And yes, Gryffindors are more opposed to the Ravenclaws, in a RedOniBlueOni way, even with matching colors. Note that Godric Gryffindor and Rowena Ravenclaw also had diametrically opposed ideas about how to choose the worthiest students: unlike Hufflepuff and Slytherin, they seemed to support making Hogwarts a meritocracy, and they both wanted to look at students individually and choose them based on personal qualities--but Gryffindor thought that a history of brave and noble achievements was the most important personal quality, while Ravenclaw thought it was inherent cleverness.
** Also: ''Pottermore'''s official introduction for new Hufflepuffs outright states that Hufflepuff House has produced fewer Dark Wizards than any other Hogwarts house, and that that fact is one of their greatest points of pride (though they seldom brag about it). By contrast, Slytherin House has--of course--produced ''more'' Dark Wizards than any other House, and their official introduction even acknowledges that fact.
8th Jan '17 12:27:43 PM barryc10
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* The love protection magic that's being used to protect Harry is very neutral at best, malignant at worst, if you think about it. I mean, it's ancient magic, so its rules are going to be different. But the way it works is, as long as Harry calls #4 Privet Drive home, he's safe. Sounds fine, right? But consider this: Harry considered the place a prison ever since he started going to Hogwarts, even feeling like Hogwarts was his real home, yet he was still protected at Privet Drive? Then Half-Blood Prince came, and revealed the damning evidence. Harry doesn't need to feel at home in #4 Privet Drive in the modern sense of the phrase. All he needs is for Petunia to willingly continue to provide him with houseroom, no matter how reluctantly. Also, here's something else: If Harry ever leaves the property line before he turns 17, with the full understanding and intent of never returning, then every bit of protection that magic grants him will vanish in a snap, including his defense against pure evil. Think about it, the ultimate defense against evil Harry had required Harry to return to a very neglectful, borderline abusive household each summer, until he turned 17. Brrr.
30th Dec '16 2:40:17 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* In the infamous CruelTwistEnding of ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'', Harry [[spoiler: accidentally gets Sirius killed]] when he rushes to the Ministry of Magic to save him from Voldemort, only to find out that [[spoiler: Sirius was never in danger]] and Voldemort was trying to steal a prophecy that only Harry could retrieve--meaning that [[spoiler: Sirius died for nothing]] and Harry [[NiceJobBreakingItHero could have foiled Voldemort's plans if he'd just stayed at Hogwarts and told the adults what was going on]]. Sure, it seems like a perfect way to herald the series' descent into CerebusSyndrome turn...but it's actually the second time in the series that it happens. ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'' has almost exactly the same ending, where Harry rushes off to stop Voldemort from stealing the Philosopher's Stone, only to find that it was sealed inside the Mirror of Erised, where Voldemort was physically incapable of retrieving it. Harry stops Voldemort in the end, but [[NiceJobBreakingItHero he also pulls the Stone out of the mirror after Voldemort fails to, nearly giving him the opportunity that he needs to take it]]; if he'd just told the adults what was going on instead of rushing off to play Hero, [[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot Voldemort almost certainly would have failed anyway]]. It's easy to miss, since ''Philosopher's Stone'' actually [[EarnYourHappyEnding ends on a happy note]], but it's an early hint that Harry's ChronicHeroSyndrome isn't always for the best.

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* In the infamous CruelTwistEnding of ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'', Harry [[spoiler: accidentally gets Sirius killed]] when he rushes to the Ministry of Magic to save him from Voldemort, only to find out that [[spoiler: Sirius was never in danger]] and Voldemort was trying to steal a prophecy that only Harry could retrieve--meaning that [[spoiler: Sirius died for nothing]] and Harry [[NiceJobBreakingItHero could have foiled Voldemort's plans if he'd just stayed at Hogwarts and told the adults what was going on]]. Sure, it seems like a perfect way to herald the series' descent into CerebusSyndrome turn...but it's actually the second time in the series that it happens. ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'' has almost exactly the same ending, where Harry rushes off to stop Voldemort from stealing the Philosopher's Stone, only to find that it was sealed inside the Mirror of Erised, where Voldemort was physically incapable of retrieving it. Harry stops Voldemort in the end, but [[NiceJobBreakingItHero he also pulls the Stone out of the mirror after Voldemort fails to, nearly giving him the opportunity that he needs to take it]]; if he'd just told the adults what was going on instead of rushing off to play Hero, [[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot Voldemort almost certainly would have failed anyway]].anyway. It's easy to miss, since ''Philosopher's Stone'' actually [[EarnYourHappyEnding ends on a happy note]], but it's an early hint that Harry's ChronicHeroSyndrome isn't always for the best.
29th Dec '16 9:33:54 AM Chabal2
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* ''Fantastic Beasts'' introduces the concept of Obscurials, kids that turn into essentially sentient hurricanes due to having to keep their magic hidden away. Vernon's justification in the very first book for his (mis)treatment of Harry was to stamp Harry's "freakishness" out of him, imagine if he'd gone the CorporalPunishment route...
29th Dec '16 6:27:20 AM finalfaw
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** There is also the fact that J.K herself answered (when asked) that Voldemort being concieved under the effects of a love potion, may have caused some emotional connection problems 9even if it was only symbolicly)
24th Dec '16 5:58:34 PM TheMysteriousTroper
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** McGonagall starts her lessons with first years by turning her desk into a pig and back. For the few moments the pig was alive, it must have been terrified, not knowing what was happening, and then it just stopped existing.

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** McGonagall [=McGonagall=] starts her lessons with first years by turning her desk into a pig and back. For the few moments the pig was alive, it must have been terrified, not knowing what was happening, and then it just stopped existing.
23rd Dec '16 12:04:32 PM Da1tonTheGreat
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* In ''Goblet of Fire'', Voldemort explicitly states that three Death Eaters are absent from the meeting because they died in his service. Sure enough, only three Death Eaters are known to have died in the first war: Wilkes, Even Rosier, and Regulus Black. The first two were already mentioned earlier in the book, but the third is not mentioned until the next. However, then Sirius speculates that Regulus had fallen out of favor and was killed on Voldemort's orders, which would decidedly not be considered having died in his service. It is not revealed until ''Deathly Hallows'' that he died betraying Voldemort, who was unaware of this and incorrectly assumed he died loyal to him, while outsiders incorrectly assumed he had been killed by his fellow Death Eaters.
16th Dec '16 3:33:15 PM ScroogeMacDuck
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* According to Dumbledore, it is his use of Dark Magic in general (and of Horcruxes in particular) that led Voldemort to turn himself from a handsome dark-haired boy into a noseless snake-man who LooksLikeOrlock. Now, ''most'' of the damage is understood to have been caused by his making so many Horcruxes. Indeed, the only other character who is known to have possessed a Horcrux, the Ancient Greek wizard [[http://harrypotter.wikia.com/wiki/Herpo_the_Foul Herpo the Foul]], who only made one horcrux, looks a ''little'' snakelike, with a rather flat nose and slightly slit-pupiled eyes.
** On the same topic, a neat little piece of continuity that is exclusive to the movies (and might have actually been accidental): when we see him on the back of Quirrel's head in ''Philosopher's Stone'', Voldemort does look rather snakelike, but, among other details, still has an actual nose, if a rather flat one. When we meet him again in the flesh in ''Goblet of Fire'', he now completely lacks a nose. Well, of course he does; he's just come out of an ''extremely'' dark resurrection ritual that involved drinking snake's venom, someone cutting off their own hand and torturing a teenager. If ''that'' couldn't corrupt Voldemort, we don't know what will.
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