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Tabletop Game: Scrabble
Scrabble is a long-standing board game involving words and letters. The game traces back to 1938, when Alfred Mosher Butts invented Criss-Crosswords, a game with a 15×15 board and individual letter tiles. He tabulated the frequency of various letters to determine the frequency and letter value of each tile.

James Brunot adapted the game into Scrabble and tweaked the rules somewhat, making them simpler. Although not a success at first, Scrabble allegedly gained popularity after the president of R.H. Macy’s played the game and was surprised that it wasn’t for sale in his stores. The game sold well there, and in 1952, Selchow and Righter picked up the rights to it. Since then, it has become an internationally popular game.

Typically played by two to four players, Scrabble involves a 15×15 playing board and 100 letter tiles (98 letters and two blanks). Each letter has a point value assigned to it: common letters such as E are only one point, while Z and Q are the highest at 10 points each. The blank tiles are wild, and can be used as any letter. The board contains squares that double or triple the value of each word or letter.

Scrabble has also been adapted into a well-known Game Show format for NBC. Hosted by Chuck Woolery, it simplified the rules even further and set up each word with an Incredibly Lame Pun. For more info on the game show version, go here.

The documentary Word Wars follows around high-level tournament players and came out in 2004.

Tropes present:

  • Artificial Stupidity/Non-Indicative Difficulty: Playing against the computer on the hardest level is only hard because the game only uses the highest-scoring word it can muster, clobbering the human through a high score. The computer, however, utterly stinks at strategy. In its effort to lay down the highest scoring words that it can it will open up plays a human would not - like ending a word on or one space away from the edge of the board is asking for someone to use a triple word score (or two!).
  • Difficult but Awesome: Learning the official two-letter word list can be this, but is basically a must for anybody who wants to be competitive at this game. For instance, X can make a two-letter word with every vowel: AX, EX, XI, OX, XU. You're welcome.
  • Loophole Abuse: It is, technically, perfectly legal to play words that lexically don't exist — you just have to pay the penalty if you're challenged. If you can bluff your opponents into thinking it's a real word and not challenging, you're good to go. In fact, if a word is challenged but turns out to be good after all, the challenger has to pay the penalty in turn! (This last rule holds in America but is not universal — in some places there is no penalty for an incorrect challenge, or there is a five-point penalty).
    • This even works in tournaments. While in electronic Scrabble games, the computer typically won't let you play unapproved words, the judges at tournaments understand that this is a part of the game and will not point out that a word is invalid unless the word is challenged.
  • Not Cheating Unless You Get Caught: See Loophole Abuse.
  • Perfectly Cromulent Word: This trope tends to crop up a lot if you spectate championship-level games.
  • Score Multiplier: The bonus squares.
  • Scrabble Babble: Trope Maker and Trope Namer.
  • Sesquipedalian Loquaciousness: Is helpful in the game... depending on the situation.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: Online, Words With Friends. Essentially the same game minus a few rule differences and placement of bonus tiles. So similar, in fact, that its developer was sued by Hasbro. In a bit of irony, Hasbro eventually bought it, and even released a board game version of it...which sells right next to Scrabble in stores.
  • Spin-Off: Scrabble Jr. is a well-known children's adaptation.
  • You Make Me Sic: This game will really surprise you when you find some of your friends can't spell for crap.

Works that Scrabble appears in:

  • Foul Play: Old ladies are playing through a window as the main characters pass by.
    [Ethel and Elsie are playing Scrabble. Ethel has just put down the letters "fucker", to which Elsie has added "muther" at the beginning]
    Ethel: Wait, Elsie. I think you're wrong. I think you spell that word with a hyphen.
  • Non-Fiction book Word Freak covers the world of competitive Scrabble, as does the movie Word Wars.
  • Heavenly Creatures: Pauline spells out the word PUTRID.
  • Sneakers: Scrabble tiles are used to solve an anagram.
  • Daria: Daria adds "incarce" to "rate" in the episode "Big House".
  • That '70s Show: Red and Kitty are playing Scrabble with their neighbors, Bob and Midge. Red has recently discovered that Bob is bald, and he has "QBALL" on his rack. Meanwhile, Midge has "ZYGOTE" and sheepishly admits she's got nothing.
  • A strip in Calvin and Hobbes has both characters playing the most outrageous words and getting ridiculously high scores from them. Another has Calvin spelling only two-letter words like "be" (complaining that he lacks vowels on his rack) whereas Hobbes wins big with words like "nucleoplasm".
  • There's a scary short story about a man who plays Scrabble with his wife. Any time either of them spells out a word, that word takes place on the other person. (For example, FLY causes a fly to appear or something.) It ends when the wife plays DEATH... The story is called "Death by Scrabble".
  • In Two and a Half Men, Alan plays online Scrabble and has played the actual game with Rose, Chelsea and one of Jake's teachers.
    Chelsea: Wow. You really take this seriously, don't you?
    Alan: It's Like I Always Say: The losers finish with a rack full of tiles.
  • Metalocalypse: In the episode "Klokblocked", Skwissgaar spells "quhzk". To quote Toki:
    Yeah, "Quhzk"s. That's whats a duck says.
  • In the National Film Board Of Canada cartoon "The Big Snit", a husband and wife are playing Scrabble. He is staring at his letters, unable to spell anything with them. A reverse shot reveals that his tiles are "EEEEEEE".
  • In the Curb Your Enthusiasm episode "Car Periscope", Larry plays Scrabble with an elderly man, who shocks him by putting down "coon".
  • In The Sopranos, Meadow is playing with Jackie Jr. He complains that she's not allowed to play "Spanish words". The word Meadow played was "oblique", which he pronounces "ob-lik-ay".
  • In her memoir Bossy Pants, Tina Fey says that her "proudest moment as a child" was beating her uncle at Scrabble with the word "farting".
  • Done in this xkcd comic, which suggests use of the word "CLITORIS" without spelling it, of course.
  • In The Simpsons, Bart spells out "KWYJIBO".
  • In ALF, Alf spells out "QUIDNUNC". The rest of the players challenge him but they later learn that it is an actual word (one who enjoys gossip). Alf takes this up a notch by using his extra turn to spell out "QUIDNUNCLE".
  • Goof Troop has a game where Goofy takes nearly a half an hour to take his turn, decides not to play "cat" because he doesn't have enough k's, chooses to spell the word "sesquipedalian", and gets falsely accused of Scrabble Babble by Pete for it.
  • Charlie's Angels Movie: Dylan and Eric Knox were playing Scrabble at one point on their evening. The next morning, Dylan spells out "ENEMY" when The Dragon shows up, not knowing that Eric himself was the Big Bad.
  • Steve and Alex Keaton spend a whole episode Family Ties playing Scrabble, as they use increasingly hilarious strategies and questionable words to try to get an advantage, such as Alex hoarding U's to prevent anyone from getting rid of a Q.
  • In one of the Myth-O-Mania books, "Hit The Road, Helen", Persephone and Hades play this. The second game has Hades playing war words since this mind is worrying about the "Trojan War".
  • The end of the Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. episode "Repairs" has most of Coulson's team playing a game, though the only move shown is when Simmons makes the word aglet.

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alternative title(s): Scrabble
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