Series / The Late Late Show

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A late-night television show on CBS, directly following The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Previous hosts include Tom Snyder (1995-98), Craig Kilborn (1999-2004), and Craig Ferguson (2005-14), who won a 2009 Peabody Award for Excellence in Electronic Media for the episode A Night with Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

The current host for the program is English actor-comedian James Corden (who you might remember from Gavin and Stacey, The Wrong Mans, and two episodes of Doctor Who).

Not to be confused with the second longest-running chat show of all time (after The Tonight Show), which is made and broadcast in Ireland on RTÉ.

Specific series who have their respective pages:


Tropes associated with The Late Late Show include:

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    Tom Snyder's run 

    Craig Kilborn's run 
  • Asexuality: A recurring skit featured Kilborn portraying "Sebastian, the Asexual Icon", whose entire gimmick is a complete disdain for/obliviousness to any form of sexual activity whatsoever, as well as a possible lack of (functioning) genitals. On a demonstration of the former:
    Sebastian: Whenever I get the urge to...touch it...I mace myself.
  • Guest Host: After Kilborn left, several people rotated as guest hostsnote . The guests were whittled down to four finalists — D. L. Hughley, Damien Fahey, Michael Ian Black, and of course, Craig Ferguson — who hosted one week each.
  • Mythology Gag: Kilborn also had the segments "5 Questions" and "A Moment For Us", which he had originated on The Daily Show. He brought his "5 Questions" segment to his short-lived weeknight show, The Kilborn File.
  • Running Gag: Dick Vermeil's teary Super Bowl victory speech, the PG&E rapping grandmother.
  • Title Theme Tune: "The Late Late Show is starting. The Late Late Show is starting now...with Mr. Kilborn." Sung by Chris Isaak, no less.

    James Corden's run 
  • Adorkable: James is unabashedly gleeful at having this gig. He squees his way through each show and it makes him all the more endearing.
  • Biting-the-Hand Humor: James gently tweaked CBS for their decision to fill the summer gap in the 11:35 slot between David Letterman's retirement and Stephen Colbert's debut with episodes of various prime time dramas by doing cold open sketches with a Talking Dead-style companion talk show for its reruns of The Mentalist, Talking Mentalist. Later accompanied by a spin-off, Talking Talking Mentalist (in which they talk about the previous Talking Mentalist), and a successor in Talking Hawaii Five-0, complete with bonus Chris Hardwick.
  • Cold Open: Unusually for a late night talk show, James does his monologue before the title sequence.
  • Corpsing: In this installment of Celebrity Noses, the guitarist behind Reggie is just barely keeping it together whenever the camera cuts back to them.
    • The members of One Direction are clearly laughing during the "BALL IN YOUR FACE" scene in the "Dodgeball with One Direction" sketch - the camera pans quickly so it's less obvious, but they're obviously laughing.
    • James himself can quite hold it together after a few choice ad-libs from Neil Patrick Harris during their Riff-Off.
  • Even the Guys Want Him: Speaking of guest Chris Pine:
    James: I don't know whether to shake his hand or lick his face.
    • Matt Bomer evokes a similar reaction (complete with fantasy sequence!).
  • Hidden Depths: Despite his major role in Into the Woods, celebrities in the Carpool Karaoke are usually baffled when James busts out a hell of a tune.
  • I Want You to Meet an Old Friend of Mine: Naturally, several former co-stars and acquaintances of James have made appearances on the show. Anna Kendrick, in particular, has put in a number of appearances in addition to co-starring with James in Into the Woods and Trolls.
  • Old Shame: As mentioned below, James loves to bring up an embarrassing early project/experience of one of his guests and showing a clip or picture (much like Graham Norton, whose show's format is very similar to James'). Their reactions are usually...
  • Oh, Crap!: Eddie Redmayne's reaction when James shows a clip of him singing "Memory" from their high school years.
    Eddie: I knew coming onto this show was a bad idea!
    • Natalie Portman reacts similarly when her old environmental pop group, the Earth Patrol Kids, are shown.
  • Please Subscribe to Our Channel: On the June 8, 2016 episode, Corden discusses the policy that CBS must buy any fictitious domain name mentioned on his show so it doesn't get squatted by someone else. In this case, it happened to be YourMomMassagesMe.com. However, with James acknowledging how hilarious it sounded, the producers seized the opportunity by making it a real site where you can upload a picture of yourself and your mom in a photo of a stick figure massaging another. His discussion of it then turned into a ticket plug (suggesting that you should take your mom to a taping, and could possibly be massaged there). Then it turned into a plug for his Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts, and then an Overly Long Gag in which Corden listed off every single social networking service or app he is supposedly on.
  • Re Tool: This version of the show shakes up the format somewhat by having multiple guests come out and be interviewed together for the duration of the show (a common mechanic of British talk shows), rather than having them come out one at a time and sometimes having the first guest leave (the U.S. standard). Also, the seating arrangement is flipped with James sitting to the left of the screen rather than the right like every other host does. James also pulls his chair right next to the couch rather than interviewing from behind his desk.
  • Running Gag: Reggie Watts announces James as being from a different city at the start of each episode. In recent episodes, he has begun saying a city, but attaching it to a completely different location. For example, he introduced James as being from Milwaukee, Illinois. There is no town in Illinois called Milwaukee.
  • Serial Escalation: Sting and James performed a sketch where they played rival singing waiters engaged in a war of oneupsmanship with each coming back with a more ludicrous way of performing for the restaurant's patrons.
  • Side-Effects Include...: Invoked by a recurring sketch, showing side effects of various activities.
  • Troubled Production: invoked "I smell a good time, you smell a good time: it's time for Celebrity Noses!" It is purportedly some type of game, but it promptly goes wrong in various ways (such as Reggie having issues getting the theme music right, the intro graphic glitching, James losing the cards, Reggie insisting the segment be broadcast online via Periscope even though it's going to be on TV eventually, and "human error" causing intros for other segments to come up instead), then they run out of time and can't even do the segment. The Christmas edition went as far as doing a Smash to Black after James was repeatedly told by the producer (specifically, Ben Winston, the actual co-executive producer) that they were out of time.
    • Of course, something eventually going wrong is the point of the sketch, because an actual segment devoted to looking at celebrities' noses is a terrible idea, since one can just go on the Internet, and look at them themselves. But, it is still not completely clear what Celebrity Noses is actually supposed to involve.
    • Also, one of the writers will play a fictional expert in some field (from science to even gift-wrapping) with the name of a European soccer player (especially those who played in the English Premier League) to do a segment towards the end of the show. Unfortunately, Reggie and the band don't stop playing, causing there to be no time left for the segment. This usually results in the "expert" taking their anger out on James, to the point that they storm out of the studio, or James has to call for security.
    • A segment where James is to take questions about him or the show from the audience is always thrown off by someone asking something irrelevant. Once, it was nothing but questions about the parking situation at CBS Studio City.
  • What an Idiot: invoked People who pick anything but "D: None of the above" in the studio audience game called "None of the Above."
    Audience member: I'm going to go with "B".
    James: I'm going to make sure you'd like to go with "B" even though the game is called "None of the Above."
    Audience member: Can I change my answer?
    James: Oh, no, noooo, you can stick with B if you want!
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