Music: Death

Chuck Schuldiner, Gene Hoglan, and a bunch of other guys.

Death were the first true Death Metal band. While Possessed may have been the first to release an album in the death metal idiom, Death were the first to play the "classic" style of death metal, separating it from Thrash Metal altogether, and their debut album Scream Bloody Gore has been described as death metal's first definitive article.

Initially, Chuck Schuldiner formed the band Mantas at the age of 16; after about a year, he dissolved the band and formed Death. After a lot of members were fired and hired by Schuldiner, the band's first album, Scream Bloody Gore (1987) was released. It is considered a landmark album of the genre, pretty much starting the trend for gory lyrics and brutality. Eventually, though, more "brutal" bands such as Deicide and Morbid Angel came along and out-brutalised Death. So, rather than up the heaviness, Schuldiner continued to grow musically, eventually heading in a more progressive direction starting with the album Human. Their transformation into a progressive/technical death metal band was one of the things that kickstarted that subgenre, along with the bands Atheist and Cynic.

The group, with its ever-changing lineup of members, disbanded in 2001 when Schuldiner died of complications from brain cancer at 34. The band remains one of the most influential death metal bands of all time, and Schuldiner is recognised as the "father of death metal", though he often downplayed the name "death metal" later in his career and regarded Death as a straightforward metal band towards the end of the band's lifetime.

Schuldiner was also one of two guitarists for Control Denied, a progressive metal band, which is considered the continuation of Death. In fact, many of the tracks on Death's final album Sound of Perseverence were originally intended to be Control Denied songs, but Schuldiner caved to studio pressure and used them for a final Death album instead. He intended to disband Death, at least temporarily, to focus on Control Denied, but his long illness ended that plan.

Their albums are:
  • Scream Bloody Gore, 1987
  • Leprosy, 1988
  • Spiritual Healing, 1990
  • Human, 1991
  • Individual Thought Patterns, 1993
  • Symbolic, 1995
  • The Sound of Perseverance, 1998

Not to be confused with Death, the 70s punk band, or Death.


Death has examples of the following tropes:

  • Big Brother Is Watching: Discussed in "1,000 Eyes".
  • Careful with That Axe: The Sound of Perseverance has Chuck doing insanely inhuman screams throughout the whole album.
  • Contrived Coincidence: A tragic example, Schuldiner was the only constant member and leader of a band that constituted a bona-fide multitude of people; of those members of Death, only Schuldiner has died (though guitarist James Murphy also had a cancer-related scare himself).
  • Cover Version: "Painkiller", the final track on The Sound of Perseverance, and a version of KISS's "God of Thunder" on the Japanese version of of Human before getting a worldwide release on the 2011 reissue of the same album.
  • Dead Artists Are Better - Chuck Schuldiner gets this treatment somewhat. While Death's music has always been well-respected, the bad reputation he had (see Insufferable Genius below) for a long period in his career is rarely brought up anymore.
  • Death Metal: The Trope Maker and, alongside Possessed's demo Death Metal, the Trope Namer.
  • Dystopia: "Genetic Reconstruction"; "1,000 Eyes"
  • Epic Rocking: A couple of songs in their early career (the title tracks of Leprosy and Spiritual Healing), as well as several songs off Symbolic and The Sound of Perseverance.
  • The Fundamentalist: "Crystal Mountain" was based off of Chuck's fundamentalist neighbors. "The Philosopher" is about someone who acts like a fundamentalist.
  • Garfunkel: Pretty much everyone in the band aside from Chuck Schuldiner. Though he wasn't the only well-known member - Gene Hoglan, Paul Masvidal, Chris Reifert and Andy LaRocque all played with the band.
  • Genre Shift: From death metal to tech-death to progressive death metal.
    • The Sound of Perseverance also has some heavy hints of Power Metal, as many of its tracks were originally intended to be Control Denied material, but the label wanted another Death album, so Chuck included them on the album after changing them only slightly.
  • Gorn: The lyrical content on Scream Bloody Gore and, to a lesser degree, Leprosy. However, they moved away from gory lyrics with Spiritual Healing, and never looked back.
  • I Am the Band: Chuck Schuldiner. Most notable on Scream Bloody Gore, where he played bass and the only thing not done by him for the album was Chris Reifert's drumming. Chuck also played bass on Leprosy.
  • Instrumentals: Two of them: "Cosmic Sea" off Human, and "Voice of the Soul" off The Sound of Perseverance.
  • Insufferable Genius: Depending on who you ask, Chuck had a bit of a problem with this, stemming mostly from his desire to keep things as professional as possible and a complete lack of tolerance for infighting. When someone wasn't working out, Chuck seldom gave them a second chance and usually just threw them out and burned all associated bridges; as logic would dictate, this didn't exactly give him the best of reputations. This was more than likely due to the incredibly dysfunctional nature of the band around the time of Spiritual Healing, which left such a bad taste in Chuck's mouth that he vowed to never allow himself to be placed in that position again.
  • Jerk Ass: Kam Lee. Between numerous tales of his egocentric, unprofessional, and incredibly unpleasant demeanor and his habit of doing nothing but slamming people in interviews in an incredibly crude, vulgar, and immature manner, Lee's name has been synonymous with "asshole" for a long time. His enmity with Chuck is legendary, but he was burning bridges with others well after he left Death.
  • Lead Bassist: Starting with Steve DiGiorgio, all of their bassists were Type A examples, though DiGiorgio doubled as a Type C due to his immensely influential nature among metal bassists and prolific session appearances.
  • Mohs Scale of Rock and Metal Hardness: Originally at 10, later moved down to 9 as they progressed as a band.
    • The mostly-acoustic song Voice Of The Soul is about a 5 or maybe even a low 6.
  • Mr. Fanservice: Chuck performed shirtless on plenty of occasions.
  • New Sound Album: Human (which began their venture into Technical Death Metal) and Symbolic (which marked a venture into a more progressive direction). Also averted, as Schuldiner started Control Denied to be more progressive (and change vocalists) without "betraying" fans of Death's Harsh Vocals.
  • Nice Guy: Chuck. Despite having Insufferable Genius syndrome, he was a rather nice and open minded individual. He was pretty modest with of his musical career, feeling Death was just a 'metal band', didn't want to talk credit for the genre and even felt the title he was given "The Father of Death Metal" a bit too much.
  • Progressive Metal: The latter four albums.
  • Punctuated! For! Emphasis!: Schuldiner loved this trope. His performance in "The Philosopher" and "Lack Of Comprehension" turned the word lies into a metalhead in-joke.
  • Religion Rant Song: "Crystal Mountain" is a Type 3, about why proselytizing is forcing yourself on other people.
  • Split Personality: "Defensive Personalities"
  • Surprisingly Gentle Song: "Voice of the Soul"
  • Take That: "Out of Touch" is directed at extreme metal bands who sacrificed musical quality for brutality and shock value and "Low Life" was almost certainly aimed at Kam Lee. "The Philosopher" is often rumored to be aimed at Paul Masvidal, but Paul himself has denied this and said there was no feud between him and Chuck.
  • Title Only Chorus: "Scream Bloody Gore", "Zombie Ritual", "Evil Dead".
  • Trope Maker: While Possessed's album Seven Churches is the first full-length death metal album, Death are considered to be co-trope makers along with Possessed, turning death metal into an actual subgenre instead of just an extreme thrash metal variant.
  • Vocal Evolution: Chuck's voice on Symbolic and especially The Sound of Perseverance was considerably higher.
  • Wolverine Publicity: James Murphy, Gene Hoglan, and Steve DiGiorgio have all become well-known for this. Murphy was the go-to in the 90s if you played death metal and wanted a cool shred solo; basically, if you're listening to a song from a death metal act that isn't really known for dazzling leadwork from that time period that breaks into a blazing neoclassical lead, they probably got Murphy to do it. The other two, meanwhile, are just known for making it their life's missions to play in just about every band ever.
  • Word Salad Lyrics: A good chunk of Control Denied's songs had this, with a stand out example being
    "When the link they breathe becomes missing."