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One, Two, Three, Four, Go!
In Japanese, "Go" means "five". But many Japanese are also aware that it means "move forward" or "take action" in English. So when the word is mixed into Gratuitous English, or included as Gratuitous Japanese, it becomes a pun, having both meanings at once.

This could apply to titles, names, dialog, and many things related to a Five-Man Band.

Perhaps in straight Japanese, the pun is there, but someone who knows Japanese would have to explain how the pun is there in any such examples.

Popular in both Manga, Anime, and Animesque shows.

Seven Is Nana is a Sister Trope. Compare Goroawase Number for other Japanese number wordplay.

Examples (Please be sure to explain how they fit here)

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     Anime and Manga  
  • The original title for Speed Racer is Mach Go Go Go after the car, which is called the "Mach Go". So calling it the "Mach 5" in the dub just made sense. Since the word "number" can be pronounced "go" as well, an accurate translation of the original title would be "Mach #5, Go!" - all 3 "go"s have different meanings.
    • It helps that Speed's original Japanese name was "Go".
    • For those who care, "go" doesn't exactly mean "number," though it frequently can be used as such—it's a suffix attached to the name of a vehicle, which frequently do involve numbers but don't have to. E.g. Tetsujin Nijuhachi-go is literally "Iron Man #28", but Captain Harlock's ship, the Arcadia, is also referred to as "Arcadia-go" in Japanese.
  • Go Lion (Voltron in America) is made of five lions, and they shout "Let's Go Lion!" before forming.
  • In one episode of Fushigiboshi No Futago Hime, Bumo, Evil Counterpart to Pumo, disguises himself as the latter and tries to lead the main characters into a trap by explaining that the answer their Crystal Fortulette gave (6) meant to go to the Thorn (Ibara) Mansion, since one (ichi) and five (go) add up to six.
  • Yes! Pretty Cure 5 Go Go! is the second series of that franchise featuring a Five-Man Band.
  • In Hikaru no Go, Hikaru wears a shirt with the number 5 on it. And he's a go player.
  • Usually races in Initial D start with a different countdown, but this one appears a few times.
  • The song "Gohan wa Okazu" ("Rice as a Side Dish") from K-On!! episode 20 contains the refrain "Ichi, ni, san, shi, gohan!" (One, two, three, four, rice!")
  • Opening 15 of One Piece, "We Go!", has the refrain "Ichi, ni, sunshine, yon, WE GO!" The romanization of "sunshine" is "san-sha-in," in which "san" is the traditional three.
    • Five tiny mermaid quins are named Ichika, Nika, Sanka, Yonka and... Yonka Two.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh! 5Ds: Yusei's D-Wheel is called the Yusei Go. Its Wikia page should give some insights on the many possible meanings/puns of the name.

     Live Action TV  
  • The original Super Sentai show Himitsu Sentai Goranger.
    • Engine Sentai Go-onger. The title theme even mimics the trope name. (Ichi, ni, san, shi, Go-onger!)
      • Referenced in Kaizoku Sentai Gokaiger, where Sosuke (Go-On Red) uses that particular song lyric to count before attempting a long jump in order to enter a passage to Gunman World.
    • Rescue Sentai GoGoFive can be read as "(19)99note  Sentai 555".note 
    • Tokumei Sentai Go-Busters is an odd example, as despite having "Go" in its name it features a Power Trio rather than a full Five-Man Band. At the same time, it references the trope practically by name in the opening lyrics... even though 2 and 3 are switched around.
    • Taiyou Sentai Sun Vulcan uses a variation, punning on "san" (three) and "sun" with the lyric "One plus two plus Sun Vulcan".
  • In the live-action Negima series (Negima!!, for those keeping score), they use it in the opening theme Pink Generation. (Warning: Massive Ear Worm ahead.) (This video has an English subtitle if you turn captions on.)

     Music 

     Sports 
  • When Ichiro Suzuki came to the United States to join the Seattle Mariners baseball team in 2001, he was given the uniform number 51. Which means that when read as individual numerals, his uniform number is "Go", and "ichi". This fits well with the common fan chant, "Go, Ichi! Go, Ichi! Go, Ichi!"

     Video Games  
  • In Dance Dance Revolution Ultramix 4, one of the songs is entitled "GO!" — getting its title from its 5/4 time signature. Throughout the track, a voice can be made out in the background counting off in Japanese.
    • Pump It Up Pro 2 has a different remix of the same "GO!" song mentioned above, with the same time signature issues.

     Web Comics 
  • Mushroom Go: At the beginning of the comic, Go becomes the fifth member of the Chainless.

     Western Animation  


One-Liner, Name... One-LinerThis Trope Name References ItselfParrot Expo-what?
Once for Yes, Twice for NoLanguage TropesOrphaned Etymology
Onee-samaJapanese Media TropesOrochi
KotobagariUsefulNotes/Japanese LanguageSeven Is Nana
One-Two PunchlineJust for Pun'Open!" Says Me

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