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Haunted House Historian
Cinema Snob: Since they killed off Crazy Ralph in the last film, they need some other drunken wacko to warn them away. Sure if this guy talked to them without being a lunatic that might help. But since the fucking meat-wagon didn't give them the hint to stay away, I don't think anything this guy does would'a helped.
Crazy Ralph: [Holds up a severed eyeball] I have warned thee... I... have warned thee.

The Haunted House Historian is a character who knows the Back Story of a Haunted House, Indian Burial Ground, Eldritch Location, Abandoned Hospital, and other evil location. Right around the time the fresh meat— err, "Main Cast" come in or near the evil location and start getting picked off one by one, the Haunted House Historian will intervene. He or she may exposit on the history of the haunted house, or try (emphasis on try) to take matters into their own hands to save lives or keep the house's secret.

Usually they are introduced early in the first act, and they know the terrible secret of the location either by being present, inheriting the secret from someone who was there, or most rarely, simply researching it themselves.

The Haunted House Historian is usually in the difficult position over whether to try and warn the protagonists because one or more of the following applies:
  • The secret is so incredibly bizarre that they'd be labeled as insane and ignored.
  • They were involved with the secret and want to keep it hidden to avoid jail, the shame involved, or to protect another. It may be My Greatest Failure, and they are The Atoner looking to warn away the clueless.
  • The secret is incredibly dangerous but not lethal unless tampered with, and the historian knows what will awaken or release the threat. Vehemently telling the cast to avoid X usually backfires because it makes them curious and actively seek it out and set it free. The double edge to this sword is that not knowing what will set it off means the main cast will inevitably blunder into it.

As the most knowledgeable on the threat the historian is likely to be The World's Expert on Getting Killed. However, while the Haunted House Historian does have an element of Mr. Exposition, they may only know a bit more than the characters and leave the characters to do their own research into the exact nature of the threat. They also usually form relationships with the new arrivals, and can be very active in the plot. This is exposition plus plot structure and character development.


Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • The Jusenkyo Guide in Ranma always attempts to warn travelers not to fall into the Jusenkyo springs, but his warnings are often ignored until after someone has been cursed.

Film
  • Mr. Harris in the 2010 Don't be Afraid of the Dark.
  • Watson Pritchet in House on Haunted Hill (1959) and its remake.
  • In The Haunting (1963), Mrs. Dudley actively plays this to scare the people staying in the mansion into being careful. Nell parodies the creepy speech she'd heard earlier back at her when she repeats it to Theo.
    Mrs. Dudley: I set dinner on the dining room sideboard at six. Breakfast is ready at nine. I don't stay after dinner. Not after it begins to get dark. We live in town, nine miles, so there won't be anyone around if you need help...
    Nell: We couldn't even hear you.
    Mrs. Dudley: No one could. No one lives any nearer than town...
    Nell: No one will come any nearer than that.
    Mrs. Dudley: In the night...
    Nell: In the dark.
  • Ben Fischer (Roddy McDowell) in The Legend Of Hell House, as sole survivor of a previous investigative team, provides the backstory of the Belasco House, called the "Mount Everest of haunted houses." He relates the evil debauchery that started it all, as well as the dire fates of his colleagues on the earlier mission. Fischer advised the others on the team to do nothing to provoke the forces in the house and wait for the week to pass so they can live and collect their fees. As the casualties mount, Fischer is persuaded/forced by circumstances to take action.
  • The Watcher in the Woods has Mrs. Aylwood.
  • Justified in 1408, where the hotel manager proves knowledgeable about the troubled past of his room 1408.
  • Played for laughs in Dark and Stormy Night, where several characters take turns telling various bits of connecting backstory on a number of curses, recent murders, escapes from institutes for the criminally insane, and prophecies.
    Jack: I'll take this one, Burling.
  • An old folk in The World's End provides Infodumps that help to unravel the town's dark secret.

Literature
  • Pet Sematary has the fatherly neighbor in this role, who runs squarely into the "kickstart the newbie's curiosity" problem when he tells him about the Indian burial ground. He is profoundly conflicted about whether to tell the main character anything at all, and it is implied that the spirit that haunts the ground may be influencing or manipulating him. Falls into What the Hell, Hero? territory when it's revealed that, while he initially presents it as spooky but ultimately harmless, he actually knows exactly how bad things can get when folks go messing around there.

Live-Action TV
  • American Horror Story: Murder House has various characters who know about the house's history, but only one (Tate Langdon) who out and out warns the house is haunted. Of course, he falls squarely into Cassandra Truth.
    • There is also the driving tour that goes by the house, but all they know is that it is the "Murder House" (which still puts them leagues ahead of the poor saps who buy the house).
  • The Headless Ghost, the Mandatory Twist Ending reveals that the old tour guide was a ghost all along or something).
  • In the creator/Stephen King mini-series Rose Red, Joyce Reardon is the researcher type of historian for the eponymous haunted house with assistance from Steve Rimbauer, a descendent of some of the haunting parties. Joyce is not particularly concerned about the safety of the group.

Music
  • In the Dream Theater concept album Metropolis Part 2: Scenes from a Memory. It comes from the song "Fatal Tragedy," where the protagonist Nicholas visits the house he sees in his dream. He meets an "older man," who tells him about the murder of a young woman in the house years before.

Western Animation
  • There's a Recurring Character parodying this in South Park (specifically, an Expy of the guy in Pet Sematary). He turns up now and again to warn people away from the Spooky Location du jour.
  • Mr. Burns serves this purpose in The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror V:
    Mr. Burns: This house has quite a long and colorful history. It was built on an ancient Indian burial ground, and was the setting of Satanic rituals, witch-burnings, and five John Denver Christmas specials.
    Homer: (Shudders) Ugh, John Denver!
  • One of these will appear early on in most episodes of Scooby-Doo. Quite often they're the ones behind the Scooby-Doo Hoax, but sometimes they genuinely believe in the Monster of the Week.

Video Games

Visual Novels
  • Kumasawa, the senior maid in Umineko no Naku Koro ni, knows the history and legends of the island dating back before it was called Rokkenjima. Because she's a known prankster and likes to embellish stories for extra creepiness, no one takes her warnings seriously.

Tomes of Prophecy and FateInformation DeskHuman Hard Drive
Haunted HeroineHorror TropesHaunted Technology
Hanging JudgeCharacters as DeviceHe Who Fights Monsters
Happy FlashbackExpositionHe Knows About Timed Hits

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