Germans Love David Hasselhoff: Western Animation


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    Real Life Examples 
  • Robotboy seems to have a small but impressive cult following in Japan, considering it's "Blue Japanese-American-themed" titular Robot character rarity.
    • You can find the actual Region 2 French-Language DVD sets (Especially Volume 1) only on Ebay from France or Ebay France.
    • This show still airs in The United Kingdom, Eastern Europe, and Germany in the present time.
    • This show has a surprisingly high number of fans in North America and Asia, which begs the question why this show is no longer shown there after 2008.
  • Winx Club from Italy appears to have has a small but impressive cult following in Japan, considering it's "Fairy-themed" Magical Girl rarity, and also fanart from that country.
  • Anything related to Walt Disney is big in Japan. No exceptions. This has lead to Square Enix making the Kingdom Hearts series.
    • Frozen deserves special mention, since it's become the third highest grossing movie of all time in the country (only Spirited Away and Titanic are higher) and the highest-grossing Western Animation film there, leading the box office for a whopping 16 weeks in a row.
  • Captain Planet and the Planeteers is adored almost totally unironically in Australia, Brazil, and other countries. In America, it's either hated for being preachy or tolerated due to Bile Fascination.
    • Season 6 was not even aired in the U.S. until 2006, ten years after its premiere airing overseas.
    • It used to be popular in America prior to the massive backlash against environmentalism that continues to this day (much to the consternation of every other country on earth).
  • American Dad! is more popular in France than Family Guy, which came first. The fact that the French channel NRJ 12 airs 8 episodes each Sunday helps a lot. Except for a few airings in Canal + on the early 2000's, Family Guy isn't aired anymore.
  • Caillou is, for reasons unknown, extremely popular in Turkey. The primary broadcaster of the show, Yumurcak TV, airs a one-hour two-episode back-to-back slot of the show at 7AM, and up to 3 additional half-hour slots through the day, seven days a week. Commercials for Caillou merchandise can last up to 5 minutes, and the toys are abundant in the country.
    • Not a nation, per se, but the series also seems to be especially popular with the black community in its native Canada despite the main character being white.
  • Thomas the Tank Engine is so popular in Japan that not only did they get merchandise that isn't available in other countries, they got a theme park in Mt Fuji.
  • The Magic Adventures Of Mumfie, Britt Allcroft's other major production, is very popular in Norway. There are many Norwegian pages about the show on the internet. The Ladybird books from the UK even got translated there. It was also the first country to get the show on DVD.
    • Mumfie's also more popular in the US than the UK. They got the entire Mumfie's Quest arc and series first on VHS and Hulu, respectively, and the White Christmas special was the highest-rated program in it's timeslot.
    • It too was popular in Japan-the first video of the series was the third-top selling anime video when it came out, and its soundtrack was the fifth-top selling anime CD of the week in Japan. Despite this, the episodes after Mumfie's Quest weren't dubbed. note 
    • According to Britt Allcroft, the show was very popular in Germany as well, gaining high ratings in its' timeslot and lots of praise. They also released a CD and the first 15 episodes on VHS.
    • There are also many Spanish fans of the show.
  • Kim Possible is huge in Germany. Fans (and networks) on that side of the globe staged a hissy fit that persuaded Disney to renew the series, making it the first Disney cartoon since Ducktales to break the 65-Episode Curse. Germany is also the only country where the full series is available on DVD.
  • From All of Us to All of You, a Disney Christmas compilation special that first aired on Walt Disney Presents in 1958, hasn't been seen on U.S. network TV in decades, but in Sweden (where it goes by the name Kalle Anka, Donald Duck's Swedish name), it's obligatory Christmas Eve viewing, drawing the kind of ratings that Super Bowls would get in America.
    • Making it even odder is that the one Donald short featured in the special, "Clown of the Jungle", takes place in South America and has absolutely nothing to do with Christmas.
      • Donald does appear three more times during the special. He's part of the short "Mickey's Trailer", along with Mickey Mouse and Goofy, and he also appears in passing in two Christmas-related segments. But yeah, Jiminy Cricket is the real star of the special. But since Donald is the most famous Disney character here in Sweden, I guess it only made sense to name it after him instead.
    • While considered a classic by many, the Academy Award winning short Ferdinand The Bull is starting to fade into obscurity in America as it hasn't been aired for a very long time. In Sweden, it's part of the tradition to air Ferdinand every Christmas Eve alongside From All of Us to All of You. In 1982, Swedish Television were going to cancel Ferdinand, but public protests caused the film to remain.
  • The Simpsons:
    • As popular as the show is in the United States (where it's considered one of the greatest TV shows of all time), it's even more popular in the United Kingdom and Ireland. An area themed to Springfield was actually built in the Universal Studios Orlando theme park as a way to help absorb the influx of British guests who were coming to the resort to see the new Harry Potter area.
    • Lisa Simpson is apparently the most popular main cast member in Japan. Considering that she's a studious and intelligent Buddhist, this isn't too surprising. In America, Lisa is either tolerated or branded one of the reasons why this popular sitcom sucks (at least in the later episodes, where Lisa becomes a preachy vegetarian and nearly every episode about her is about her protesting something. The earlier episodes, she was smart and artistic, but still had childlike interests, like ponies, princesses, and cartoons, like The Happy Little Elves and The Itchy and Scratchy Show).
    • Also the show is extremely popular in Spain, to near-religious levels (like how The Simpsons was back in the 1990s in America).
    • In Argentina the WHOLE Sunday program block of a TV broadcast network from noon to 5 is Simpsons re-runs, and with fairly good ratings too. Also there, The Simpsons Movie was the highest-grossing film of 2007.
    • The Simpsons is regarded more fondly in French Canada than many other American franchises are, partly due to its local dubbing having the characters speak in informal "joual" accentsnote  used by most Francophone Quebequois in everyday life and actually pulling it off wellnote .
    • Matt Groening has said that Australia might be the country most obsessed with the show. It was enormous there during the "classic" era.
      • Most episodes where the eponymous family visit another country fall under Americans Hate Tingle, but the episode where they go to Australia is often cited as a favorite episode by Australian fans.
  • The low-budget Canadian cartoon Kevin Spencer is surprisingly popular in Spanish-speaking countries, to the point where you can find more Spanish dubs on YouTube than the original English versions.
  • Transformers:
    • Being an International Coproduction, it's far more popular in America than in Japan, despite the robot designs being Japanese, while the names and story were made in America. This may be because the Japanese see sentient robots without pilots as "kiddy" (and the franchise is marketed to small children in Japan). Indeed, Japanese-only series tend to feature people piloting the Transformers (Transformers Headmasters and Kiss Players). It's also very popular in China, due to the first generation (heh, gen-1) of children born under the "One-Child Policy" watching television on a massive scale. The people who watched the 2007 movie weren't children, but adults who watched as children back in the 1990s.
    • Michael Bay mentions in the DVD Commentary that when he screened the movie for Japanese producers, they went "Oooh". He doesn't mention this (and may not know), but considering that Transformers is mostly marketed to children in Japan, seeing the edgier movie may have been somewhat of a shock.
    • On a character level, Ultra Magnus. In the American fandom, his largest exposure was as the wishy-washy loser in Transformers: The Movie, an image that the current comics are currently trying to shake off. In the UK, though, he's best remembered as the major-league badass who went toe-to-toe with Galvatron in Target: 2006. Nightbeat, Thunderwing, Xaaron, and Straxus have a similar disparity, with far more exposure in the UK comic than in the US.
    • Star Saber, of Transformers Victory fame, is absolutely beloved in Japan. In a poll of Autobot leaders, he outdid Optimus Primal and multiple incarnations of Prime himself, and he's gotten himself multiple original figures and homage designs. In the West, Star Saber has a decidedly niche following at best, and he's often thought of as bland (though few will deny he looks cool). Nationalist sentiment likely ties into it; Star Saber was the first Autobot leader to be completely Japan-original.
  • The Amazing World of Gumball is very popular in Japan thanks to its cuteness and overall weirdness. It's even beaten Tom and Jerry in terms of popularity in Cartoon Network Japan.
  • Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi:
    • An Americanization of Japanese pop stars has a Spanish dub that is incredibly popular. In fact it is easier to find online videos of the Spanish dub than of the English or Japanese versions. And the Japanese consider those two singers foreigners for all intents and purposes, strengthening this example of the trope.
    • Andy Sturmer achieved greater commercial success as a songwriter for Puffy than as a member of Jellyfish.
  • Extreme Ghostbusters:
    • It has enough popularity in Europe that it has a few video game adaptations.
    • It became incredibly popular in Puerto Rico when it premièred during the block of cartoons shown between 3:00 and 5:00 in the afternoon, and you could practically listen to children in cars after being picked up from school frantically begging their parents to get home quick so they wouldn't miss that day's episode. It was so popular that it was one of few cartoons to enjoy an entire run of all its episodes, as local Puerto Rican TV channels were somewhat notorious for taking animated series off the air before all episodes were shown.
  • The Hanna-Barbera cartoon Wacky Races:
    • It is apparently popular in Japan, with some anime series making reference to or parodying the show. Wacky Races is apparently also popular in the United Kingdom, judging from Google searching turning up various British sites making use of the term "wacky races" or referencing the cartoon itself... then there's this.
    • One of the classic SD Gundam cartoons is an out-and-out parody of Wacky Races, with Gundam ZZ villains Yazan and Gemon playing the roles of Dick Dastardly and Muttley; unfortunately this meant that for copyright reasons this one had to be left out of re-releases.
      • Rumor has it that the Mario Kart series was inspired by Wacky Races.
  • Strawberry Shortcake. Big in the US, humongous in Latin America, Europe, South Africa and South-East Asia. It's so huge in these areas that in Europe, there are actually additional games for the franchise released that are unreleased in the US. In Latin America, words introduced by the series entered mainstream usage, and they even created a live action extension to the cartoon series. And in these countries, the 2003/2007 cartoons are aired several times a day, and special episodes are aired as two parters. In the US, the 2003 specials episodes are edited into a single 30 minute episode, throwing out many subplots of the show, and the 2007 cartoons have yet to air in the US, releasing only direct-to-DVD releases. And oh, in The Philippines and South Africa, episodes that have yet to be released on DVDs in the US are already released over there.
  • Ovide and the Gang:
    • Ovide is considered somewhat of a cult classic in the Netherlands. May have something to do with the thoroughly Woolseyed theme song.
    • They even made a feature length movie in Mexico. Extra effort was put into making the voice acting as similar to the original dubbing as possible (which is part of what made it so successful in the first place).
  • There was a time when Russian dubs of Disney series were very good
    • DuckTales, TaleSpin and Aladdin were done nicely, but Darkwing Duck was incredibly awesome, extremely popular and a subject for Memetic Mutation lasting ever now. Everybody who grew up in the 90s knows the intro song by heart. In addition, it introduced a whole generation to superhero tropes due to "Weird Al" Effect.
    • Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers also enjoys a large fandom in Russia. However, even more amazing is the obsession directed at a single character from it. The Russian fandom of Gadget Hackwrench is really something not from this world. There are still quite a few pages with obsessive love letters directed to her, graffiti on walls and decals on cars (examples), and even a church dedicated to her.
  • Galaxy Rangers may have been written and voiced in America, and animated by Tokyo Movie Shinsha, but it appeared to be more popular in Latin America, the UK, and especially Germany. Germany got the entire series on DVD in the late 90's, while American fans had to wait until 2008! Notably, many of the Fan Fic writers are bilingual as a result.
  • My Life as a Teenage Robot:
  • ChalkZone was also one of the most popular Nicktoons in Japan.
  • In Brazil, Dungeons & Dragons was really big. During the 2000s, movie magazine got so fed up with questions about a film adaptation that it once replied "It was only popular here!" It's still being aired in The New Tens, and there's even a bunch of urban legends about the non-existent last episode.
  • KaBlam!:
    • It was rather popular in Nick's Japan branch, premiering in 1998 (dubbed in Japanese) when Nick Japan was launched, and finally getting cancelled around 2007-2008. (Please note that the show was put in reruns by then).
    • It's also very popular in Latin American markets as well.
    • And it's pretty popular over in the Netherlands. Similar to most anime, the dubbed version of the show which was syndicated (Nickelodeon wasn't available over there yet) was disliked by some fans who have heard the original English voices (almost all the characters (June mostly) sound completely different in the Dutch dub), so when the show was brought over to Nicktoons (in their branch), it was subtitled in Dutch with the English audio.
    • Action League Now is the most popular short in the US. Life With Loopy is the most popular short in Russia.
  • Top Cat
    • Top Cat was only a modest success in the United States, where it ran for a mere 30 episodes and is relatively obscure to modern audiences (unless you're a classic cartoon historian/fan, like Jerry Beck, John Kricfalusi, or Leonard Maltin). In Latin America, it's Hanna-Barbera's biggest franchise, rivaling only The Flintstones in its success and still regularly rerun to this day. It is so popular that Officer Dibble's name, dubbed as Oficial Matute, became slang in several Latin American countries for "police officer". It is even so popular that in 2011, Warner Bros. (who now owns the franchise after taking over Hanna-Barbera) licensed out the property to Anima Studios of Mexico to create a Top Cat animated feature specifically targeted at the Latin American fanbase. The ticket sales in Mexico alone paid for the film and it's the fifth highest grossing Mexican-produced film of all time.
      • The show's popularity owe so much to the Woolseyism used in the dub. Each character name was changed to a typical latin amercan name and each cat were given distinctive and different Mexican accents. Considering that Mexican media is very popular in most latin american countries, people everywhere were familiar with those changes.
    • Top Cat also found a large audience in the UK (though, in the UK, the show was called Boss Cat when it was first shown to avoid associating it with a brand of cat food known as Top Cat - it's now shown under its own name). In fact, the only reason an English language dub of the 2011 film was produced was to release the movie in the UK. Much like in Latin America, "The Dibble" is slang in some parts of England for police officers and more recently, a politician who included the initials "T.C." in his name was referred to by his opponents as "Top Cat" to mock him.
  • Ultimate Book of Spells was huge in the UK. It was on every weekday afternoon was repeated every weekday morning on CBBC, and now is being repeated on Pop. The videos were on major store shelves too.
  • Chowder for the UK. To compare, both it and Flapjack made their UK debut around the same time, and while Chowder has gone from one or two episodes a day to being aired several times morning, noon and night, Flapjack has all but vanished, with yet to air anything outside of season one.
  • Spongebob Squarepants
  • The Canadian cartoon What's with Andy? was huge in Poland. The success was so immense, Disney XD (which acquired the rights to the cartoon after merging with the European network Jetix [previously Fox Kids]) decided to start rerunning the series along with Totally Spies! recently.
  • From 1999-2002, Cartoon Network banned Speedy Gonzales cartoons from airing on the network because the executives deemed him to be an Ethnic Scrappy. Despite the heavy stereotypes, Speedy Gonzales was incredibly popular with Latin American Audiences, with Mexico even having a Speedy Gonzales show. Eventually the ban was lifted. Of course, by that time, Cartoon Network was phasing out its Looney Tunes shorts for more original programming (some of which was live-action, which totally goes against the name of a channel known as Cartoon Network).
  • Recess was one of the most popular Disney shows in Germany. The show is very popular in Canada, to the point where it still airs on Family, the Expy of The Disney Channel. The show is pretty popular in the U.K. too, and Japan. Butch, Hustler Kid, and Lawson are extremely popular over there, and T.J. is considered as the show's Moe symbol.
  • While Ren and Stimpy Adult Party Cartoon wasn't too popular in the U.S., the Short Runner does have some strong fanbases in Eastern Europe (mostly in Poland).
  • While 4kids version of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles enjoyed moderate success in the States it seems to have a pretty sizable following in Latin America
  • Tom and Jerry: Universally popular due to its almost total lack of dialogue, which makes it far more easy to broadcast untranslated than other cartoons.
    • It is quite popular in Japan. It's beaten other animated series, even classic anime, in various popularity lists and some of the rarer shorts not even accessible in America are common place there.
    • The cartoons have a cult status in the Czech Republic and they are fondly remembered. New generations of children keep discovering them and it's definitely the country's archetype of the Road Runner Vs. Wile E. Coyote cartoons.
    • In the United Kingdom they are almost "the" definition of a classic quality cartoon. For decades the BBC programmed "Tom & Jerry" on TV, especially when technical difficulties occured and they had to broadcast something of general interest to keep their audience watching (like how, in 1993, Noel's House Party had to be taken off-air due to a bomb threat from the IRA, and BBC 1 had to put on Tom & Jerry instead). In the "100 Best Cartoons" list, held by Channel 4 in 2005, Tom & Jerry came in second, only behind The Simpsons.
  • Ben 10:
    • Gwen is a rather divisive character in the West, but she is incredibly popular in Southeast Asia; so much that the Cartoon Network branch there has given her a product line and even her own official website!
    • Heck, the franchise's various shows and TV movies airs around 10 times a day on SEA CN feeds. And the only other things on the SEA CN feeds are old Hanna-Barbera cartoons, the rare CN original that is most likely out of date by the time it aired, and the occasional Tom and Jerry wannabe called Oggy and the Cockroaches (which for some reason also airs on Disney Channel Asia). All the other newer CN originals and highly-desired shows that airs on CN in the US are designated to sister channels Toonami and Cartoonito in the region instead. I think this says a lot about how much most Asians adore Ben 10...
    • The series itself is quite popular in Japan. This isn't too surprising, as it draws a lot of influence from Anime and Tokusatsu.
    • According to That Dude in the Suede, it gained quite the following in New Zealand.
    • It was a MASSIVE insane hit in South America and might as well be in all Latin America. Notable countries include Argentina, Paraguay (South) and Mexico (North).
  • South Park has a rather well-sized fanbase in Japan, it's one of the stand-out western animations there. Might have something to do with the cute characters and overall American weirdness. And that the Japanese are fans of Toilet Humor. This also explains all the anime-style fan art you see on fan art sites.
  • While Godzilla: The Series is popular in America, where many fans of the Japanese Godzilla films know it's better than its originating film, many Japanese fans consider it even superior to some of their own films. Also, in Serbia, where Godzilla as a franchise tanks horribly on a regular basis, the series was popular enough to become one of only four American cartoons in history to be given a Serbian language dub. Particularly notable was that the entire series was given this, which had only happened once before. Ever.
  • The Powerpuff Girls is also popular in Japan. So much so, in fact, that they made their own version of the series.
  • Lilo & Stitch was also very popular in Japan, with an anime version that lasted 4 seasons, very unusual for an anime series.
    • Stitch toys are still quite common in Japanese shops.
  • Happy Tree Friends also has a well-sized fanbase in Japan, if the amount of fanarts in Pixiv is any indication. They run further with that, creating Moe Anthropomorphism of the poor critters, which inevitably resulted in slash. It must be seen to be believed. Or better yet, don't.
  • Family Guy is more popular in the United Kingdom than in America. In America, the show is very firmly Love It or Hate It: it's either loved for being a new edgier version of The Simpsons, or hated because (a) the jokes and stories are either too dark or too gross; (b) the jokes are meaningless, interchangeable, and superfluous; or (c) the premise of a dysfunctional family having wacky adventures in a fictional town has been done before and done better by other shows (The Simpsons, King of the Hill, Wait Till Your Father Gets Home). So Seth Mac Farlane is therefore a marginally-talented hack who got lucky because TV producers wouldn't know originality if it bit them. In Britain, where Gallows Humor and the kind of "random" Monty Python-esque humor is better appreciated, this show is loved no matter what (except for the occasional bad episode). Even the UK aired an episode that America didn't ("Partial Terms of Endearment") because abortion isn't as hot-button an issue in the UK as it is in America.
  • The Fairly Oddparents has been pretty screwed over by the U.S. Nickelodeon department, but the cartoon has a larger fanbase in the U.K. and Latin America.
  • Team Galaxy was a dual effort between Marathon Media and Canada's Ocean Group studio, with Canada's YTV and France's Channel 3 airing it. It was a critical failure on the United States's Cartoon Network as the audience had deemed it "Totally Spies in space" despite building a new lineup to feature it and also having it part of their then-new online streaming service, but the show is extremely popular in the Philippines, where reruns still air.
  • Ruby Gloom is very popular in Japan.
  • Tiny Toon Adventures:
    • It is surprisingly popular in Russia and Japan. Not a coincidence in Japan's case. All seven Tiny Toon video games released during the '90s were made by Konami and the more recent Tiny Toon Adventures: Buster's Bad Dream/Scary Dreams and the never-released Tiny Toons: Defenders of the Universe were made by Treasure.
  • Cartoon Network is immensely popular in Poland. Most of this success is thanks to it being the first 100%-children's network getting launched in this country. Nickelodeon, on the other hand, is still down in the sewers in comparison.
  • Betty Boop was pretty popular in Japan in her heydays; she even got a special specifically made for Japanese audiences, "A Language All My Own" where Betty sings in Japanese.
  • The animated Curious George, takes this Up to Eleven, while moderately well-known in the United States, the cartoon is so popular in Japan, that it often makes the Top 10 TV Animation Lists each week, in a list which has been mainly domestic animation after Lilo & Stitch aired about half a decade ago.
  • Tintin is famous in Brazil, where it's considered part of the childhood of anyone who lived in the 90's, when its broadcaster, TV Cultura, lived a golden age (in contrast with today's decadence). They were thrilled that the original voice actors of the dub would be reprising their roles in the 2011 film.
  • While the otherwise well-received Hercules fell victim to the opposite trope in Greece, the Chinese loved Mulan.
  • Kung Fu Panda was a massive hit in China. So much so there was a council meeting where the officials of the nation chided their own people for not doing something of the same detail.
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic:
    • The Japanese fandom loves Fluttershy who has a number of similarities with the Japanese archetype of Yamato Nadeshiko (American fans referred to her as "the moe pony" from the beginning). There's even a meme calling her "an honorary Japanese".
      • Applejack is by far the least popular main character in the United States, both in its main audience and its Periphery Demographic, to where she's the only main character excluded from marketing and some toy lines. However, Applejack consistently places in the top 3 in Japanese popularity polls. This is most likely a combination of her work ethic resonating with the importance Japanese culture places on hard work and a general Japanese love of Westerns and cowboys.
      • As it seems, Cheerilee also has a sizeable number of Japanese fans, to where she was given top billing in the Japanese dub. This is most certainly due to her role as the Sensei-chan.
    • The series as a whole is gaining a bit of ground in Japan, as seen here. It must be the cuteness and female archetypes similar to that of Shoujo anime.
    • It has a Japanese dub with fairly big-name voice actors. It also has mostly different opening and credits sequences with J-pop, decent lip-synching, and even an occasional miniature Variety Show segment near the end. There is so much effort put into it that if, for some reason, you had never heard of My Little Pony before, you could easily mistake it for a Japanese production with particularly smooth animation. That is how much faith the Japanese crew have in the show. As it turns out, it's not faring as well with its intended demographic of little girls as intended; its popularity in Japan, rather, lies in the adult male fans like in the western world. Nevertheless, such an undertaking could not have been done without having witnessed prior Japanese success (albeit misaimed).
    • It's also very popular in Poland, as indicated by the fact that if you look on Mini Mini+'s website, it's the first show to be listed. It also has a very well done Polish dub despite some hiccups. In fact, it's so popular there that they even have their own Equestria Daily!
  • Kidd Video, for whatever reason, proved to be really popular in Israel; getting a whole line of merchandise that wasn't released in America; including a soundtrack album of the show's music that never was available to Americans until it was put up in MP3 format on The Flipside, a Kidd Video fan site.
  • Tweety of Looney Tunes is pretty popular in Japan. He even has a few volumes of DVDs titled "I Love Tweety" sold there. Japan's fondness for small, adorable creatures probably helped him out a lot.
  • The Flintstones:
    • The show was widely popular in Quebec, probably for its high quality dubbing in local French accent.
    • Its dubbing also reached legendary levels in Hungary due to the cleverly-written, rhyming dialog and the voice cast. In fact, it was so well received that it influenced many later cartoon dubs.
  • The U.S. Acres/Orson's Farm segments of Garfield and Friends are more popular in Spanish-speaking countries, where it is called "La Granja De Orson". The English version of the U.S. Acres segment "Secrets of The Animated Cartoon" had 8,400 views on YouTube, while the Spanish version of the episode "Who Done It?" had 68,291 views.
    • U.S. Acres is also popular in the United Kingdom, to the point where you can find more British merchandise than American ones up for sale.
  • Mickey Mouse Clubhouse is very popular in Spanish-speaking countries, due to there being lots of merchandise for the show.
  • Shaun the Sheep, like the Curious George entry above, is so popular in Japan that it sometimes makes the weekly top 10 anime list as well.
  • The Czech audience has a special love for Adventures of the Gummi Bears. The translation was of extraordinary quality and full of intelligent and hilarious word play. The cast of voice actors was made of awesome as some of them were really famous Czech star actors. The catchy theme song was recorded by a well-known singer. The animation is gorgeous and the stories are fun and clever. What's not to love? Fans, now grown up people, keep arguing whether Cubbi's Czech name is Bida (it's a variation of a common nickname for bears) or Pida (it's an affectionate pet name for cute and little things). All the Gummi Bears' names start with a "B" which resolves the conflict but fandom is a Serious Business and it's hard for some to give up childhood memories.
  • Superjail!, when it's not oogled over by Americans, is also pretty popular in South America, Asia, Europe, and even Australia. However, it is most notable for having a huge Asian, mostly South Korean and Japanese, fanbase that likes drawing Animesque fanart for the show. The Superjail! Anthology doujinshi was even produced by a number of artists and sent to Titmouse Inc., where it sits for people to thumb through (Christy Karacas approved of the project and contributed his own "Thank you!" illustration in its contents).
  • Daria has a sizable fanbase in Argentina of all places. Possibly because she's basically an older version of Mafalda.
  • Woody Woodpecker is fairly popular in South America, where all his incarnations still air. Brazilian TV Record even has become infamous for having the toons frequently in their programming, as the sole feature of their children's block, and particularly before the night news (it got worse as the Woody Woodpecker reruns aired after - and at times instead of - their 2012 Olympic Games coverage).
  • While Midnight Patrol: Adventures in the Dream Zone was cancelled after only one season, in the UK it stayed on TV for several years through repeats with only 13 episodes. It also got a UK-exclusive computer game and comic.
  • Miffy appears to be popular in Japan, even getting its' own magazine.
  • Peppa Pig's popularity in Italy boomed up in 2012 and keeps creeping around the nation.
  • The Adventures of Teddy Ruxpin was the first western cartoon ever shown in Bulgaria. Due to this fact, it's very popular there. There is even a music shop called MAVO in Bulgaria.
    • It's also popular in France as well, but not as extreme as in Bulgaria.
  • The Magic Roundabout is the hugely popular British localisation of a French Stop Motion show called Le Manège Enchanté. The French show is now largely forgotten in its native land. It should be noted that the popularity of The Magic Roundabout was largely due to the quality of its extreme Cut-and-Paste Translation, which was written and narrated by Eric Thompson based purely on the visuals with no reference to the French script.
  • El Tigre is more popular in Asia than in America-the show airs more than SpongeBob does there!
  • Codename: Kids Next Door has a small yet impressive cult following in Japan, judging by all the fanart from that country.
  • Avatar: The Last Airbender was (and still is) a beloved smash hit in Latin America, thanks to the Chilean Superlative Dubbing. In particular, Ibope Paraguay lists it as THE highest rated show for its network in that country.
  • Total Drama is a Canadian cartoon that's incredibly popular among Americans (mostly the first season), to the point that a lot of American fans thought the show was from the US until they were told otherwise.
  • Davethe Barbarian got Screwedbythe Network in the US, but it had a bit more success in the UK, getting regular airings on CITV.

     In-Universe Examples 
  • In the DCAU, Supergirl has considerable popularity in Japan. So popular that a chubby little fangirl kicked Stargirl in the shin for badmouthing about Supergirl.
  • The Simpsons. Lisa Simpson has a ridiculously detailed plan for being a famous jazz musician one day, which includes being ignored in her own country but very popular in France.
  • In the South Park episode "Jakovasaurs", the eponymous animals are forcibly relocated to France when the people of South Park find them too annoying to live, where the French find them to be hilarious and "just like Jerry Lewis!"
  • Subverted in Total Drama World Tour. Chris tells the contestants that they are huge in Japan, but their voices are dubbed over in English and that the show is subtitled in Japanese, because they think their normal voices are just too annoying.
    • The series has yet to be dubbed in Japanese.
  • In Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes, at one point Johnny comments "That's it, I'm moving to Japan. They love me in Japan."
  • Histeria invokes this trope in its theme song with the line "They love it in Bulgaria."
  • In the Animaniacs episode "Clown and Out", the Jerry Lewis-like Non-Ironic Clown tries to entertain Wakko on his birthday, but the Warners reject him rather violently, claiming that Wakko has coulrophobia (or, as they put it, 'clownophobia'). By the end of the episode, the clown is sent to Mars on a rocket, and finds that the Martian children love him.
  • Within Bonkers episode, "Tokyo Bonkers", Bonkers finds that his former show is still highly considered in Japan, and he becomes a local celebrity. He's even considered quitting the force to return to stardom.
  • An episode of Rocko's Modern Life had Rocko and Heffer visiting Paris, France. Their tour group stops for lunch at an "authentic French cuisine" restaurant, which turns out to be a Chokey Chicken (likely parodying the real life international popularity of American fast food chains such as KFC and McDonald's). Towards the end of the episode, Heffer looks back on pictures he took of famous Parisian attractions (i.e, the Eiffel Tower, Louvre, and Arc de Triomphe), all of which have Chokey Chicken restaurants installed in them.