Characters / Star Trek III: The Search for Spock

For characters who debuted in Star Trek: The Original Series, see Characters.Star Trek The Original Series

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Starfleet Personnel

    Admiral Harry Morrow 
Played by: Robert Hooks

A cautious and skeptical Starfleet admiral.

  • Obstructive Bureaucrat: Granted, the situation around the Genesis Planet was undoubtedly a very difficult one from a political standpoint, but he point-blank refuses to help Kirk out in any way after being asked to help retrieve Spock's body. On the other hand, he at least seems genuinely concerned for Kirk, rather than just being obstructive for the sake of it.


    Commander Kruge 

The commanding officer of a Klingon Bird-of-Prey who is determined to steal the secret of Genesis.

  • Bad Boss: With a side of Even Evil Has Standards, though. He executes his original gunner for "accidentally" destroying the Grissom, though seems rather disgusted that the gunner showed no remorse in blowing up a defenceless science vessel.
  • Beard of Evil: Sports a Fu Manchu mustache and beard.
  • Blood Knight: Kruge was basically the prototype for the TNG-era "WAAAGH!" style of Klingons.
  • Disney Villain Death: A variation, as we do see his body explode into a fireball when he lands in a lava pit.
  • Leeroy Jenkins: He starts a firefight against a battle cruiser-level starship that outguns him 10-to-1 using his cloaking device and the element of surprise (while still expecting to lose the fight), then when instead the captain starts negotiating with him, he realizes there is something seriously wrong with the ship and sends over half his crew as a boarding party to take control.
  • Noble Demon: Is outraged after his gunner disregards his order to cripple a presumably unarmed science vessel and opts to destroy it outright, showing no remorse in doing so: Kruge calls him an 'animal' after vaporizing him. Later, he's shown in a Villainous B.S.O.D. when he realized he sent his crew into a trap.
    • Him executing the gunner is expanded on in the Novelization, wherein he attempts to give the gunner an honorable death by ordering him to commit suicide, but the guy refuses, leading to Kruge shooting him.
  • Not Afraid to Die: Kruge finds the prospect of fighting Starfleet's greatest hero captain on an exploding planet to be exhilarating. He's not purposefully trying to die, but such a death would be considered the most glorious end a Klingon could wish for.
  • Samurai Ponytail: He has one, reinforcing the samurai elements of Klingon culture.
  • Taking You with Me: Tries to drag Kirk down into a firey chasm, and before that he seemed quite happy with the possibility of dying with the Genesis Planet if Kirk wouldn't give him the info he wanted.

Played by: Stephen Liska

One of Kruge's officers.

  • Beleaguered Assistant: Nearly gets vaporized by Kruge in the aftermath of the Bird-of-Prey's first gunner getting blown to shreds, after Torg attempts to reveal the existence of David, Saavik and Spock on the Genesis Planet.
  • The Dragon: Appears to be Kruge's second in command.
  • Fatal Flaw: If only he understood Arabic numbers, he might have been able to call for a beam-out in time. Unless he was just Too Dumb to Live.

Played by: John Larroquete

One of Kruge's officers.

  • Death Seeker: The film leaves it ambiguous as to whether he actually wants to die after the rest of his crew is killed, or whether he's just annoyed that Kirk is screwing with him. The novelization of the film makes it more explicit, and he commits suicide before the captured ship reaches Vulcan.
  • Sole Survivor: The only surviving member of the Bird-of-Prey crew, most of whom get blown up with the Enterprise, and the remainder of whom are killed down on the Genesis Planet.
  • Taking You with Me: Refuses to help the Enterprise crew fly the captured Bird-of-Prey to safety, likely happy in the knowledge that they'll all die when the Genesis Planet goes boom. Fortunately, Scotty and Sulu work out how to fly it anyway.
  • What Could Have Been: Maltz was going to return during the trial of Kirk and McCoy in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country; he was going to testify about their actions in stealing the Klingon scout ship. Laroquette was unavailable at the time of filming so the scene wasn't done.

Played by: Cathie Shirriff

A Klingon spy working for Kruge.

  • Disposable Woman: Subverted, as it's Kruge himself who disposes of her, though their exact relationship is somewhat ambiguous.
  • Face Death with Dignity: She reacts to the news of her impending demise with a relatively calm "Understood."
  • She Knows Too Much: She, and the crew of the freighter she's on, get blown to shreds after she reveals that she looked at the Project Genesis briefing.

    Klingon Sergeant 
Played by: David Cadiente

A Klingon warrior serving under Kruge.

  • Dull Surprise: His reaction to almost everything, from Kruge killing the giant worm creature to the shocking sight of the teenage Spock rapidly aging into an adult.
  • Mook Lieutenant: being a Klingon non-com and all.
  • No Name Given: Not even in the novelization.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: He is the one who murders David.
  • Spell My Name with an "S": Well, his rank, anyway; in the film credits he's "Klingon Sargeant," while in the novelization he's a "serjeant." Both are acceptable variations of "sergeant," though.

    Klingon Gunner 
Played by: Bob K. Cummings

The (first) gunner aboard the Klingon Bird-of-Prey.

  • Beleaguered Assistant: Even before Kruge kills him, he's the one with the unpleasant task of feeding his leader's ferocious pet dog monster.
  • No Name Given: Like the sergeant, he isn't named in any media.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: It is his destruction of the Grissom which forces the Klingons to search for hostages down on Genesis.
  • You Have Failed Me: With a side of Even Evil Has Standards; when he "accidentally" blows up the Grissom after being told to simply cripple her, and then compounds his mistake by insisting it was a "lucky shot," Kruge shoots him.
    • In the novelization, Kruge tries to make him commit suicide to atone for his failure, but he refuses, which is what prompts Kruge to finally just kill him.