Follow TV Tropes

Following

Characters / Ghost Recon

Go To

This page is very much a work in progress, contributions are welcomed. Characters from Ghost Recon Wildlands are on their own page.

    open/close all folders 

    Ghost Recon 

The Ghosts (Specialists)

Will Jacobs

Class: Rifleman
A Special Forces Captain who was assigned to the Ghosts in 2001. He retired as a major after the game, appearing once again as a TV show host in the Xbox version of Ghost Recon 2.

Leah "Lindy" Cohen

Class: Rifleman
A 10th Infantry Regiment (later Special Forces) sergeant who was transferred to the Ghosts in 2005.
  • Action Girl
  • Boisterous Bruiser: Has apparently run herself out of ammunition on several occasions due to "an excess of enthusiasm" in the field. Also had a "particular fondness" for unarmed combat and once put a martial arts instructor in the infirmary, earning her much respect from her peers.
  • Rare Guns: Uses the experimental OICW.
  • Sergeant Rock

Klaus Henkel

Class: Demolitions
A Bundeswehr demolitions specialist. Assigned to the Ghosts in 2003.
  • Demolitions Expert: Particularly pronounced in Island Thunder, where his kits are revamped to give him both a twelve-shot grenade launcher and the AT4.
  • Not Even Bothering with the Accent: Speaks with a random American-accented voice throughout the game like the rest of the Ghosts.

Harold "Buzz" Gordon

Class: Rifleman
An Army Ranger and one of the first Ghost operatives to join when it was formed in 1994. After the events of the game and the expansion packs, he becomes a Lieutenant Colonel, becoming part of the Ghost Command.

Scott Ibrahim

Class: Sniper
Another 10th Infantry Regiment-turned-Special Forces member, serving as a sniper. Assigned to the Ghosts in 2007.
  • The Artifact: His bio was apparently finalized before his actual in-game class and weapon selection was, since said bio insists he's just as accurate with the M136 as he is with small arms, despite the fact that he can't actually use the M136.
  • Friendly Sniper
  • New Meat: In a relative sense, as while he's been with general Special Forces for two years, he's the newest addition to the Ghosts.

Dieter Munz

Class: Support
A Bundeswehr machinegunner who also spent time with GSG-9, and has served with the Ghosts since 2006.
  • The Artifact: Like Ibrahim above, his bio also insists he specializes with the M136 and even keeps meticulous count of how many vehicles he's killed with them, despite him not being a Demolitions specialist who actually has access to it.
  • The Big Guy
  • Eloquent in My Native Tongue: His bio states that he's attempted to learn French several times, all of which "failed miserably".
  • More Dakka: His primary weapons are machine guns.
  • Not Even Bothering with the Accent: Speaks with a random American-accented voice throughout the game like the rest of the Ghosts.

Nigel Tunny

Class: Demolitions
A former British Army EOD specialist who joined the Special Air Service in 2001, then was attached to the Ghosts in 2005.

Jack Stone

Class: Sniper
Another British Army soldier/SAS operative, a sniper who has worked with the Ghosts since 2005.
  • Improbable Aiming Skills: He apparently scored the highest marks ever recorded on his initial marksmanship test.
  • Noodle Incident: He was sent as part of an advance force for a peacekeeping mission in Eritrea around November 2003, was captured by guerillas on the third, and escaped after killing them all on the sixth. He's not particularly keen on saying much about what exactly happened there.

Henry Ramirez

Class: Rifleman
A member of the 37th Armored Division who was also attached to the Colombian Joint Southern Task Force for a time, before joining the Ghosts in 2006.
  • Berserk Button: He doesn't like hearing jokes about short people, being disrespected in general, or being called "Hank".
  • I Have No Son!: Inverted, he doesn't get along very well with his step-father. He hasn't spoken to his family in four years.
  • Undying Loyalty: He has few friends among the other Ghosts, but the ones he does have, he's very close to.

Guram Osadze

Class: Support
A Georgian Army heavy gunner from 1991, attempts at increased cooperative effort between Georgia and the US saw him attached to the Ghosts since 2002.
  • Continuity Nod: A younger relative of his shows up as a member of a Georgian special forces team in Future Soldier, and he mentions Guram's service with the Ghosts, saying that he always spoke very highly of them.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: His bio states he absolutely loves American rap music.
  • Patriotic Fervor: His parents were instrumental in Georgia's transition from a Soviet satellite to an independent nation, and he in turn is extremely loyal to his country's freedom.
  • Wearing a Flag on Your Head: Taking a page from Guile, he apparently has a tattoo of the Georgian flag on his left bicep.

Astra Galinsky

Class: Sniper
A Lithuanian national champion shooter, her intended path has been currently cut short due to the incident with Russia, called up for active duty from the Lithuanian National Guard in 2007.
  • Action Girl
  • Cold Sniper: In any other cases she'd be more the friendly type, but with her parents having gone missing for over a month, she's not in the mood for it.

Susan Grey

Class: Rifleman
A member of the 513th Military Intelligence Brigade who joined Special Forces in 1999, and was assigned to the Ghosts in 2004.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: For a variety of reasons, she is apparently the single most-disliked member of the Ghosts.
  • Insufferable Genius: According to her bio on the old website, she has a "propensity for explaining to others exactly how skilled she is", and a tendency to correct inaccurate statements from other members of the group - even if she wasn't originally part of their conversation.
  • Submachine Guns: The only Rifleman specialist to use the MP5SD2.
  • The Leader: In the Endwar alternate continuity she becomes the leader of Ghost Recon after Mitchell is promoted to General and leader of the U.S. military.

Jodit Haile

Class: Rifleman
A member of the Eritrean Defense Force since 1999, returning to active service as hostilities flare up once again between Eritrea and Ethiopia, where she ends up working alongside the Ghosts.
  • Action Mom: She has a son who's, at the time of the current hostilities, about seven years old.
  • Teeth-Clenched Teamwork: She joined a rebel group around 2004 that ultimately succeeded in overthrowing the previous dictatorial government. Knowing that said government was sponsored by the US, she's not exactly happy to be accepting help from America or work with American forces, though the Ghosts eventually impress her with their professionalism.
  • Small Girl, Big Gun: Above-average height, but rather lanky in appearance and without any particularly visible muscle mass - so of course she's given the PKM, one of the biggest guns you can get in the game. This is especially pronounced in that the game classifies her as a Rifleman specialist, but gives her Support kits.

Antagonists

Dimitri Arbatov

President of the hardline Russian Democratic Union, who wishes to reestablish the Soviet Empire.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: He gets arrested and eventually executed by his own generals a little over halfway through the game as a scapegoat for the failure of the Russian invasion. Getting rid of said generals becomes the focus of the rest of the game.
  • The Ghost: President Arbatov is only mentioned in mission briefings, and never actually appears in the game itself. You never even ever see what he looks like.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: Of the original Ghost Recon game. He's the leader of the new hardline government responsible for the invasion of the Baltics, but is only mentioned in mission briefings and never seen or interacted with at all.
  • Our Presidents Are Different: President Evil. Becomes President Failure late in the game, betrayed and executed by his own troops.

Tesfaye Wolde

An Ethiopian colonel and warlord who overthrows the Ethiopian government using weapons purchased from President Arbitov's hardline Russian government, so he can start another war with Eritrea. He's ultimately defeated, and is either killed in action or captured along with the rest of his troops at the end of the game.
  • Beard of Evil: As seen in the cutscenes from the console version of the game.
  • Big Bad: Of the Desert Siege expansion pack.
  • Colonel Ripper
  • Frontline General/Villainous Valor: In the final mission, after the Ghosts have dismantled the rest of his military apparatus, he personally leads a tank column out against you in a last-ditch effort to rally his remaining followers. Your Mission Control states this move might be tactically questionable, but it shows the Colonel undeniably has balls.

Ashenafi Abate

An Ethiopian warlord and a friend of Wolde. Captured by the Ghosts late in the game.

Ariel Priego

The leader of the anti-American Cuban political party FDG. He was also captured along with the rest of his troops at the end of the game.
Advertisement:

    Ghost Recon 2 

The Ghosts

Scott Mitchell

The protagonist of Ghost Recon 2 and the Advanced Warfighter series. A career special forces soldier from a blue-collar background, he has served with the Ghosts in Georgia, Eritrea, and Cuba, and rose to the rank of Captain just in time to serve as the primary Ghost team leader during the two Korean conflicts of 2007 and 2011, as well as the Mexican uprising of 2013. By 2019, he's been promoted to Colonel and serves as the commanding officer of the Ghosts.
  • Badass Baritone: In the games in which he's the player character (Ghost Recon 2 and the two Advanced Warfighter games) he's got a fairly normal voice with a slight Southern/Midwestern drawl. However, in Future Soldier and Wildlands he's got a very deep, authoritative voice, courtesy of Steve Blum. It seems taking an EMP bomb to the face dropped his voice down a few octaves.
  • Badass Boast: Has a pretty good one in Advanced Warfighter 2 when Colonel Jimenez asks what his name is after he saves the Colonel's life by killing an enemy tank.
    Captain Mitchell: "I have no name, Colonel. I'm a Ghost. And I was never here."
  • The Cameo: Appears in the opening mission of Tom Clancy's H.A.W.X. where you support his Ghost team from the air as a H.A.W.X. pilot.
  • Career-Ending Injury: Though it's not explicitly stated, all indications are that taking an EMP bomb to the face at the end of Advanced Warfighter 2 was a major factor in him being Kicked Upstairs away from field operations and into being the commanding officer of the Ghosts.
  • Clothes Make the Superman: In the Xbox version of Ghost Recon 2, during Lone Wolf missions Mitchell is equipped with an Integrated Warfighter System suit to even the odds and help him One-Man Army the enemy strongpoints; it's a high-tech armored suit linked to an O.I.C.W. rifle and lets him blindfire accurately over cover using an integrated camera, launch smart airburst grenades, and laser designate targets for artillery or air support. This is apparently the prototype for the Advanced Warfighter system the Ghosts are equipped with in Advanced Warfighter, only even more "space marine" like in design.
  • The Hero: He's the main character in Ghost Recon 2 and Advanced Warfighter and serves as the commanding officer of the Ghosts in Future Soldier and Wildlands.
  • Heroic Mime: Not in most of his appearances, but for whatever reason, he doesn't talk in the Xbox/PS2 version of Advanced Warfighter. Many of his exact lines are given word-for-word to other characters instead.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: At the end of Advanced Warfighter 2 he calls down an EMP bomb strike on his own position to stop the Mercs from launching nuclear missiles into the United States. It's pointed out that, while the EMP itself is harmless to humans, the EMP bomb is still a bomb and potentially lethal. Sure enough Mitchell is knocked out by the strike and the game ends on a Cliffhanger as to whether or not he survives.
  • Jack of All Trades: As the player character and team leader, Mitchell has to engage in a wide variety of combat roles, including general infantry, sniper, Badass Driver, demolitions, etc.
  • The Leader: He's a Captain and the Ghost alpha team leader in Ghost Recon 2 and Advanced Warfighter, and gets promoted to Colonel and commanding officer of the Ghosts in Future Soldier and Wildlands.
  • Mission Control: In Future Soldier he's been promoted to the Ghosts' commander and gives the Ghosts their objectives and feeds them intel.
  • No Name Given: In Future Soldier his name is never mentioned in-game, only showing up in the credits.
  • One-Man Army: Though he's usually accompanied by his Ghost team, some missions require Mitchell to go in Lone Wolf style and take out dozens of hostiles by himself, though he usually manages it through stealth, ambushes, and superior equipment such as the Integrated Warfighter System in Ghost Recon 2.
  • Rare Guns: In the Xbox version of Ghost Recon 2 he gets a heavily tricked out O.I.C.W. rifle as part of his Integrated Warfighter System suit during Lone Wolf missions.
  • Remember the New Guy?: The Xbox version of Ghost Recon 2 mentions he fought in the Russian, Eritrean, and Cuban conflicts (from the first Ghost Recon game), even though he didn't actually appear in that game.
  • Screw the Rules, I'm Doing What's Right!: When forced to choose between saving comrades/allies/civilians and accomplishing mission objectives, Mitchell always tries to do both at the same time. This is most apparent in Summit Strike. Fortunately, he and his team happen to be good enough to pull it off.

Joe Ramirez

A second-generation Mexican-American and former teen hacker, Jose "Joe" Ramirez was an Army Ranger radio operator and squad leader who joined the Ghosts rather than be stuck at a desk job. Friendly and introverted, he has prominently served closely alongside Captain Mitchell ever since the events of Ghost Recon 2.
  • Decoy Protagonist: You play as him in the prologue mission of Future Soldier ( where he and his team die at the end of the prologue.)
  • Demoted to Extra: In all versions of Advanced Warfighter, Ramirez is injured by rebels in the first mission after being marked by Carlos Ontiveros. In the console versions, Mitchell rescues him and he becomes a selectable Ghost teammate. In the PC version, however, Mitchell never even encounters him and he just disappears from the rest of the game. He returns in both the console and PC version of Advanced Warfighter 2 as a selectable team member.
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: Like Jennifer Burke, Ramirez is a rifleman and serves a general purpose role in combat.
  • Killed Off for Real: Dies in the prologue of Future Soldier alongside the rest of his team to a Raven's Rock bomb.
  • The Lancer: Appears to be this to Captain Mitchell, as he's framed this way in the interview segments of the Xbox version of Ghost Recon 2 (being the only Ghost to appear together alongside Mitchell during his interview segments), and appearing alongside Mitchell in every installment of the series other than the PC version of the first Advanced Warfighter. He's also your primary squadmate throughout the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter, after Mitchell and Marcus Brown rescue him in the first level.
  • Trading Bars for Stripes: As a teen hacker, he got in trouble with the law a few times and was eventually recommended by a police officer that he put his skills to use in the Army before he got into serious trouble.
  • Unexplained Recovery: He was apparently killed in the Ghost Recon novel (which takes place after Advanced Warfighter 2), but is alive and the leader of his own Ghost team by the time of Future Soldier ( only to die, for real this time, in the prologue mission).

Jennifer Burke

Like Scott Mitchell, Jennifer Burke is a career Army soldier from a blue-collar background. Outspoken and rebellious, she served alongside Captain Mitchell during the two Korean conflicts, and was promoted to Captain of her own Ghost squad by the time of the Mexican uprising of 2013.
  • Action Girl: Alongside Alicia Diaz. Her bio also mentions she has an interest in extreme sports as well.
  • A Day in the Limelight: Burke and Salvatore receive a greater amount of focus in Summit Strike compared to the main game.
  • Demoted to Extra: In Advanced Warfighter, like Nick Salvatore and David Foster she's no longer a member of Mitchell's Ghost Team due to being promoted to the team leader of her own Ghost squad. Unlike Nick or David, she's never actually seen in-game and is only mentioned in dialogue.
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: Like Ramirez, Burke is a rifleman and serves a general purpose role in combat.
  • Uncertain Doom: In Advanced Warfighter, the last you hear of her, her position has been overrun by the rebels and communications with her has been lost. She's never mentioned again after that point and it's left unclear whether or not she was K.I.A.

Nick Salvatore

A boisterous, blue-collar Italian-American New Jersey native, Salvatore is a support gunner who served in Marine Force Recon before joining the Ghosts, where he served under Captain Mitchell during the two Korean conflicts. He was promoted to Captain of his own Ghost squad by the time of the Mexican uprising of 2013.
  • A Day in the Limelight: Salvatore and Burke receive a greater amount of focus in Summit Strike compared to the main game.
  • More Dakka: Serves as a support gunner along with Marcus Brown in Ghost Recon 2.
  • Porn Stache: Seems to have grown one at some point between Advanced Warfighter and Endwar.
  • Sleeves Are for Wimps: Fights with rolled up sleeves in all of his appearances, which does somewhat fit his role as a support gunner.
  • Uncertain Doom: In Advanced Warfighter, he and his team get overrun by Carlos and the Aguila 7, and the last you see of Nick he's critically injured and marked for medevac by Mitchell. He likely survives as he appears as a leader in the alternate continuity of Endwar.

Alicia Diaz

The tomboyish daughter of a Texas rancher who joined the U.S. Army, she was recruited into the Ghosts for her world class sniping skills. She has served as the squad's sniper in both Korean conflicts as well as during the Mexican uprising during the fighting in both Mexico City and Juarez. Has appeared as the squad's primary sniper in every Scott Mitchell game on consoles (other than the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter), but is notably absent from the PC games.
  • Action Girl: Alongside Jennifer Burke in Ghost Recon 2, and the sole female Ghost in the Advanced Warfighter series. It's mentioned in her bio that she was unable to serve in a combat role in the regular Army due to the existing restrictions at the time, but the Ghosts were not bound by said restrictions due to being an off-the-books black ops unit.
  • Adapted Out: Doesn't appear at all in the PC version of Advanced Warfighter or Advanced Warfighter 2, where her role is instead taken up by Richard Allen in the first game and John Hume in the second game. She's also missing from the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter, where Mike Kim serves as sniper support instead.
  • Cunning Linguist: Her bio mentions that she loves traveling and speaks several languages fluently, which proves a useful skill in field work.
  • Friendly Sniper: She's the team's sniper in both Ghost Recon 2 and the Advanced Warfighter series, and her bio indicates her personality is friendly, but not extroverted.
  • Glass Cannon: It's noted her smaller stature puts her at a disadvantage in hand-to-hand combat, but her sniper skills more than make up for it and she also trains in combat techniques designed to compensate for her smaller physique.
  • The Smurfette Principle: She's the only female Ghost in the console version of the Advanced Warfighter series, due to Jennifer Burke being Demoted to Extra. However, she's not the only female U.S. combatant, as Advanced Warfighter 2 also has Littlebird, an attack helicopter pilot.
  • Tomboy: Is mentioned as being one in her bio.

Marcus Brown

A former college football star who dropped out to join the Army, Brown's a career soldier who has served in both regular infantry and special forces before joining the Ghosts as their main support gunner. He has the unique distinction of being the only Ghost who has appeared as a squad member in every single Scott Mitchell game across all versions.
  • More Dakka: In every game he serves as the squad's support gunner, wielding an LMG.
  • Non-Idle Rich: it's mentioned in his bio that he's a former college football star from an affluent family who decided to join the military as an enlisted man instead of going into politics like his parents wanted.
  • The Reliable One: He's the only Ghost besides Scott Mitchell to appear as a selectable teammate in every single game of the "Mitchell Trilogy"; all of the other members of Mitchell's Ghost team are either missing from at least one of the games or missing from the PC versions.

Derrick Parker

The oldest member of the Ghosts, Parker is a career special forces soldier with a professional bearing. Serves as a member of Mitchell's squad in both Ghost Recon 2 games as well as the Xbox 360 version of Advanced Warfighter. He's promoted to the leader of the Ghosts' Bravo team in Advanced Warfighter 2 or the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter.
  • Adapted Out: He's completely missing from the PC version of Advanced Warfighter, which makes a scene in the PC version of Advanced Warfighter 2 where he and Mitchell reminiscence about fighting together in Mexico City something of a headscratcher.
  • Ascended Extra: He's completely missing from the PC version of Advanced Warfighter, and is merely one of several selectable squadmates in the Xbox 360 version. However, in the PS2/Xbox version, he becomes the leader of Bravo team and has a significantly larger role in the game (see Hero of Another Story below).
  • Badass in Distress: In the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter, he and Beasley are captured by Carlos Ontiveros in the final level and have to be rescued by Mitchell.
  • Bald, Black Leader Guy: He's an older Sergeant, the Xbox version of Ghost Recon 2 shows him sporting the cue ball and mustache look, and in Advanced Warfighter 2 he gets promoted to the leader of his own Ghost squad.
  • Death by Adaptation: He and Beasley are killed by Carlos in the bad ending of the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter, if you fail to defeat Carlos and rescue them in the final level.
  • Demolitions Expert: He's a grenadier, alongside David Foster in Ghost Recon 2 and Richard Allen and Bo Jenkins in Advanced Warfighter.
  • Field Promotion: In the 2 days between Advanced Warfighter and Advanced Warfighter 2 he gets promoted from a member of Mitchell's squad to the leader of his own Ghost team, likely due to the losses of Captains Jennifer Burke and Nick Salvatore during the Mexico City revolt. (This actually seems to be an artifact from the rare PS2/Xbox version, in which he was the Bravo team leader the whole game).
  • Hero of Another Story: In the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter, he's the leader of Bravo team and accomplishes numerous objectives off-screen throughout the entire game while Mitchell and Alpha team are doing their own thing. He's even the one to actually capture General Ontiveros towards the end of the game.
  • Old Soldier: He's the oldest member of Mitchell's Ghost team, being at least a full decade older than the majority of the other members.

David Foster

A member of a long-running military family from rural Alaska, Foster is the youngest member of the Ghosts at the time of the two Korean conflicts. He's promoted to Captain of his own Ghost squad by the time of the Mexican uprising of 2013.
  • Demolitions Expert: He's a grenadier, alongside Derrick Parker.
  • Demoted to Extra: In Advanced Warfighter, he's no longer a member of Mitchell's Ghost Team due to having been promoted to the leader of his own Ghost squad. He's mentioned a couple of times by General Martin and has about 2 lines of dialogue in the mission "Ready for Bear". His character model in the cross-com communications window is noticeably much lower resolution than the more major characters.
  • New Meat: In Ghost Recon 2 he's the youngest member of the Ghosts, though he's still had 3 years of service in the military at that point.

Mike Kim

A fourth-generation Korean-American with a focused, quiet personality, he and Alicia Diaz serves as the snipers of Mitchell's Ghost team during the two Korean conflicts. In the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter, he's been promoted to Captain of Charlie team, which focuses on providing sniper support to other Ghost teams.
  • Adapted Out: After Ghost Recon 2, he only appears in the rare PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter, and is completely missing from the PC and Xbox 360 versions as well as Advanced Warfighter 2.
  • Token Enemy Minority: Downplayed. He's the only Korean-American member of the Ghosts, but since he's a fourth-generation American his background is of limited utility to the mission during the two Korean conflicts, unlike, say, John Kozak's fluency in Russian during the Raven Rock conflict.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: He disappears between Ghost Recon 2 and the Advanced Warfighter series. He occasionally provides sniper support as leader of Charlie team in the rare PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter, and also appears as a unit in Endwar.

Antagonists

Major General Paik

An Ax-Crazy North Korean General who runs North Korean's nuclear weapons program and wants to use the sinking of the U.S.S. Clarence Walsh as a pretext to launch a war of reunification against South Korean. He's the main antagonist of the PS2 version of Ghost Recon 2, but is actually acting on behalf of his superior, General Jung.
  • Better to Die than Be Killed: At the end of the final level, he taunts Mitchell from behind bulletproof glass before shooting himself in the head rather than let himself be captured or killed by the Ghosts.
  • Big Bad: Of the PS2 version of Ghost Recon 2, though he's actually only The Dragon to General Jung.
  • Blood Knight: He launches a war of conquest based on what he knows are highly suspect justifications, and uses a lot of Proud Warrior Race Guy language during his Evil Gloating at the end of the final level.
  • Evil Gloating: In the final level he taunts you over the base's loudspeakers after all the gunfire alerts him to the fact that an American special forces team has invaded the base.
  • General Ripper: Paik is determined to launch a war of reunification even after it becomes evident the war is the result of third-party manipulation by a PMC, and is even willing to escalation to nuclear war after North Korea makes peace with the United States.
  • Last Stand: After you spend the entire game dismantling his power base and ultimately foil his attempt to seize control of the country's nuclear arsenal, Paik gets disavowed by the North Korean leadership and is forced to retreat to a remote abandoned military base in the far frozen north, where he and his remaining soldiers make a last stand against the Ghosts.
  • Let No Crisis Go to Waste: Even after the North Koreans realize the war was caused by a False Flag Operation by a third-party PMC, General Paik is still hell-bent on using the crisis as an excuse to engage in a war to reunify the peninsula under North Korean rule, or start a nuclear war with the West if that fails.
  • Renegade Splinter Faction: After the Americans and North Koreans make peace and sign a ceasefire thanks to the work of Sam Fisher in exposing the truth behind the sinking of the USS Clarence Walsh, Paik unilaterally attempts to seize control of the North Korean nuclear arsenal and start a nuclear war with the West.
  • See You in Hell: His last words to Captain Mitchell.
  • Taking You with Me: After realizing the Ghosts are minutes away from either capturing him or putting a bullet in his head, he tries to launch or detonate his last nuclear missile to make sure the Ghosts and/thousands of others go down with him.
  • 0% Approval Rating: It's noted that Paik becomes wildly unpopular in North Korea as the war goes on. Both the civilian population and even his own soldiers turn against him due to his treatment of them, and even his own chief nuclear technician Major Sung turns against him after learning about the full extent of his nuclear ambitions. By the end of the game he's been disavowed by the rest of the North Korean military leadership and is abandoned by all but a small contingent of hardcore supporters.

General Jung Chong-Sun

A ruthless North Korean General who wants to unify both Koreas under his supreme leadership. He was the Greater-Scope Villain to Major General Paik in the PS2 version of Ghost Recon 2, before becoming the Big Bad of the Xbox version.
  • Big Bad: Of the Xbox version. He's also The Man Behind the Man of Major General Paik, the Big Bad of the PS2 version.
  • Dead Hat Shot: After he gets blown up the only thing left of him is his Nice Hat.
  • Dirty Coward: Unlike General Paik, Jung fully intends to survive his Taking You with Me moment and tries to flee in a helicopter before the nuke goes off.
  • Flat Character: He only has a couple lines of dialogue in The Stinger to the PS2 version, and has no dialogue in the Xbox version where he's the Big Bad. Though the actions of his soldiers acting under his orders (such as attacking a field hospital, massacring his own laborers, and trying to flood both Koreas) speaks a lot about how ruthless he is.
  • Four Eyes, Zero Soul: Wears a set of reflective Sunglasses Indoors.
  • Leave No Witnesses: After secretly assembling a nuclear bomb at a North Korean quarry, Jung has all the quarry workers rounded up and blows them all up inside a mine shaft, partly because of this trope and partly because he just wants to kill as many people as possible before his downfall.
  • General Ripper: He's not as overtly Ax-Crazy as General Paik was, but is still a ruthless warmonger who's ultimately determined to kill thousands in a Taking You with Me moment after his army starts to lose. Also, as The Man Behind the Man of General Paik, it's clear that he was on board with all of Paik's crazy actions.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: Of the PS2 version, before becoming the Big Bad of the Xbox version, which takes place a couple of years later.
  • Hellish Copter: At the very end of the Xbox version he attempts to escape in a transport helicopter; Mitchell shoots him down with a rocket launcher and he crashes into a mountain.
    • Oh, Crap!: The look on his face as his helicopter slams right into a mountain.
  • Orcus on His Throne: He's too busy directing the war from Pyongyang to actually do anything himself. He notably has even less screen time than General Paik did. His only presence in the series is a short appearance in The Stinger of the PS2 version, some intel photos of him in the intro of the Xbox version, and a very short appearance at the very end of the Xbox version where you blow him up.
  • President Evil: Becomes the secret leader of North Korea in the Xbox version after overthrowing the current regime and turning them into a Puppet King.
  • The Starscream: He overthrows the North Korean government and takes over between the events of the PS2 version and the Xbox version.
  • Taking You with Me: At the end of the Xbox version, with his army on the brink of defeat, Jung attempts to use a nuclear bomb to destroy the country's largest dam, killing thousands of civilians in both North and South Korea as a last "screw you" to both sides.
  • Undying Loyalty: Major Jacobs mentions that Jung's soldiers are fanatically loyal to him. Unlike General Paik, General Jung never suffers from 0% Approval Rating even after the direction of the war starts turning against him.

Asad Rahil

A Pakistani arms dealer who assassinates the President of Kazakhstan and tries to use his wealth and connections to replace the government with corrupt military officials on his payroll. Serves as the main antagonist of the Ghost Recon 2: Summit Strike expansion pack to the Xbox version of Ghost Recon 2.
  • Bald of Evil: Has male pattern baldness and is the Big Bad of the campaign.
  • Big Bad: Of the Summit Strike expansion pack.
  • Frontline General: Since he's an arms dealer and not a General, his organization isn't large enough for him to delegate out everything and he has to do a lot of his dirty work himself, as seen in the intro where he's personally leading a raid to steal chemical weapons from a Kyrgyzstan disposal site.
  • It's Personal: Mitchell and his team become personally invested in taking Rahil down after Rahil kills Grigoriy Koslov, the Ghosts' main ally amongst the Kazakh loyalists. Rahil for his part has absolutely no idea who Mitchell is or even that he's coming for him.
  • Mad Bomber: He seems quite fond of solving problems by blowing them up. Besides assassinating the Kazakh President and his cabinet with a huge bomb, he also uses nerve gas bombs to cover his escape when stealing chemical weapons from a disposal site in Kyrgyzstan, and kills Koslov's squad with a bomb.
  • Murder Is the Best Solution: When the Kazakhstan government starts to interfere with Rahil's business interests in Kazakhstan, his solution is to blow up the entire government and start maneuvering military officers on his payroll into positions of power to replace them.
  • Rogue Agent: He's a former Pakistani military Major who went into business for himself as an international arms dealer.
  • Wolfpack Boss: At the end of the final mission, Rahil and a number of his personal bodyguards are trapped in a valley dead end after their truck crashes. You fight your way through his bodyguards before blowing Rahil away, who's hiding behind the truck. Rahil himself is ex-military and knows how to use an assault rifle, but realistically is no tougher than his Mooks.

     Advanced Warfighter 

The Ghosts

For Scott Mitchell, Joe Ramirez, Alicia Diaz, Marcus Brown, or Derrick Parker, see the character folder for Ghost Recon 2.

K.C. Kirkland

A member of the Ghosts who only appears in the first Advanced Warfighter game. He serves as a support gunner in the Xbox 360 version and as a rifleman in the PC version. Is most notable for being one of your 3 squadmates alongside Marcus Brown and Richard Allen in the PC version.
  • Adapted Out: Doesn't appear at all in the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter.
  • A Day in the Limelight: He's one of the less developed Ghosts in the console versions, and doesn't even make the transfer to Advanced Warfighter 2. However, he's one of your 3 pre-assigned squadmates (alongside Marcus Brown and Richard Allen) in the PC version of the first game.
  • More Dakka: He's a support gunner in the console versions of Advanced Warfighter, but is instead a standard rifleman in the PC version.
  • Demoted to Extra: He's no longer a selectable Ghost in Advanced Warfighter 2, though he does show up as part of Derrick Parker's Bravo Team.

Richard Allen

A member of the Ghosts who only appears in the first Advanced Warfighter game. He serves as a grenadier in the Xbox 360 version and as a sniper in the PC version. Is most notable for being one of your 3 squadmates alongside Marcus Brown and K.C. Kirkland in the PC version. In Advanced Warfighter 2, he's replaced by John Hume.
  • Adapted Out: Doesn't appear at all in the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter.
  • A Day in the Limelight: He's one of the less developed Ghosts in the console versions, and doesn't even make the transfer to Advanced Warfighter 2. However, he's one of your 3 pre-assigned squadmates (alongside Marcus Brown and K.C. Kirkland) in the PC version of the first game.
  • Demolitions Expert: He's a grenadier in the Xbox 360 version of Advanced Warfighter. In the PC version, he's a sniper instead.
  • Killed Off for Real/Back for the Dead: He dies along with Joe Ramirez in the prologue mission of Future Soldier.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: He disappears between Advanced Warfighter and Advanced Warfighter 2, being replaced by John Hume. He reappears in the prologue of Future Soldier, where he dies alongside Joe Ramirez.

Matt Beasley

A loner from the inner-city streets of Oakland, Beasley is independent and highly talented. After serving as infantry during the invasion of Iraq and later as a member of the 82nd Airborne Rangers, Beasley joined the Ghosts after being impressed fighting alongside them as a member of the Airborne. Beasley, Ramirez, and Smith serve as riflemen in Mitchell's squad in both Advanced Warfighter games.
  • Adapted Out: He's missing from the PC version of Advanced Warfighter 1 (where only Brown, Kirkland, and Allen are available as squadmates), and Demoted to Extra in the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter 1 (which has a much greater focus on the older Ghosts from Ghost Recon 2).
  • Bus Crash: He's killed by a suicide bomber in the Ghost Recon novel, which takes place after Advanced Warfighter 2.
  • Cunning Linguist: Seems to have a knack for picking up languages. He picked up Spanish from growing up in Oakland and learned Farsi and a few other Afghan dialects during his time in the Army.
  • Death by Adaptation: He and Derrick Parker are killed by Carlos in the bad ending of the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter if you fail to save them or defeat Carlos.
  • Demoted to Extra: In the PS2/Xbox version of the first Advanced Warfighter, Beasley is part of Derrick Parker's Bravo team. Unlike Parker, he has zero dialogue.
  • Genius Bruiser: While he isn't engaged in any professional fields, he's described as an unusually fast learner, having done well in high school without even putting in much effort as well as being a quick learner in his military training. He also seems to have a knack for picking up languages.
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: Like Ramirez and Smith, he's a rifleman and serves a general purpose role in combat.
  • Unexplained Accent: Downplayed; but despite the Ghosts having several members of Latin American heritage, Beasley is the only team member with a noticeable Latin American accent, even though you wouldn't expect this from his name or background (his bio lists him as "some kid from Oakland").

Bo Jenkins

An easy-going though undisciplined jock from Alaska. A large and somewhat impatient man with a knack for blowing stuff up, he serves as the primary demolitions man in Mitchell's Ghost squad in both Advanced Warfighter games.
  • Adapted Out: He's missing from the PC version of Advanced Warfighter 1 (where only Brown, Kirkland, and Allen are available as squadmates) as well as the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter 1 (which has a much greater focus on the older Ghosts from Ghost Recon 2).
  • Artificial Stupidity: In the PC version of Advanced Warfighter 2, there's a very real risk he'll blow up you or his other teammates with his grenade launcher unless you're very careful to maneuver him separate from the rest of the squad with very specific movement orders.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: He's the squad's demolitions specialist and in the PC version of Advanced Warfighter 2, his infinite ammo grenade launcher can be very powerful against groups of rebel soldiers. Unfortunately due to the Artificial Stupidity issues mentioned above he can be as much of a danger to your squad as he is to the enemy.
  • The Big Guy: His bio mentions him as being this, being a large, outgoing man as well as a bodybuilder and sports enthusiast. His bio lists him as being 6' 5" tall and 280 pounds. Though it's downplayed in-game since all Ghosts use 90% the same character model.
  • Demolitions Expert: He's your squad's grenadier/demolitions soldier in both the console and PC versions of Advanced Warfighter 2. He also shares this role with Richard Allen and Derrick Parker in the Xbox 360 version of the first Advanced Warfighter.
  • Leeroy Jenkins: He's a grenade launcher-wielding demolitions specialist and his bio mentions that his combat style is aggressive and impatient, though not completely reckless. This is news for anyone who picks him as a team member in the PC version, as (due to flaky A.I.) he tends to fire recklessly and blow up teammates with friendly fire if you don't keep him separated from the rest of the team via team formation orders. Rather fitting given his name.

Paul Smith

An outdoorsman from rural California. Although quiet and disciplined as a soldier, he's also easily bored, and wasn't planning on re-upping after his first tour of duty in the Army, until meeting and being impressed by Captain Mitchell, who was serving as a combat instructor at the time. After learning from Mitchell, Smith joined the Green Berets and later the Ghosts, serving as a rifleman and the youngest member of Mitchell's squad during the Mexican uprising in both Mexico City and Juarez.
  • Adapted Out: Doesn't appear at all in the PC version of the series, likely due to GRIN deciding the squad didn't need another general purpose rifleman in addition to Ramirez and Beasley.
  • The Apprentice: His bio lists him as being a former Army student of Captain Mitchell's who joined the Ghosts after being impressed by the Captain's abilities and demeanor. He's also the youngest member of the Ghosts in the Advanced Warfighter games.
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: Like Ramirez and Beasley, he's a rifleman and serves a general purpose role in combat.

Annibale Cruz

A support gunner in Mitchell's Ghost squad. Has the distinction of being the least seen or developed Ghost in the Mitchell games, only appearing in the Xbox 360 version of the first Advanced Warfighter game.
  • Adapted Out: Doesn't appear at all in the PC version of the series, or the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter. As a result, his sole appearance is in the Xbox 360 version of the first Advanced Warfighter game.
  • More Dakka: He's a support gunner, alongside Marcus Brown and K.C. Kirkland.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: He disappears between Advanced Warfighter and Advanced Warfighter 2.

John Hume

A farmer, hunter, and outdoorsman from Salt Lake City, Utah who served both in General Infantry and the Green Berets before joining the Ghosts. He joins Mitchell's Ghost squad in Advanced Warfighter 2, where he serves as either the squad's anti-armor soldier (console versions) or the squad's sniper (PC version).
  • Ascended Extra: "Jhon Hume" was one of the anonymous supporting American infantry from the Xbox 360 version of Advanced Warfighter. In Advanced Warfighter 2 he's ascended to a member of Mitchell's Ghost squad, replacing Richard Allen as a demolitions soldier (console version) or the squad's sniper (PC version).
  • Cunning Linguist: His bio mentions that he speaks Spanish and also picked up Tagalog during a deployment in the Philippines.
  • Demolitions Expert: He's your squad's anti-tank soldier in the console versions of Advanced Warfighter 2. His weaponry is focused on anti-armor, in contrast to Bo Jenkins whose explosive equipment is focused on anti-infantry or anti-light vehicle. For some reason in the PC version he's a sniper instead.
  • Genius Bruiser: Excelled in high school and was going to enroll in M.I.T., before the death of his father forced him to take over the family farm. After a few years of farming he decided to enlist in the military instead.

Alex Nolan

A nerd from a long line of doctors, he graduated medical school, but enlisted in the military as a field medic after encountering the Ghosts while doing humanitarian volunteer work in Eritrea and being greatly impressed by them. He joins Mitchell's Ghost squad in Advanced Warfighter 2 as a combat medic.
  • Adapted Out: Doesn't appear at all in the PC version of the series.
  • Badass Bookworm: He was a nerd in high school and went to med school and became a family doctor; he then joined the military after witnessing the Ghosts in action as a medical volunteer during the Eritrea conflict (Desert Siege), eventually becoming a member of the Ghosts himself. He also wears Nerd Glasses and is the only character in the series to wear corrective eyewear.
  • Bus Crash: He's killed fighting the Taliban in the Ghost Recon novel, which takes place after Advanced Warfighter 2.
  • The Medic/Combat Medic: He serves as the squad's medic in Advanced Warfighter 2, and is the only Ghost medic in the series.

Allies

General Joshua Keating

The commander of U.S. SOCOM and Captain Mitchell's commanding officer during the events of the two Advanced Warfighter games. He also appears in Tom Clancy's H.A.W.X.
  • Big Good: He's the commander of U.S. SOCOM and your commanding officer in the Advanced Warfighter series and serves this role.
  • It Has Been an Honor: Keating gives this to Mitchell at the end of Advanced Warfighter 2 when it appears that Mitchell is about to pull a Heroic Sacrifice to stop the mercs from nuking the U.S.
  • Mission Control: He's the primary source of orders for Captain Mitchell and the Ghosts.
  • Sudden Name Change: His first name is "Joshua" in the 2008 Ghost Recon novel, but he's identified as "Tom Keating" in H.A.W.X..

Major General "Bulldog" Martin

The commander of the U.S. Marine forces on the ground during the Mexican rebellion.
  • Big Good: He's the commander of the U.S. forces in Panama during the co-op campaign of the console versions of Advanced Warfighter 2.
  • Frontline General: In the console versions of Advanced Warfighter, at the end of the game he personally leads the assault on the Palacio Nacional to attempt to capture General Ontiveros. He's also personally active during the conflict, even meeting up with the Ghosts face-to-face a couple of times, instead of simply directing the action from the safety of some bunker war-room; this causes an issue when his helicopter gets shot down and the Ghosts have to detour to rescue him.
  • Semper Fi: He's the commander of the U.S. Marine forces on the ground during the Mexican rebellion and a tough-as-nails leader.

Lt. Barnes

A U.S. intelligence officer who works closely with General Keating.
  • The Smart Guy: He's the Ghosts' intelligence officer and briefs them regarding U.S. intelligence and advanced technology.

Louie

The Ghosts' quartermaster, who briefs them regarding their weaponry selection as well as the features of their Integrated Warfighter System suits. He was added in the PC version of the first Advanced Warfighter.
  • Adapted Out: Inverted; Louie was added to the PC version of Advanced Warfighter to serve as the Ghosts' quartermaster and explain the more complex weapon selection system in the PC version. He also serves this role in Future Soldier, though he's only heard in voice-over and never seen in person.
  • Career-Ending Injury: He mentions being forced out of field operations after losing his left knee in Columbia.

"Bud" Aldridge

A Blackhawk helicopter pilot and former instructor at WHINSEC. He serves as the Ghosts' "eye in the sky", relaying them airborne intelligence as well as mission objectives from Command, as well as serving as their helicopter transport pilot.
  • Getaway Driver: He and Rosen take turns serving as the Ghosts' Blackhawk transport pilot.
  • Mission Control: He directs Mitchell and the Ghosts throughout the game over the cross-com system.
  • A Pupil of Mine, Until He Turned to Evil: Bud mentions having trained Carlos Ontiveros at WHINSEC. Carlos later gloats about how Bud never appreciated his talents after killing him.
  • Sacrificial Lion: He's killed by Carlos Ontiveros near the end of the first Advanced Warfighter.

Lt. Josh Rosen

A Blackhawk helicopter pilot who provides air transport and support to the Ghosts, similar to Bud, and also trains the team on the features of the Cross Com interface. He has a more prominent role in Advanced Warfighter 2.
  • Adapted Out: He doesn't appear in the PC version of Advanced Warfighter due to his role as the tutorial host being taken by Louie.
  • Ascended Extra: He received minimum characterization or screentime in Advanced Warfighter (where you didn't even see his face due to his flight helmet), but has a much larger role in Advanced Warfighter 2.
  • Getaway Driver: He and Bud take turns serving as the Ghosts' Blackhawk transport pilot.
  • Hellish Copter: His Blackhawk gets shot down by the Mercs in Advanced Warfighter 2, forcing the Ghosts to find an alternate escape route. They also later launch a rescue mission to retrieve Rosen from a Hacienda where he's being held captive.
  • The Smart Guy: In the standard Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter, he serves as Mitchell's tech support for his Integrated Warfighter System equipment.

Colonel Jimenez

The leader of the Mexican Loyalist forces on the ground in Juarez in Advanced Warfighter 2.
  • Doomed Hometown: Jimenez laments the rather abysmal state of Juarez after days of fighting and the detonation of at least one nuclear warhead by the rebels.
  • Frontline General: He's the leader of the Mexican Loyalist forces in Juarez and is active in ground combat.
  • Redshirt Army: Jimenez's Mexican Loyalist troops are often in peril and frequently have to be rescued by the Ghosts. For their part, they're at least able to hold out relatively well until the Ghosts actually arrive at their position. They also appear as a controllable support squad in a couple of missions.

President Ballantine

The President of the United States at the time of the Mexican uprising. He's in Mexico City along with the Canadian Prime Minister and President of Mexico to sign the North American Joint Security Agreement, when Mexican military elements hostile to the treaty stage a coup d'état, killing the Canadian Prime Minister and putting the two Presidents in mortal danger.
  • Honor Before Reason: At the end of Advanced Warfighter 2, he refuses the Pentagon's advice to nuke Juarez to prevent the mercs from launching nukes into the U.S., reasoning the civilian casualties would be too great.
  • Our Presidents Are Different: Of the President Target variety, as he gets captured by Carlos and Aguila 7 about halfway through the game. Turns into a mild case of President Action when you rescue him, as he pulls out a pistol and will happily engage any Aguila 7 Elite Mooks that get between you and the helicopter sent to extract him. He's not exactly the greatest combatant, but hey, points for effort.

President Ruiz-Pena

The President of Mexico at the time of the Mexican uprising, who wishes for closer relations with the United States. General Ontiveros and the military forces loyal to him, who are hostile to the idea of closer ties with the United States, end up staging a coup against Ruiz-Pena.
  • Adapted Out: In the Xbox 360 version he actually has a decent amount of dialogue; in the PC version, he has zero dialogue and the only time you actually see him in person he's an unconscious body. You don't even see him at all in the PS2/Xbox version, only hear about him in dialogue.
  • Our Presidents Are Different: President Target. You have to save him twice from rebel soldiers. In the Xbox 360 version, he's able to escape on his own two feet; in the PC version, he's seriously injured by the U.S. embassy bomb and has to be carried to a medevac chopper by you.

Private First Class Provenanzo

A Humvee driver who ends up transporting Captain Mitchell and the squad a few times throughout Advanced Warfighter 2.
  • Abhorrent Admirer: The game begins with him fanboying over Mitchell and his exploit in the first Advanced Warfighter, but the man is far from amused.
    "I'd be honored if you'd just keep your eyes on the road, soldier."
  • Adapted Out: He does not appear in the PC version, with his role as the driver being taken up by a generic Mexican soldier.
  • Badass Driver: Manages to skillfully navigate MG emplacements and roadblocks deep behind enemy lines while under heavy fire, all that while Keating is barking orders on the video screen. Only eating a missile from a MIL-28 Havoc does him in,
  • The Cavalry: He conveniently happens to be in the area while Rosen's Blackhawk has been shot down and the Ghosts are ambushed by the mercenaries and drives in the nick of time before they get overwhelmed.
  • Getaway Driver: Drives Mitchell to the warzone a few times.

Antagonists

Colonel Carlos Ontiveros

A Mexican special forces officer and the leader of Aguila 7 (the 7 Eagles), a Mexican special forces group that spearheads a coup d'état against the Mexican President in an attempt to stop the North American Joint Security Agreement. He's the main antagonist of the first Advanced Warfighter game and has the distinction of being the most active villain in the Ghost Recon series.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking: In the PS2 version of Advanced Warfighter, Carlos is a straight-up Made of Iron Final Boss who you fight in a boss arena in the basement of the U.S. embassy and who can take a few dozen bullets before dropping. This gives him the distinction of being by far the toughest enemy in the series, other than the Predator Bonus Boss fight in Wildlands. Downplayed in the PC version; Carlos is very dangerous due to his ideal camping position and the skill level of his A.I., but he realistically drops in a couple of shots just like any other human.
  • Badass Normal:
    • Carlos and his Aguila 7 special forces manage to inflict far more casualties on the Ghosts and their allies than Bodark or Santa Blanca, despite lacking the advanced technology of the former or the infinite money of the latter. It's revealed in the ending that a large part of his success comes from having access to the Ghosts' communications channels due to a high-level mole inside the U.S. military.
    • Aguila 7 in general is this compared to the Ghosts; they have special forces training, body armor, and high-grade weaponry, but lack the Ghosts' high-tech cross-coms systems.
  • Boss Banter: Carlos has a lot of unique dialogue taunting Captain Mitchell in the PS2 version of the game, both when attacking you in an Apache attack chopper and later in the final boss fight in the basement of the U.S. embassy. He has less dialogue in the Xbox 360 and PC versions, but does still taunt you over the cross-com several times during the final level.
  • Big Bad: Of the first Advanced Warfighter game.
  • Co-Dragons: In the PS2/Xbox version of Advanced Warfighter, Carlos has a pair of high-ranking officers, Colonel Valdez and Colonel Obregon, serving as his seconds-in-command.
  • Cold-Blooded Torture: He carves up Captain Bowman with a combat knife to get the codes to unlock the nuclear football.
  • Combat Pragmatist:
    • In the PC version, if you try to face him mano-a-mano, Carlos can fake a reload to bait you into rushing him, at which point he'll ventilate you with his LMG.
    • In the PS2 version, Carlos shoots down Bravo Team's Blackhawk by ambushing them in a stolen Apache. By the time the Blackhawk pilot and gunners realizes the "friendly" air unit isn't at all friendly, Carlos has already done enough damage for the rest of the fight to be a foregone conclusion.
    • The end of the game reveals that a large part of Carlos' success against the Ghosts is due to listening in on their communications channels, due to a high-level mole in the U.S. military telling him how to do so.
  • Composite Character: In the console versions of Advanced Warfighter, General Ontiveros (the actual leader of the coup) and his son special forces Colonel Carlos Ontiveros are two separate characters. In the PC version, General Ontiveros is removed completely, and Carlos is promoted to General Carlos Ontiveros and serves as the sole leader of the coup.
  • Disney Villain Death: In the Xbox 360 version of the game, you shoot him off the roof of the U.S. Embassy, and watch him plunge to his death on your cross-com.
  • Dragon Their Feet: In the console versions of the game, Carlos escapes with the nuclear football and tries to start World War III after his father General Ontiveros is captured by U.S. forces.
  • Evil Gloating: Towards the end of the game, he kills Bud and steals his cross-com, spending the rest of the game taunting Mitchell over the Ghosts' comm systems.
  • False Flag Operation: After his coup is broken and the Mexican loyalists retake the National Palace, Carlos escapes to the U.S. Embassy and attempts to use the nuclear football to launch America's nukes, likely in the hopes of triggering a SKYNET scenario with Russia and China which will result in a Mutual Kill of the superpowers, leaving Mexico as the last nation standing.
    • The PS2/Xbox version elaborates that Carlos isn't targeting anyone in particular with the nukes, and is merely trying to demonstrate to the American people that their national security is nonexistent by proving that a third party can launch their nukes.
  • Frontline General: Carlos is by far the most active villain in the series, acting against the Ghosts throughout the game rather than simply engaging in politics offscreen and only being encountered just immediately before you kill him like all other Ghost Recon Big Bads. He's also one of the few Big Bads to actually fight the Ghosts directly at the end instead of being a Non-Action Big Bad who's either The Unfought or a Cutscene Boss.
  • Glass Cannon: Carlos is no tougher than the rest of his Elite Mooks, but in the PC version he's equipped with a mk48 LMG and has insanely good aim and reaction times, and can cut you down in a split second if you step into his line of sight. Instead of facing him mano-a-mano, your best bet is to either chuck a couple of grenades into the room he's camping in, or send your entire squad in to rush him.
  • Hellish Copter: In the PS2 version he steals an Apache attack chopper and uses it to shoot down Bravo team's Blackhawk and capture them before engaging Mitchell in a straight-up helicopter boss fight.
  • Hero Killer: Carlos gets Ramirez injured in the opening level, and later he and his Aguila 7 Elite Mooks blow up Captain Abreu and succeed in taking out Ghost teams led by Jennifer Burke and Nick Salvatore, likely killing the former and critically wounding the latter, which allows him to capture the U.S. President and his nuclear football. He then tortures football carrier Captain Bowman for the access codes, and kills Bud and steals his helicopter to escape to the U.S. Embassy to try and launch America's nukes. In the PS2/Xbox version he even captures and potentially kills Derrick Parker and Matt Beasley. Of all the series' villains he's by far the most successful in inflicting losses against the Ghosts and their allies; hell, in the PS2 version it's possible for him to have killed half of the cast of Ghost Recon 2 by the end of the game.
  • It's Personal: He's the only Ghost Recon villain (besides Asad Rahil from Summmit Strike) that Mitchell ever develops a personal vendetta against, due to his killing of Bud towards the end of the game. He's also the only Ghost Recon villain who ever refers to Mitchell by name or even knows who he even is.
  • Majored in Western Hypocrisy: It's mentioned that he was a former pupil of Bud's at WHINSEC in America. This isn't very surprising since he's a member of the Mexican military and the U.S. and Mexico are allies, so it would make sense for a Mexican special forces soldier to receive some training in America. It's also Truth in Television; former alumni of SOA, the precursor to WHINSEC, have included such South American luminaries as Manuel Noriega and the founders of the Zetas Cartel.
  • My Death Is Only The Beginning: Killing Carlos brings stability back to Mexico City, but doesn't end the Mexican rebellion; Juan De La Barrera takes over the Mexican rebels in the sequel, and anti-U.S. insurrections spring up in multiple other Latin American nations as well.
  • The Sociopath: In the Xbox 360 version, President Ruiz-Pena warns Mitchell that Carlos feels no fear and kills without hesitation. Mitchell quips that the "man without fear" is about to see a Ghost.
  • Wolfpack Boss: In all versions of Advanced Warfighter he and his remaining Aguila 7 Elite Mooks make a last stand at the remains of the U.S. Embassy while attempting to use the nuclear football to launch America's nukes. In the Xbox 360 version he starts shooting at you from the roof of the embassy after you kill enough waves of his soldiers. In the PC version he's positioned in the perfect camping spot in a back room of the embassy, which cannot be sniped from outside and has only one entry point with no cover. He's diligently covering said entry point with an LMG and protected by two Elite Mooks, while you also have to fight you way through a couple dozen Elite Mooks outside just to get to him.

Commandante Juan De La Barrera

Takes over the Mexican uprising after the death of Carlos Ontiveros, in a continued attempt to overthrow the current Mexican administration and prevent the signing of the North American Joint Security Agreement. In contrast to Carlos, De La Barrera is an older politician in a suit and seems to be more focused on giving news interviews than actively engaging in combat. He's the main antagonist of Advanced Warfighter 2.
  • Big Bad: Of Advanced Warfighter 2.
  • Dirty Communists: While not explicitly stated, his anti-U.S. rhetoric and promise to seize and nationalize all foreign businesses to "give the means of production back to the people" certainly give off this vibe. This is further reinforced by the rebel emblem being a red fist with yellow stars in the multiplayer.
  • Dragon Ascendant: He takes over the Mexican rebellion after the death of Carlos Ontiveros.
  • Hellish Copter: He attacks you in a Havok attack helicopter at the end of the first of the three endgame levels. In the console version you duel him in an attack helicopter of your own, while in the PC version you and your Ghost squad fight him from the ground alongside a U.S. tank while a massive wave of rebel fighters, including an enemy tank, bear down on your position. Bringing a missile launcher into the mission makes the fight go much easier, as otherwise his Havok can soak several magazines of gunfire before going down, and his missiles can really do a number on your squad and your tank.
  • My Death Is Only The Beginning: Killing him does nothing to impede his plan to have mercenaries launch a stolen nuclear missile into the United States; even after killing him, Mitchell has to continue putting considerable effort into foiling the plot.
  • Named After Somebody Famous: Appears to have taken a nomme de guerre naming himself after the leader of the Los Niños Héroes from the 1847 Battle of Chapultepec of the Mexican-American War. Either that or his parents actually named him that, in which case they sure were setting him up to become the leader of an anti-US insurrection.
  • Non-Action Big Bad: Unlike Carlos Ontiveros, who was a special forces officer, De La Barrera seems to be a politician in a suit and never engages in combat himself. You fight a helicopter gunship duel against him about 3/4ths of the way through the game, but it seems like he's just a passenger in the gunship and rather unlikely that he's actually piloting it himself.
  • Orcus on His Throne: De La Barrera only appears in two or three television broadcasts early in the game, as well as the mission in which you kill him later in the game (during said mission he has zero dialogue and is never seen personally).
  • Private Military Contractor: With Carlos' Aguila 7 defeated, De La Barrera turns to a Panamanian PMC to supply him with Elite Mooks and steal Ukrainian nuclear warheads and the Pakistani medium-range missiles he needs to launch them into the U.S.
  • Revenge Before Reason: In the PC version of Advanced Warfighter 2. Rather like Colonel Bliss from The Division, he manages to escape in an attack helicopter and likely would have succeeded if he had just made a run for it like General Jung tried to. Instead, his attack chopper sticks around to try and kill you, giving you plenty of time to shoot it down.

Colonel Gabriel Alvaro

The leader of the rebels in Panama, who is working closely with De La Barerra and his Mexican rebels in an anti-U.S. insurrection springing up in several countries across Latin America. He serves as the main antagonist of Advanced Warfighter 2's co-op campaign, and is also briefly mentioned once in a news broadcast early in the main game.
  • Adapted Out: Doesn't appear at all in the PC version, due to the lack of a separate co-op campaign. He's only mentioned once in one of the news reports in the beginning of the game, which mentions him as being the leader of the Panamanian rebels working together with De La Barrera's Mexican rebels.
  • Big Bad: Of the Advanced Warfighter 2 co-op campaign.
  • Nice Hat: He wears a red beret to distinguish him from the regular troops in the final level.
  • Flat Character: Colonel Alvaro has zero dialogue and is only mentioned in mission briefings and serving as your final target in the last level of the co-op campaign.
  • Rogue Agent: He's a former Panamanian military Colonel who joins in on the continent-wide anti-U.S. uprising triggered by Ontiveros.
  • Wolfpack Boss: Colonel Alvaro is a standard infantry unit and is armed only with a pistol; however, he's camped out behind a building at the rear of his main base with several rebel infantrymen protecting him.

    Predator 

The Ghosts

Alpha Team

A group of 8 Ghosts under the command of Colonel Scott Mitchell who are sent into Sri Lanka to investigate the massacre of several U.S. mining ships. They consist of Parker, Stiles, Bill, John, Sgt. Wayland, Sgt. Mike Garcia, Jordan, and Ramirez.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Garcia seems to be this, given his dialogue in the opening movie.
  • Flat Character: The Ghosts in Predator receive even less characterization than those from previous games, only having any real dialogue in the opening and ending movies.
  • The Hero: Unlike the Scott Mitchell games, Predator doesn't have a main character per se, since you can select any of the 8 Ghosts for any position in your squad, and you can also switch between controlling any of your 3 squad members in-game. However, Parker seems to be the closest since he's the default Ghost 1 and is slightly more prominent in the ending cutscene.
  • One Steve Limit: Averted; Parker and Ramirez share the same names as two prominent Ghosts from the Scott Mitchell games, but are not the same characters. Parker is clearly a separate character due to being a young white dude rather than an older black guy, and Ramirez's bio lists him as being at least a decade younger than Joe Ramirez would be in the timeframe that Predator takes place.

Allies

Mister Hisan

A local police chief and the leader of the Mumpuri Guard, a non-political militia formed to protect the civilian populace from the various warring factions attempting to gain control of the nation.

President Dersha

The President of Sri Lanka, whose government is under threat from a variety of warring factions.
  • Our Presidents Are Different: Very much President Target; not only is his government being contested by multiple armed factions, but he gets kidnapped by the Loyalist faction and has to be rescued by the Ghosts towards the end of the game.

Antagonists

Kumara Fazal

Known as "The Teacher", he is the leader of the People's Action Front (also known as the Activists) and espouses violent revolution to address the nation's perceived economic inequality.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: The Ghosts note that the Activists are a rag-tag bunch of goons, many of which have had only a couple weeks of training at best. Mitchell finds it hard to believe these chuckleheads could have managed the attacks on the U.S. ships. He's right.
  • Dirty Communists: Not explicitly stated, but his rhetoric heavily suggests this.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: You kill him about 1/3rd of the way through the game. Then the Loyalists show up.
  • Evil vs. Evil: The Teacher was dead set against an alliance with the Loyalists, which prompt the Loyalists to conspire to get rid of the Teacher so they could absorb the Activists.
  • Not Me This Time: The Activists are legitimately violent terrorists who take civilian hostages and terrorize the populace, but it turns out they were framed for the attacks on the U.S. ships.
  • Wolfpack Boss: The Teacher is a standard infantry unit and only guarded by a couple of soldiers. However, once you get rid of him and his men, well-equipped Loyalist troops will swarm your position as You Have Outlived Your Usefulness.

Dilip Khan

A former member of the Activists, Khan is the C.I.A.'s informant in Sri Lanka who identifies Fazal as the person responsible for the massacre of the U.S. miners. It turns out he's actually a double agent for the Loyalists, and falsely accused Fazal so the Ghosts would eliminate him, clearing the way for the Activists to be absorbed by the Loyalists.
  • Dirty Coward: He folds like a busted flush the moment you catch up to him, and Mister Hasan easily pressures him into recording a confession to turn the Activists against the Loyalists.
  • Double Agent: The C.I.A. think he's a defector from the Activists informing on them. He's actually a member of the Loyalists tricking the C.I.A. so that the Americans will bump off the Teacher for them.

Sunil Ranga

The former Minister of Energy, Ranga is secretly the leader of the Loyalists, a much more well-equipped and professionally military group compared to the rag-tag Activists.
  • Bald of Evil: Has male pattern baldness and is the game's Big Bad.
  • Big Bad: Of Predator.
  • False Flag Operation: After The Teacher refuses to join him, he concocts a scheme to attack U.S. ships and frame the Activists so American agents will kill the Teacher for him.
  • Fat Bastard: Is a portly businessman in a suit who's the game's Big Bad.
  • The Starscream: He's one of President Dersha's cabinet members, who seems to have decided he'd rather be running the country himself and has bankrolled a paramilitary group to achieve that.
  • Wolfpack Boss: He's a fairly standard combatant armed with an assault rifle and accompanied by a couple Loyalist soldiers. You also have to fight your way through a mansion full of Loyalist guards to get to him.

    Ghost Recon Wii 

The Ghosts

Bravo Team

Bravo Team consists of Captain Hibbard and Lt. Booth, a pair of Army Rangers who participated in the U.S. invasion of Russia-occupied Norway and who were selected to be inducted into the Ghosts based on their performance in that fighting. Bravo Team is sent into Moscow to help clear the way for a full-scale U.S. assault, with their primary target being General Maxim Cherskiy, the commanding officer of the Ultranationalists' special forces.
  • Art Shifted Sequel: Because Wii is based on an earlier draft of Future Soldier, the armor worn by Hibbard and Booth is much more futuristic and sci-fi compared to that worn by the Ghosts in the final version of Future Soldier. In fact it strongly resembles the armor worn by CELL soldiers in the Crysis series.
  • Badass Baritone: Captain Hibbard has a really deep voice.
  • Color-Coded Characters: Captain Hibbard wears a black armor suit with yellow highlights while Lt. Booth wears a white armor suit with blue highlights.

Allies

Major Maltsev

A Russian Loyalist officer currently undercover inside the Ultranationalist camp.

Antagonists

General Maxim Cherskiy

The commanding officer of the Ultranationalists' special forces and the General in charge of the Ultranationalists' defense of Moscow. He serves as the main antagonist of the game.
  • Bald of Evil: Completely bald with a grey goatee.
  • Dark Is Evil: Wears an all-black uniform.
  • Dirty Coward: Spends the entire second half of the final level running away from Bravo Team while making no attempt to fight back. Granted, in real life, when dealing with assassins, general officers are supposed to seek shelter and let their soldiers handle the problem, rather than personally 1v1-ing every asshole that comes gunning for them.
  • Disney Villain Death: Bravo Team shoot him off the roof of his headquarters before he can board an escape helicopter.
  • Elite Mooks: He's the commanding officer of the Ultranationalists' special forces, and is protected by a few dozen Gas Mask Mook Spetznaz soldiers who are noticeably tougher and more maneuverable than regular Mooks.
  • Made of Iron: Downplayed, but he can survive about as many bullets as his Spetznaz Elite Mooks, despite not wearing heavy body armor like they are.

    Shadow Wars 

The Ghosts

Duke

Class: Commando
A special forces officer who is the leader of the Ghost squad.

Haze

Class: Sniper
A long established member of the ghosts, Haze tend to be the voice of reason and is the squad's second in command.
  • Cold Sniper
  • The Lancer
  • Token Minority: The only Asian in the squad.
  • The Spock: He favors whatever gets the mission done fast. In one mission, he preferred not to rescue the hostages despite pleading from the escaped security guard.

Richter

Class: Gunner
Transferred from the Green Berets, Richter tend to be the Fun Personified in the squad and likes to poke fun at the new recruits.

Saffron

Class: Medic
A former Navy Medic who became the Ghost squad's medic.

Banshee

Class: Recon
A loner who became a Recon

Mint

Class: Engineer
The newest recruit for the ghosts.

Ghost Lead

The leader of all Ghost squads and directs the squad's missions. He was a former Ghost.
  • Mission Control: Gives you your orders at the beginning of each mission.
  • No Name Given: He's only ever referred to as Ghost Lead; also, despite being in charge of the Ghosts and seeming to be familiar with the events of Ghost Recon 2: Summit Strike, he doesn't seem to actually be Scott Mitchell, as he refers to Scott as a separate character at one point.
  • Voice with an Internet Connection: As part of being Mission Control.

Allies

Aydana Kozlova

Class: Assault
A Kazakh commando the Ghosts encounter.
  • Action Girl
  • Continuity Nod: She's the sister of Grigoriy Kozlov from Ghost Recon 2: Summit Strike. The Ghosts suspect she might blame them for her brother's death, but this turns out not to be the case, though she might still have some ill will towards Scott Mitchell.
  • Demolitions Expert: As the game's only Assault class unit, she specializes in grenades as well as rifles.
  • Double Reverse Quadruple Agent: She presents herself as a Kazakh commando, but is actually a Russian agent working for President Karkarzev. As a result she prevents the Ghosts from capturing Demidov so she can follow him to locate the remaining Dead Hand Bases. However, ultimately she and the Ghosts have the same goals in the conflict; stopping Zemya and Strashin.
  • Guest-Star Party Member: She's not one of your six permanent Ghost squad members, and can't be upgraded like they can, but still fights alongside them for a significant portion of the game.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: At the end of the game she stays behind to manually detonate the base's nuclear reactor and blow up Strashin's missiles before they can destroy the world, while giving the Ghosts time to escape.
  • Scarf Of Asskicking: Has a long red one. It appears in The Stinger hanging out of an escape hatch, possibly implying that she survived her Heroic Sacrifice.
  • Sixth Ranger Traitor: Subverted.
  • Stripperiffic: Although you only see her head in-game, her character art which shows her full body shows she's fighting in nothing more than a green halter-top and jeans while the Ghosts are fighting in full body armor (though this somewhat makes sense as she's an irregular resistance fighter while the Ghosts are fully equipped military). For the final set of missions she puts on a more sensible winter outfit, most likely to deal with the cold Siberian weather.

Antagonists

Vladimir Morozov

Strashin's right hand man; a ruthless mercenary who leads Zemya's attacks.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking: He's got about 3 times as much health as his Mooks; overall his health is on par with that of your Ghost teammates.
  • The Brute: He's described as a large and ruthless man.
  • Dark Is Evil: Dresses all in black.
  • The Dragon: To General Strashin.
  • Kick the Dog: He repeatedly tests the Dead Hand combat drones out on civilians, for no reason other than it's convenient.
  • Mildly Military: He has a more informal, mercenary-like appearance, compared to the more paramilitary uniforms worn by the regular Zemya troopers.
  • Wolfpack Boss: When you finally face him, he's hold up in a command room with several Mooks.

Yaroslav Demidov

A Russian scientist from "the old times" who controls the old Soviet-era Dead Hand Bases that contain decommissioned but still functional combat drone production facilities as well as nuclear missiles. He's also a member of the defunct Russian Royalty, and joined Treskayev and Strashin because he was promised that the monarchy would be restored under their rule.
  • Aristocrats Are Evil: Though much milder than most examples.
  • Blue Blood: A descendant of the Romanovs. How he ended up in charge of the Dead Hand bases under Soviet rule is anyone's guess, though he likely concealed his heritage.
  • Death Equals Redemption: After Strashin goes completely off the deep end and pulls a You Have Outlived Your Usefulness on him, Demidov uses his dying breath to warn the Ghosts and give them the intel they need to stop Strashin from blowing up the planet.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: He was repulsed when Morozov decided to leave his troops to their deaths. In general, he didn't like all the violence done by Zemya but only put up with it because they promised him that they will return the monarchy to Russia.
  • Mecha-Mooks: His control of the Dead Hand Bases gives him access to an army of combat drones, which is why Strashin and Treskayev ally with him in the first place.
  • Non-Action Guy: He's a scientist in a suit, not a soldier, and every time you encounter him he promptly runs away from you.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: At the end of the game, Strashin shoots him and leaves him to bleed out before setting out to destroy the world. Even before that, Treskayev made it clear early on he was only using Demidov to get access to the Dead Hand Bases and their robot factories, and that Demidov would outlive his usefulness once Treskayev was actually in power.

General Strashin

A Russian General working for Yuri Treskayev, he's also the leader of Zemya and wants to take over Russia.
  • Ax-Crazy: With a generous helping of maniacal laughter.
  • Big Bad: The main villain of Shadow Wars.
  • Duel Boss: Strashin retracts a series of bridges in order to cut off the Ghosts from him, forcing Aydana to fight him one-on-one while the Ghosts battle his security drones (though you can still actually snipe him from the other platforms with the Ghosts).
  • The Man Behind the Man: Morozov and Demidov are the public face of Zemya, but Strashin is the one secretly in charge while publicly acting as the commanding officer of the Russian military task force that's supposed to be dealing with the chaos being caused by Zemya.
  • Omnicidal Maniac: The Big Bad pulling a Taking You with Me with nuclear weapons after their initial plan falls apart is something that happens Once per Episode in the Ghost Recon series, but Strashin is the only Big Bad whose goal at the end is explicitly to destroy the world; the North Korean Generals and Mexican rebels from earlier games at least had somewhat more strategic plans for their usage of nukes.
  • Renegade Splinter Faction: After being accidentally outed by Demidov as the real leader of Zemya, Strashin flees Moscow and activates an army of robot drones to try and take over the country.
  • The Starscream/Evil Is Not a Toy: He turns against Treskayev and tries to take over Russia with a secret robot army.
  • Taking You with Me: When on the verge of defeat, he tries to blow up the planet with the Dead Hand Doomsday Device.
  • Unwitting Pawn: If Zemya is the same as the un-named separatist terrorist group from H.A.W.X. 2, then they're just pawns being played to create a crisis so Treskayev/Makhmudov can seize power. Strashin himself seems to either realize this, or is simply too insane to control, as he eventually turns into The Starscream.
  • Wolfpack Boss: Strashin himself is a pretty standard infantry unit and armed only with a pistol, but he's got a bunch of security drones and heavy turrets protecting him.

Yuri Treskayev

An ultranationalist politician who hired Strashin and Morozov to destabilize Russia and her neighbors so that he can be elected over the more moderate incumbent President.
  • Arc Villain: Of Shadow Wars, Ghost Recon Wii, Future Soldier, and H.A.W.X. 2, assuming the Evil Chancellor in all 4 games is the same character.
  • Bald of Evil: Has male pattern baldness and is the Greater-Scope Villain.
  • Evil Is Not a Toy: He's completely shocked when General Strashin goes rogue and tries to take over the country with a robot army.
  • Karma Houdini: Yuri loses his bid to become President, but returns to his former position in the Duma and faces no major consequences for his schemes. If he is the same person as the Big Bad of H.A.W.X. 2 and Future Soldier, then he does finally get his comeuppance in those games.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: Of Shadow Wars, as well as Ghost Recon Wii. Is also most likely meant to be the same person as the Big Bad of H.A.W.X. 2 and Future Soldier.
  • Sudden Name Change: He seems to be meant to be the same person as Aleksandr Treskayev from H.A.W.X. 2 and Ghost Recon Wii as well as Sergey Makhmudov from Future Soldier; all 3 have the exact same character model (down to his distinct green tie) and story-wise are the same character in every detail except name. The differences are likely due to miscommunication between the 4 studios making the 4 games as well as the two year delay in the development of Future Soldier due to its Troubled Production.
Advertisement:

    Future Soldier 

The Ghosts (Hunter team)

John Kozak

A second-generation Russian-American from Brooklyn and the main protagonist of Future Soldier, who serves as Hunter team's scout/point man/tech expert. Kozak was recruited into the Ghosts for his prodigy-like expertise with advanced technology; Major Scott Mitchell, now the commanding officer of the Ghosts, once referred to him as the future of soldiers.
  • The Cameo: A younger, New Meat Kozak appears prominently in the "Silent Spade" missions of Ghost Recon: Wildlands which were added as Year Two extra content.
  • Contrasting Sequel Main Character: Unlike Captain Mitchell from the previous games, Kozak is just the team's scout/pointman rather than the actual team leader. As a result he can't give movement orders to the rest of the squad, though he can call out enemy targets.
  • Cunning Linguist: Speaks Russian quite fluently, which comes in handy when the Ghosts are secretly helping loyalist Russians.
  • Odd Name Out: He's the only squad member who goes by his real name rather than by a callsign.
  • Player Character: Of Future Soldier.
  • Title Drop: He's the protagonist of Future Soldier, and in Ghost Recon: Wildlands Colonel Mitchell refers to the tech-savvy Kozak as the future of soldiers, as compared to more old-school ground-pounders like Mitchell and Nomad.
  • The Smart Guy: Handles all the tech in the squad, including use of the drone.
  • Token Enemy Minority: Kozak is the son of Russian immigrants. This comes up on occasion, mostly as teasing from 30K, but also by way of having Kozak interrogate a captured member of Bodark, relay messages in Russian to a loyalist general they're secretly assisting, and going solo on a covert mission to rescue the Russian president.

Ghost Lead

The leader of Hunter Team and a highly professional career soldier.

Pepper

Hunter Team's level-headed sniper.
  • Badass Baritone: Has a very gravelly voice, which contrasts quite a bit with 30K's easy-going drawl.
  • Bald of Awesome: Has a shaved head.
  • Cold Sniper: The team sniper and generally quite the professional.
  • Fluffy the Terrible: He's a badass special forces sniper named after a condiment.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: He's calm and collected in contrast to the more boisterous and hot-blooded 30K.

30K

Hunter Team's talkative, boisterous support gunner and driver.

The Ghosts (others)

Scott Mitchell

see the character folder for Ghost Recon 2.

Twistings

  • Getaway Driver: She's usually the pilot for Hunter team's extraction helicopter.

Allies

Volodin

  • Off-Model: His character portrait in the mission briefing screens looks almost nothing like his in-game character model. His character portrait is that of a scowling, heavyset bald man while his in-game appearance looks completely different. This is true of many characters in the game and likely a symptom of its Troubled Production.
  • President Action: When rescued by Kozak and given a weapon, he's more than capable of fighting alongside the Ghost.
  • Sudden Name Change: Appears to be the same person as President Karkarzev in Shadow Wars and President Karskazev in H.A.W.X. 2. All 3 have the exact same character model and are the moderate President of Russia opposed by Big Bad Makhmudov/Treskayev.

Antagonists

Raven's Rock

A powerful group of hardline Russian ultranationalists who want to take over Russia.
  • Arc Villain: President Makhmudov is this for Shadow Wars, Ghost Recon Wii, Future Soldier, and H.A.W.X. 2, assuming the Evil Chancellor in all 4 games is meant to be him.
  • Bad Boss: In the final level, almost every single surviving Raven's Rock leader has a Kick the Dog moment before you kill them; one argues with and starts choking his wife, one is torturing a captured prisoner, one is yelling at and mistreating one of his Mooks, etc. Granted, they're all likely highly stressed due to the defeat of their coup and the fact they're being forced to flee into hiding.
  • Bald of Evil: Makhmudov and Petrakov have this.
  • The Conspiracy: They're planning on overthrowing the Russian government and appear to be made up of a number of very influential power players, including at least 3 Generals, an Admiral, and a number of politicians and other incredibly wealthy individuals, as well as arms dealers, a considerable portion of the military, and an elite special forces group.
  • Continuity Nod: The enemy soldiers in Ghost Recon Wii have the same character model as the Raven's Rock soldiers in Future Soldier.
  • Evil Gloating: Petrakov taunts the Ghosts and even mocks the death of their comrades even after being shot by them and seconds from them putting a bullet in his head, such is his confidence that his political connections make him untouchable. And he turns out to be right. Too bad for him he dies anyway.
  • Flat Character: The first time you see any of the Raven's Rock leaders is mere seconds before you blow them away. Also, only President Makhmudov and Petrakov have any real dialogue.
  • Greater-Scope Villain:
    • If President Makhmudov is supposed to be the same person as Yuri Treskayev in Shadow Wars and Aleksandr Treskayev in Ghost Recon Wii and H.A.W.X. 2, then he and Raven's Rock is this to those three games.
    • The implication of the ending of H.A.W.X. 2 is that Raven's Rock themselves are being controlled by Megiddo from Splinter Cell. Future Soldier is not as closely tied to H.A.W.X. 2 as it originally was supposed to be, so the only trace of this plotline left in the final game is the mysterious order from "the highest level" not to capture Petrakov, the final Raven's Rock leader.
  • Meaningful Name: Their name appears to be taken from a famous battle fought against Western crusaders by proto-Russian prince Alexander Nevsky, who was made into a prominent folk hero by Soviet-era propaganda.
  • Minor Crime Reveals Major Plot: A dirty bomb bound for the United States that kills 4 Ghosts isn't exactly a "minor" crime, but what looks like a random terrorist bombing ultimately leads to a massive conspiracy to take over one of the 3 most powerful nations on Earth.
  • Murder by Inaction/Exact Words: At the end of the game, the Ghosts receive a mysterious order "from the highest level" to let Petrakov go, which they ultimately obey even as he taunts them about the death of their comrades caused by Raven's Rock. Too bad for Petrakov, he's currently injured and laying in the path of an oncoming train, and just because the Ghosts can't kill him doesn't mean they have to save him...
  • Off-Model: A common occurrence for many characters in Future Soldier, likely due to the game's Troubled Production.
    • The character portrait for General Burkharov during the mission briefing screens looks completely different from his in-game character model as well as the character portrait on your HUD when you kill him. In the mission briefings he has a European appearance while his in-game model and the HUD portrait that accompanies it has a much more Turkic appearance.
    • Many of the Raven's Rock leaders in the final level look nothing like their character portraits.
    • Petrakov, the final Raven's Rock leader, looks a good couple of decades older and considerably balder than his character portrait, though this can at least be chalked up to the intel photo being significantly outdated.
  • President Evil: President Sergey Makhmudov, the new President of Russia after Raven's Rock take over the country. It's unclear whether he's the actual leader of Raven's Rock or if Petrakov and the other conspirators in the final level are The Man Behind the Man. Though taking Future Soldier, Shadow Wars, Ghost Recon Wii, and H.A.W.X. 2 as a whole, then Makhmudov is indeed meant to be the Big Bad.
  • Renegade Russian: They're a group of Russian hardline ultranationalists who plan (and succeed in) overthrowing the current Russian government and engaging in a war with the West.
  • Sigil Spam: Their emblem, a set of four interlocking black "hooks" inside a red diamond, is plastered everywhere under their control.
  • Sudden Name Change: President Makhmudov is apparently supposed to be the same person as Aleksandr Treskayev from H.A.W.X. 2 and Ghost Recon Wii and Yuri Treskayev from Ghost Recon: Shadow Wars. All 3 have the exact same character model (down to his distinct green tie) and story-wise are the same character in every detail except name. The differences are likely due to miscommunication between the 4 studios making the 4 games as well as the two year delay in the development of Future Soldier due to its Troubled Production.
  • Suicidal Overconfidence: They seem to either believe that they can win a nuclear war with the West or that NATO lacks the spine to actually retaliate with their own nuclear weapons; either position seems suicidally stupid to anyone with even a basic understanding of international nuclear politics (though, given it is the year 2024, they may simply be taking Prime Minister Corbyn at his word).
  • Western Terrorists: Before fully taking control of Russia, they're engaged in attempting to cause mass casualty events in the West, including sending a dirty bomb to the U.S.-Mexico border and launching a nuclear missile at London.
  • Wolfpack Boss: While the citizens of Moscow deal with President Makhmudov themselves, the Ghosts storm the headquarters of Raven's Rock's military leader General Mikhail Burkharov to stop him from organizing an armed crackdown against the protesters. After you fight through his remaining Bodark Elite Mooks, Burkharov holes up in his office with about a dozen guards. You blast your way in and blow them all away. Burkharov himself takes cover behind his desk while wielding an assault rifle, and goes down just like any of his Mooks.
  • 0% Approval Rating:
    • Their support amongst the populace appears to be absolutely abysmal, and in the second-to-last level the civilian population of Moscow forms a mob and kicks them out of office (with a little help from the Ghosts who make sure Raven's Rock are unable to hold onto power by force). It's likely the Russian populace remember what an abysmal failure the last hardline ultranationalist government was from the original Ghost Recon.
    • In Ghost Recon Wii, after Bravo Team is captured by the Ultranationalists, one of the Russian soldiers holding them prisoner shoots his partner and sets the Ghosts free, telling them that President Treskayev/Makhmudov is a madman tearing Russia apart and must be stopped no matter what.

Bodark

A dangerous, highly trained Russian special forces group whose skill and equipment are on par with that of the Ghosts themselves.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking: Averted; their leader Colonel Kuzmin and the other 3 Bodark officers who are your targets in the final mission of the Raven Strike DLC behave more like regular infantry than the Elite Mooks under their command. They're not even protected by Bodark spec ops, just regular Raven's Rock soldiers. All 4 Bodark officers are at least competent fighters, compared to the Raven's Rock leaders who were largely noncombatants.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • Their uniforms and equipment are a DLC pack for Ghost Recon: Phantoms. Also, the Russian Spetznaz unit in Tom Clancy's Endwar is known as the Wolves.
    • They're mentioned in Wildlands as having been paid to provide combat training to Cartel underboss La Plaga.
    • The Wolves from Breakpoint also seem to greatly resemble them, as well as share their name (Bodark means Werewolf in Russian).
  • Elite Mooks: Even more elite than previous Elite Mook groups in the series such as North Korean special forces, Aguila 7, or the Panamanian mercs.
  • Evil Counterpart: To the Ghosts, much more-so than previous Elite Mooks like Aguila 7. Like the Ghosts, they're an elite special forces group utilizing state-of-the-art technology (including cloaking devices and EMP grenades), and like the Ghosts they're named after a supernatural being. Their technological parity with the Ghosts also lets them hack the Ghosts' own tech systems, crippling the Ghosts' usual technological advantage. Their Leitmotif is even titled "Nemesis" in the game's soundtrack. They're also the only enemy group in the series who know exactly who the Ghosts are (even referencing Kozak by name and hometown) and what their capabilities are.
  • Gas Mask Mooks: They wear gas masks, possibly due to their usage of smoke grenades.
  • Kung Fu-Proof Mook: They can't be marked on your cross-com like regular enemies due to their thermoptic camo. Also, unlike the earlier prototypes used by Los Extranjeros, the camo doesn't show up in thermal vision either.
  • Leitmotif: "Nemesis", a combination of Ominous Russian Chanting and ''Psycho'' Strings. The heavy combat version, "Stampede", replaced the Ominous Chanting with Dubstep.
  • Mage Killer: In their first appearance, they hack your cross-com systems to disable all your fancy high-tech gadgets, including your optic camo, drone, and cross-com HUD.
  • Nothing Is Scarier: In the first mission in which you encounter them, they spent a large portion of the mission simply trolling you, hacking your cross-com so that it glitches heavily and even shows enemies that aren't actually there. It's only when you walk into an ideal kill-zone relatively late in the level do they actually engage you in combat.
  • Savage Wolves: They take their name from Russian folklore; a Bodark is a man who chooses to become a Werewolf, as opposed to someone who involuntarily becomes a werewolf due to being bitten by one.
  • The Starscream: In the Raven Strike DLC, after Raven's Rock is overthrown, Colonel Kuzmin and Bodark attempt to use the chaos to steal all of Russia's intelligence secrets, either for their own personal use or to sell on the open market.
  • Visible Invisibility: Their thermoptic camo has the same Predator shimmer effect as that of the Ghosts. However, when combined with the fact they can't be marked on your cross-com, it can still let them sneak up on you surprisingly effectively as you're so used to the cross-com marking enemies for you that you fail to notice them.
  • Wolfpack Boss: Each of the Bodark officers in the final mission of Raven Strike are no tougher than a regular Mook, but are protected by at least a couple squads of troopers as well as one APC each.
Top

Example of:

/

Feedback