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** As an alternate interpretation of "The Woman's Prize", if "Shrew" is viewed as a comedy/caricature of a domineering woman getting her comeuppance done for comedy, "Prize" could be seen as doubly funny for having the man get his comeuppance in a similar way (especially given male/female roles at the time).


*** Another FairForItsDay interpretation would note that there were other contemporary plays in this genre (taming a bad wife), only they solved the problem by [[DomesticAbuser beating the wife into submission]]. You know, [[ValuesDissonance comedy]]! Shakespeare's version doesn't seem that bad in comparison...

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*** Another FairForItsDay interpretation would note that there were other contemporary plays in this genre (taming a bad wife), only they solved the problem by [[DomesticAbuser [[DomesticAbuse beating the wife into submission]]. You know, [[ValuesDissonance comedy]]! Shakespeare's version doesn't seem that bad in comparison...



** Surprisingly, both male and female readers, viewers and audience members have viewed Kate as a woman who needs to learn humility. To be fair, they have a point; at one stage Kate hits a music teacher over the head with a lute simply because he told her she played some notes wrong and tried to show her how to do them properly, and at another stage she strikes Petruchio just for making a crude - but fairly benign - joke about her

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** Surprisingly, both male and female readers, viewers and audience members have viewed Kate as a woman who needs to learn humility. To be fair, they have a point; at one stage Kate hits a music teacher over the head with a lute simply because he told her she played some notes wrong and tried to show her how to do them properly, and at another stage she strikes Petruchio just for making a crude - but fairly benign - joke about herher.


* ValuesResonance: Modern series such as the ''[[Literature/FiftyShadesOfGray Fifty Shades]]'' and ''Submissive'' trilogies (written in the 21st century by women) also tell the story of a domineering man turning a woman into his submissive, and [[AllGirlsWantBadBoys some]] modern female readers apparently love them. The play also pre-dates the S&M fantasy (or at least the recognition thereof) with its dominant vs. submissive roles by several centuries.

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* ValuesResonance: Modern series such as the ''[[Literature/FiftyShadesOfGray ''[[Literature/FiftyShadesOfGrey Fifty Shades]]'' and ''Submissive'' trilogies (written in the 21st century by women) also tell the story of a domineering man turning a woman into his submissive, and [[AllGirlsWantBadBoys some]] modern female readers apparently love them. The play also pre-dates the S&M fantasy (or at least the recognition thereof) with its dominant vs. submissive roles by several centuries.


* FairForItsDay: Many complain about the ending, but in historical context Shakespeare was writing in a time when women were just beginning to be treated like ''human beings'' rather than the property of men. The character of Kate was pushing the boundaries of what was acceptable in society, so some agree that Shakespeare added the themes of female submissiveness to appease his audience.

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* FairForItsDay: Many complain about the ending, but in historical context Shakespeare was writing in a time when women were just beginning to be treated like ''human beings'' rather than the property of men. The character of Kate was pushing the boundaries of what was acceptable in society, so some agree that Shakespeare added the themes of female submissiveness to appease his audience. That having been said, the example of "The Woman's Prize (The Tamer Tamed)" suggests that less than a decade after Shakespeare's death the play was already starting to look outdated[[note]]while it is not known ''when'' exactly "The Woman's Prize" was written, it must have been before 1625 as the known writer died that year[[/note]].

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** Rather than being "tamed" by Petruchio's bullying ways, could it be that Kate is ''charmed'' by it that she genuinely finds him lovable for being a man after her own heart, nagging, and unpleasant, and boorish someone who doesn't flee from her outbursts but instead answers in kind, and with spirit, too? It is possible to stage the play with both obviously having fun during their initial rows. (As for the later part, the ending speech is easily filed away as her playing along to win both of them the wager's money.)

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* BigLippedAlligatorMoment: The Induction can certainly come off as this. While such framing devices were actually quite fashionable when the play was written, Shakespeare's is unique in that it doesn't have a conclusion, doesn't inform the rest of the play in any easily discernible way, and disrupts the classic five-act structure the Bard usually adhered to so strictly. Many modern productions [[AdaptedOut leave it out completely.]]


** Surprisingly, both male and female readers, viewers and audience members have viewed Kate as a woman who needs to learn humility. To be fair, they have a point; at one stage Kate hits a music teacher over the head with a lute simply because he told her she played some notes wrong, and at another stage she strikes Petruchio just for making a crude - but fairly benign - joke about her

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** Surprisingly, both male and female readers, viewers and audience members have viewed Kate as a woman who needs to learn humility. To be fair, they have a point; at one stage Kate hits a music teacher over the head with a lute simply because he told her she played some notes wrong, wrong and tried to show her how to do them properly, and at another stage she strikes Petruchio just for making a crude - but fairly benign - joke about her


** It is also possible to read Kate's final speech as (a) a TakeThat to women who have been making her life miserable for years by vaunting her superior wifely virtue. And (b) really intended for Petruchio. The burden of her speech is that men love their wives and work for their benefit, she is telling her new husband that she understands why he's behaved the way he has to her and accepts, even welcomes, the lesson and his affection. The message is received: "Kiss me, Kate!"


* ValuesResonance: Modern series such as the ''Fifty Shades'' and ''Submissive'' trilogies (written in the 21st century) also tell the story of a domineering man turning a woman into his submissive, and ''[[FemaleMisogynist some]]'' modern female readers apparently love them.
%%* WhyWouldAnyoneTakeThemBack

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* ValuesResonance: Modern series such as the ''Fifty Shades'' ''[[Literature/FiftyShadesOfGray Fifty Shades]]'' and ''Submissive'' trilogies (written in the 21st century) century by women) also tell the story of a domineering man turning a woman into his submissive, and ''[[FemaleMisogynist some]]'' [[AllGirlsWantBadBoys some]] modern female readers apparently love them.
%%* WhyWouldAnyoneTakeThemBack
them. The play also pre-dates the S&M fantasy (or at least the recognition thereof) with its dominant vs. submissive roles by several centuries.

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** There is also an interpretation which plays up the FramingDevice where the story is actually a play ''[[PlayWithinAPlay in-universe]]'', and one presumably being performed by male actors for a male audience. In this interpretation, the fact that no real woman has ever responded to things in the way that Kate does is the ''point'', and the joke is that the play is absurd but the guy it's being put on for is too dumb to notice.

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* UnintentionallySympathetic: even some of Shakespeare's contemporaries felt the treatment of Katharina was a bit harsh. This is even more prominent among modern readings, with Kate being popularly interpreted as an abuse victim.


** That brutality wasn't spared on Petruchio either. There was some pretty physical wrestling going on between the two during the meeting scene. We're talking full-on headlocks and leg holds, like she was trying to crush his head between her thighs while hanging sideways off his neck.

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** *** That brutality wasn't spared on Petruchio either. There was some pretty physical wrestling going on between the two during the meeting scene. We're talking full-on headlocks and leg holds, like she was trying to crush his head between her thighs while hanging sideways off his neck.

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** That brutality wasn't spared on Petruchio either. There was some pretty physical wrestling going on between the two during the meeting scene. We're talking full-on headlocks and leg holds, like she was trying to crush his head between her thighs while hanging sideways off his neck.


* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: There is a theory that Kate doesn't genuinely submit to Petruchio but is putting on an act and merely becomes shrewd to get her way with her husband. Supporting this is how Kate doesn't gradually become submissive but, almost in exasperation, just starts agreeing with him in a completely unrealistic way, and [[SilkHidingSteel this behavior gets Petruchio to do what]] ''she'' wants. (Thus learning the very lesson he's trying to teach: one catches more flies with honey than with vinegar.)
** Another one: Petruchio is lampooning society (specifically gender roles) throughout the play; the "taming" is really him trying to get Kate to play along with him without having to drop the joke by telling her in front of other people. (Crucial bit to reading this: in that scene where Kate starts to go along with him, "moon" and "sun" are metaphors for Petruchio).
*** Actually "moon" and "sun" are a MetaJoke, based on the fact that all plays were performed under the open sky at mid afternoon and there were no or very few props and as such any of the things lighting and props do today were done by "word scenery", i.e. the characters setting the setting. This leads to people saying "AsYouKnow it is quite dark". Shakespeare toying with this here shows that indeed, his work makes it so. LeaningOnTheFourthWall, indeed.

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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:
**
There is a theory that Kate doesn't genuinely submit to Petruchio but is putting on an act and merely becomes shrewd to get her way with her husband. Supporting this is how Kate doesn't gradually become submissive but, almost in exasperation, just starts agreeing with him in a completely unrealistic way, and [[SilkHidingSteel this behavior gets Petruchio to do what]] ''she'' wants. (Thus learning the very lesson he's trying to teach: one catches more flies with honey than with vinegar.)
** Another one: Petruchio is lampooning society (specifically gender roles) throughout the play; the "taming" is really him trying to get Kate to play along with him without having to drop the joke by telling her in front of other people. (Crucial bit to reading this: in that scene where Kate starts to go along with him, "moon" and "sun" are metaphors for Petruchio).\n*** Actually "moon" and "sun" are a MetaJoke, based on the fact that all plays were performed under the open sky at mid afternoon and there were no or very few props and as such any of the things lighting and props do today were done by "word scenery", i.e. the characters setting the setting. This leads to people saying "AsYouKnow it is quite dark". Shakespeare toying with this here shows that indeed, his work makes it so. LeaningOnTheFourthWall, indeed.

Added DiffLines:

***Actually "moon" and "sun" are a MetaJoke, based on the fact that all plays were performed under the open sky at mid afternoon and there were no or very few props and as such any of the things lighting and props do today were done by "word scenery", i.e. the characters setting the setting. This leads to people saying "AsYouKnow it is quite dark". Shakespeare toying with this here shows that indeed, his work makes it so. LeaningOnTheFourthWall, indeed.

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