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* NightmareFuel: Petruchio psychologically wearing down his bride Katherine, as evidenced by the title. She's DeniedFoodAsPunishment and subjected to a SleepDeprivationPunishment and even TwoPlusTortureEqualsFive! Her speech at the end, urging women to submit to their husbands, demonstrates how fully Petruchio has crushed her spirit. The worst part is that, though more recent performances have acknowledged the horror of what Katherine goes through (for example, by depicting playing up the BrokenBird angle during her final monologue), [[ValuesDissonance more traditional versions play the whole thing for laughs!]]

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* NightmareFuel: Petruchio psychologically wearing down his bride Katherine, as evidenced by the title. She's DeniedFoodAsPunishment and subjected to a SleepDeprivationPunishment and even TwoPlusTortureEqualsFive! TwoPlusTortureMakesFive! Her speech at the end, urging women to submit to their husbands, demonstrates how fully Petruchio has crushed her spirit. The worst part is that, though more recent performances have acknowledged the horror of what Katherine goes through (for example, by depicting playing up the BrokenBird angle during her final monologue), [[ValuesDissonance more traditional versions play the whole thing for laughs!]]

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* NightmareFuel: Petruchio psychologically wearing down his bride Katherine, as evidenced by the title. She's DeniedFoodAsPunishment and subjected to a SleepDeprivationPunishment and even TwoPlusTortureEqualsFive! Her speech at the end, urging women to submit to their husbands, demonstrates how fully Petruchio has crushed her spirit. The worst part is that, though more recent performances have acknowledged the horror of what Katherine goes through (for example, by depicting playing up the BrokenBird angle during her final monologue), [[ValuesDissonance more traditional versions play the whole thing for laughs!]]


* WTHCastingAgency: An example that isn't one specific piece of casting, but the entire basis of a production. A fairly recent show of Shrew GenderBent the entire cast. For some this was an interesting take on the gender roles, but for others, basing the whole show around this concept didn't allow the production to truly embrace the subversive nature of other modern productions.

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* WTHCastingAgency: An example that isn't one specific piece of casting, but the entire basis of a production. A fairly recent show of Shrew GenderBent gender bent the entire cast. For some this was an interesting take on the gender roles, but for others, basing the whole show around this concept didn't allow the production to truly embrace the subversive nature of other modern productions.

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* BrokenBase: Is the play sexist, or is it commenting on sexism? Regardless of how it was intended when written, any decent modern production will aim to represent it as the latter, using whatever subversive methods necessary.


Added DiffLines:

* WTHCastingAgency: An example that isn't one specific piece of casting, but the entire basis of a production. A fairly recent show of Shrew GenderBent the entire cast. For some this was an interesting take on the gender roles, but for others, basing the whole show around this concept didn't allow the production to truly embrace the subversive nature of other modern productions.

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** While Petruchio starts out merely wanting a wife for money, he can be played as genuinely falling for Katherine. Indeed, Creator/RaulJulia played heavily into this opposite Creator/MerylStreep.


* MagnificentBastard: Petruchio

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** Surprisingly, both male and female readers, viewers and audience members have viewed Kate as a woman who needs to learn humility. To be fair, they have a point; at one stage Kate hits a music teacher over the head with a lute simply because he told her she played some notes wrong and tried to show her how to do them properly, and at another stage she strikes Petruchio just for making a crude - but fairly benign - joke about her.


** Of course, one key difference between Fifty Shades and this story is that the former has consent - arguably dubious consent but still consent - while the latter does not.

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** Of course, one key difference between Fifty Shades and this story is that the former has consent - arguably dubious consent but still consent - while the latter does not. A woman agreeing to be a submissive and a woman being forced into it is quite different

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** Of course, one key difference between Fifty Shades and this story is that the former has consent - arguably dubious consent but still consent - while the latter does not.


** Another one: It's a FamilyUnfriendlyAesop ("It's only okay to be rude to people if they're weaker than you are," which is essentially the lesson Kate learns in the end) PlayedForLaughs.

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** Another one: It's a FamilyUnfriendlyAesop SpoofAesop ("It's only okay to be rude to people if they're weaker than you are," which is essentially the lesson Kate learns in the end) PlayedForLaughs.end).


* UnintentionallySympathetic: even some of Shakespeare's contemporaries felt the treatment of Katharina was a bit harsh. This is even more prominent among modern readings, with Kate being popularly interpreted as an abuse victim.

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* UnintentionallySympathetic: even Even some of Shakespeare's contemporaries felt the treatment of Katharina was a bit harsh. This is even more prominent among modern readings, with Kate being popularly interpreted as an abuse victim.


* FairForItsDay: Many complain about the ending, but in its historical context, the character of Kate was pushing the boundaries of what was acceptable female behavior in society. Therefore, some agree that Shakespeare added the themes of female submissiveness to appease his audience. That being said, the example of "The Woman's Prize (The Tamer Tamed)" suggests that less than a decade after Shakespeare's death the play was already starting to look outdated[[note]]while it is not known ''when'' exactly "The Woman's Prize" was written, it must have been before 1625 as the known writer died that year[[/note]].

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* FairForItsDay: Many complain about the ending, but in its historical context, the character of Kate was pushing the boundaries of what was acceptable female behavior in society. For comparison, most contemporary plays would deal with an unruly wife by simply having the husband [[DomesticAbuse beat her senseless]] for the amusement of the audience. Therefore, some agree that Shakespeare added the themes of female submissiveness to appease his audience. That being said, the example of "The Woman's Prize (The Tamer Tamed)" suggests that less than a decade after Shakespeare's death the play was already starting to look outdated[[note]]while it is not known ''when'' exactly "The Woman's Prize" was written, it must have been before 1625 as the known writer died that year[[/note]].


* FairForItsDay: Many complain about the ending, but in historical context Shakespeare was writing in a time when women were just beginning to be treated like ''human beings'' rather than the property of men. The character of Kate was pushing the boundaries of what was acceptable in society, so some agree that Shakespeare added the themes of female submissiveness to appease his audience. That having been said, the example of "The Woman's Prize (The Tamer Tamed)" suggests that less than a decade after Shakespeare's death the play was already starting to look outdated[[note]]while it is not known ''when'' exactly "The Woman's Prize" was written, it must have been before 1625 as the known writer died that year[[/note]].

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* FairForItsDay: Many complain about the ending, but in its historical context Shakespeare was writing in a time when women were just beginning to be treated like ''human beings'' rather than context, the property of men. The character of Kate was pushing the boundaries of what was acceptable female behavior in society, so society. Therefore, some agree that Shakespeare added the themes of female submissiveness to appease his audience. That having been being said, the example of "The Woman's Prize (The Tamer Tamed)" suggests that less than a decade after Shakespeare's death the play was already starting to look outdated[[note]]while it is not known ''when'' exactly "The Woman's Prize" was written, it must have been before 1625 as the known writer died that year[[/note]].


** The alternate alternate character interpretation is that Shakespeare means what he says and that attempts to read the play as "subversive" are a product of the modern audience's discomfort with the story.
** And for that matter, the alternate alternate alternate character interpretation (whew!) is that Shakespeare was being sexist but FairForItsDay, because Kate's last speech does not say only "wives submit to your husbands" but rather "wives submit to your husbands ''because they have your best interests at heart''"
*** Another FairForItsDay interpretation would note that there were other contemporary plays in this genre (taming a bad wife), only they solved the problem by [[DomesticAbuse beating the wife into submission]]. You know, [[ValuesDissonance comedy]]! Shakespeare's version doesn't seem that bad in comparison...



** Surprisingly, both male and female readers, viewers and audience members have viewed Kate as a woman who needs to learn humility. To be fair, they have a point; at one stage Kate hits a music teacher over the head with a lute simply because he told her she played some notes wrong and tried to show her how to do them properly, and at another stage she strikes Petruchio just for making a crude - but fairly benign - joke about her.



** Kate sometimes comes across as a bully to her younger sister. This results, in what appears to be, Petruchio giving her a taste of her own medicine.

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** As an alternate interpretation of "The Woman's Prize", if "Shrew" is viewed as a comedy/caricature of a domineering woman getting her comeuppance done for comedy, "Prize" could be seen as doubly funny for having the man get his comeuppance in a similar way (especially given male/female roles at the time).

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