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*** Part of it became this once fans discovered that the majority of his team have terrible movesets[[note]]Rhydon's entire moveset (no STAB moves, Leer and Tail Whip lowers the same stat, Fury Attack is a weak multi-hit attack, and Horn Drill might as well be useless if its opponent is faster), Pidgeot's Whirlwind and Arcanine's Roar not working against non-wild Poké back then, and Exeggutor who has ''three'' moves, two of which being low-damaging non-STAB moves[[/note]]. His [[GameBreaker Alakazam]] and starter however is generally considered difficult to beat and is one of the reasons why players had a hard time against him back in the day. While his ''Yellow'' team have slightly better movesets they're generally inferior to his ''Red'' and ''Blue'' team. With the existence of new, better moves and abilities in Gen III, the remakes are kind enough to buff up his entire team.

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*** Part of it became this once fans discovered that the majority of his team have terrible movesets[[note]]Rhydon's entire moveset (no STAB moves, Leer and Tail Whip lowers the same stat, Fury Attack is a weak multi-hit attack, and Horn Drill might as well be useless if its opponent is faster), Pidgeot's Whirlwind and Arcanine's Roar not working against non-wild Poké Pokémon back then, and Exeggutor who has ''three'' moves, two of which being low-damaging non-STAB moves[[/note]]. His [[GameBreaker Alakazam]] and starter however is generally considered difficult to beat and is one of the reasons why players had a hard time against him back in the day. While his ''Yellow'' team have slightly better movesets they're generally inferior to his ''Red'' and ''Blue'' team. With the existence of new, better moves and abilities in Gen III, the remakes are kind enough to buff up his entire team.


*** Part of it became this once fans discovered that the majority of his team have terrible movesets[[note]]Rhydon's entire moveset (no STAB moves, Leer and Tail Whip lowers the same stat, Fury Attack is a weak multi-hit attack, and Horn Drill might as well be useless if its opponent is faster), Pidgeot's Whirlwind and Arcanine's Roar not working against non-wild Poké back then, and Exeggutor who has ''three'' moves, two of which being a low-damaging non-STAB moves.[[/note]]. His [[GameBreaker Alakazam]] and starter however is generally considered difficult to beat and is one of the reasons why players had a hard time against him back in the day. While his ''Yellow'' team have slightly better movesets they're generally inferior to his ''Red'' and ''Blue'' team. With the existence of new, better moves and abilities in Gen III, the remakes are kind enough to buff up his entire team.

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*** Part of it became this once fans discovered that the majority of his team have terrible movesets[[note]]Rhydon's entire moveset (no STAB moves, Leer and Tail Whip lowers the same stat, Fury Attack is a weak multi-hit attack, and Horn Drill might as well be useless if its opponent is faster), Pidgeot's Whirlwind and Arcanine's Roar not working against non-wild Poké back then, and Exeggutor who has ''three'' moves, two of which being a low-damaging non-STAB moves.[[/note]].moves[[/note]]. His [[GameBreaker Alakazam]] and starter however is generally considered difficult to beat and is one of the reasons why players had a hard time against him back in the day. While his ''Yellow'' team have slightly better movesets they're generally inferior to his ''Red'' and ''Blue'' team. With the existence of new, better moves and abilities in Gen III, the remakes are kind enough to buff up his entire team.


*** Part of it became this once fans discovered that the majority of his team have terrible movesets. His [[GameBreaker Alakazam]] and starter however is generally considered difficult to beat and is one of the reasons why players had a hard time against him back in the day. While his ''Yellow'' team have slightly better movesets they're generally inferior to his ''Red'' and ''Blue'' team. With the existence of new, better moves and abilities in Gen III, the remakes are kind enough to buff up his entire team.

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*** Part of it became this once fans discovered that the majority of his team have terrible movesets.movesets[[note]]Rhydon's entire moveset (no STAB moves, Leer and Tail Whip lowers the same stat, Fury Attack is a weak multi-hit attack, and Horn Drill might as well be useless if its opponent is faster), Pidgeot's Whirlwind and Arcanine's Roar not working against non-wild Poké back then, and Exeggutor who has ''three'' moves, two of which being a low-damaging non-STAB moves.[[/note]]. His [[GameBreaker Alakazam]] and starter however is generally considered difficult to beat and is one of the reasons why players had a hard time against him back in the day. While his ''Yellow'' team have slightly better movesets they're generally inferior to his ''Red'' and ''Blue'' team. With the existence of new, better moves and abilities in Gen III, the remakes are kind enough to buff up his entire team.


* PopularityPolynomial: Gen I has always been the most popular ''Pokémon'' generation, but as later games refined the core mechanics, general consensus was that it became [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny more and more dated]] over time, even with the BrokenBase over ''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl''. However, starting in Gen V and even moreso in Gen VI onwards, ''Pokémon'' games caught more significant controversy over their creative decisions and gameplay, with the games becoming [[ItsEasySoItSucks easier]], more linear and story-based, and overcomplicating the Pokédex and game mechanics. With the release of Gen I on the Virtual Console, some fans newly appreciated how it was the least "hand-holdy" generation and had a fair bit of challenge behind it, and how it delivers the core ''Pokémon'' experience with very familiar Pokémon without causing controversy over the additon/removal of any new feature.

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* PopularityPolynomial: Gen I has always been the most popular ''Pokémon'' generation, but as later games refined the core mechanics, general consensus was that it became [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny more and more dated]] over time, even with the BrokenBase over ''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl''. However, starting in Gen V and even moreso in Gen VI onwards, ''Pokémon'' games caught more significant controversy over their creative decisions and gameplay, with the games becoming [[ItsEasySoItSucks easier]], more linear and story-based, and overcomplicating the Pokédex and game mechanics. With the release of Gen I on the Virtual Console, some fans newly appreciated how it was the least "hand-holdy" generation and had a fair bit of challenge behind it, generation, and how it delivers the core ''Pokémon'' experience with very familiar Pokémon without causing controversy over the additon/removal of any new feature.



* ItsEasySoItSucks: A criticism some had with ''Yellow''. Even though the game suffers a bit from EarlyGameHell, you're eventually given access to all three Kanto starters very early in the same game. In addition to Blue having a slightly more weaker team, the levels of various enemy Pokemon being curved, and the patched up imbalances, more than a few fans have felt that these aspects made the game more easy than it should have been.[[note]]That being said, this is balanced out by the fact that all the gym leaders after Misty have higher leveled teams (for example, Sabrina has a level 50 Alakazam in ''Yellow'', whereas in ''Red'' and ''Blue'', her Alakazam was only at level 43).[[/note]]

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* ItsEasySoItSucks: A criticism While a lot of people have memories of the Gen 1 games being more difficult than future Pokemon games, probably due to having played the games as young children when they were much less proficient at the games, others have pointed out how they are possibly the easiest games, despite some had EarlyGameHell. The first big problem is the AI or rather the lack of it; all trainers will pick moves at complete random, leading to things like Koga using Self-Destruct with ''Yellow''. Even though his Weezing when it's his last pokemon, and Agatha constantly trying to use Dream Eater when your pokemon is awake. The exception is if the game suffers trainer has the "good AI" flag such as with Gym Leaders, in which case if they have a bit from EarlyGameHell, you're eventually given access move with super-effective typing against you, they'll only use such moves, even if their "super-effective" move ''isn't a damaging move'', leading to all three Kanto starters very early things like Lance's dragons only using Agility/Barrier if faced with a Poison or Fighting type pokemon. Then the AI will send out their pokemon in the same game. In addition to Blue order every time regardless of matchup. The second big problem is how in Red/Blue all trainers don't have proper movesets for their pokemon, they just use the last four moves their pokemon would naturally learn at their level as if they were wild pokemon, while even the Gym Leaders and Elite Four are like this except for their ace pokemon having a slightly more weaker team, their trademark TM move, leading to them having really bad movesets lacking type coverage and even strong STAB moves late in the levels game. This is especially apparent with Lance and Champion Blue; the former only has the long obsoleted Dragon Rage and Normal moves for his damaging attacks outside of various enemy Pokemon his Gyarados' Hydro Pump, so once his Gyarados is down he can't touch Ghost and Rock pokemon, while the latter has things like a Rhydon with only basic Normal moves, an Arcanine with Ember as its only STAB move, and an Exeggutor with its only damaging moves being curved, Normal and not having even a full moveset. Yellow addressed the patched up imbalances, more than a few fans have felt that these aspects moveset issue some and actually made an effort to give boss trainers some semblance of a competent moveset, Lance for example now has plenty of type coverage on his Dragons, but they're still mostly lackluster. Then you factor in how the game more easy than it should have been.[[note]]That being said, this is balanced out by player can actively abuse the fact that easily-exploited AI, the severe imbalances in Gen 1, and all the gym leaders after Misty have higher leveled teams (for example, Sabrina has a level 50 Alakazam in ''Yellow'', whereas in ''Red'' glitches, and ''Blue'', her Alakazam was only at level 43).[[/note]]as a result you can beat these games very easily even when extremely under-levelled and doing an extreme SelfImposedChallenge.



*** Part of it became this once fans discovered that the majority of his team have lackluster movesets. His [[GameBreaker Alakazam]] and starter however is generally considered difficult to beat and is one of the reasons why players have a hard time against him back in the day. While his ''Yellow'' team have slightly better movesets they're generally inferior to his ''Red'' and ''Blue'' team. With the existence of new, better moves and abilities in Gen III, the remakes are kind enough to buff up his entire team.

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*** Part of it became this once fans discovered that the majority of his team have lackluster terrible movesets. His [[GameBreaker Alakazam]] and starter however is generally considered difficult to beat and is one of the reasons why players have had a hard time against him back in the day. While his ''Yellow'' team have slightly better movesets they're generally inferior to his ''Red'' and ''Blue'' team. With the existence of new, better moves and abilities in Gen III, the remakes are kind enough to buff up his entire team.



** Misty's Starmie is effectively almost guaranteed to be faster and stronger than anything you will have at that point and it does very high damage even for mons that resist Water. In ''[=FireRed=]'' and ''[=LeafGreen,=]'' her Starmie has switched Bubble Beam for Water Pulse which confuses you about once every three turns it's used.
** Sabrina at Gen 1. Her team of Psychic-type Pokémon is fifteen to eighteen (depending on which version you're playing) levels higher than the last Gym Leader. It doesn't help much that Psychic-types were also [[GameBreaker extremely overpowered]] in Gen I due to a glitch making them immune rather than weak to Ghost, contrary to in-game advice and Nintendo's own guides, and a [[FakeBalance poorly-balanced elemental system]] in which Psychic's only weakness, Bug, had lackluster Pokémon and moves. To rub salt in the wound, the only Ghost-types at the time were also part-Poison, creating a vulnerability to Psychic moves. Thank goodness this has been fixed in the remakes.
** Lance’s Dragonite in ''Yellow''. In ''Red'' and ''Blue'', it wasn’t significantly problematic, apart from knowing Barrier, which Dragonite has [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard never been able to learn]]. [[note]]Until 2016, when it finally gets to learn Barrier legally... at least, the event Dragonite that are in themselves a reference to Lance's Dragonite.[[/note]] Not here. Got a Water-type that knows an Ice move, the Dragon type’s only weakness? It knows Thunder. An actual Ice-type? It knows Fire Blast. A Rock- or Ground-type Pokémon who knows a good Rock-type move, since Dragonite is part-Flying and therefore vulnerable to Rock moves? It is physically tanky enough to shrug it off and knows Blizzard. Get ready for a tough fight.

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** Misty's Starmie is effectively almost guaranteed to be faster and far stronger and faster than anything you will have at that can reasonably obtain by the point you fight her without severe over-levelling besides Nidoking and it does very high damage even for mons Nidoqueen, who are much slower and at a type-disadvantage, while Bubblebeam is also a strong move this early in the game. Even pokemon that resist Water. Water can be hit hard by it, while not even dealing much damage back with super-effective Grass/Electric moves with Starmie's significantly higher Special stat. And the fact it only has three moves works in the terrible Gen 1 AI's favor, as it increases the chance that Misty will use Bubblebeam instead of something much worse. The saving grace against her is that Starmie's other moves are the much weaker Bubble and the completely ineffectual Tackle, which she is just as likely to randomly use instead of Bubblebeam, and she may waste turns using X Defend instead even when you have a Special-based attacker out. In ''[=FireRed=]'' and ''[=LeafGreen,=]'' her Starmie has switched Bubble Beam for Water Pulse Pulse, which is slightly weaker but now confuses you about once every three turns it's used.
** Sabrina at Gen 1. Her team of Psychic-type Pokémon is fifteen
used, and her Starmie has Recover to eighteen (depending heal itself, while you can no longer rely on which version you're playing) levels higher than her bad AI randomly using bad moves or wasting turns with X Defend. However with the last Gym Leader. It doesn't help much that Psychic-types were also [[GameBreaker extremely overpowered]] in Gen I due to a glitch making them immune rather than weak to Ghost, contrary to in-game advice and Nintendo's own guides, and a [[FakeBalance poorly-balanced elemental system]] in which Psychic's only weakness, Bug, had lackluster Pokémon and moves. To rub salt in the wound, the only Ghost-types at the time were also part-Poison, creating a vulnerability to Psychic moves. Thank goodness this Special split post-Gen 1 Starmie has been fixed substantially less Special Defense, so in the remakes.
FRLG her Starmie can't tank Grass/Electric moves as well.
** Lance’s Dragonite in ''Yellow''. In ''Red'' and ''Blue'', it wasn’t significantly problematic, apart from knowing Barrier, which threatening at all, as with its only damaging moves being Hyper Beam and Dragon Rage, it really couldn't touch Ghost and Rock pokemon while not being much threatening to other pokemon, and half the time it will waste turns with Agility/Barrier boosts that probably won't do anything to help, while you can also exploit his AI with a Poison or Fighting pokemon and get him stuck only using Agility/Barrier (most famously demonstrated in TwitchPlaysPokemon where the Twitch chat was able to beat his Dragonite has [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard never been able with a level 20ish Venomoth as it got poisoned and then kept trying to learn]]. [[note]]Until 2016, when boost itself with Agility/Barrier until it finally gets to learn Barrier legally... at least, the event Dragonite that are in themselves a reference to Lance's Dragonite.[[/note]] Not here.fainted). In Yellow it was massively improved however, as Agility, Barrier, and Dragon Rage were replaced with Thunder, Fire Blast, and Blizzard. Got a Water-type that knows an Ice move, the Dragon type’s only weakness? It knows Thunder. An actual Ice-type? It knows Fire Blast. A Rock- or Ground-type Pokémon who knows a good Rock-type move, since Dragonite is part-Flying and therefore vulnerable to Rock moves? It is physically tanky enough to shrug it off and knows Blizzard. Get ready Blizzard, while every Rock pokemon in Gen 1 has a second type weak to Ice except for the Omastar and Kabutops line. It is still slow however, so as long as you have a tough fight.pokemon with a strong Ice move that outspeeds it or can take a hit, you can still easily one shot it unless you're really underlevelled.


** Golduck fares horribly compared to other Water-types in Kanto. It has stiff competition from Starmie and Gyarados, who the former is already considered one of the best Water-types in the game. Gyarados, too, has a high physical attack stat, and also, its special stat is good as well. Golduck also lacks a StatusBuff move, meaning it will not have any help from its meager base 80 special stat.


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** Golduck fares horribly compared to other Water-types in Kanto. It has stiff competition from Starmie and Gyarados, who the former is already considered one of the best Water-types in the game. Gyarados, too, has a high physical attack stat, and also, its special stat is good as well. Golduck also lacks a StatusBuff move, meaning it will not have any help from its meager base 80 special stat.


** Fighting and Poison overall, and not just for being weak to the game-breaking Psychic-type. While Fighting is good against the common Normal-type, this can be easily be offset by having a Psychic or Ghost teammate to counter them. It doesn't help that Fighting-types in this generation tend to have too shallow movepools to do anything else [[note]]the only Fighting Pokémon that can really get any use is Hitmonlee. Although its defense is low, Hitmonlee has fairly decent speed and attack plus a pretty good movepool[[/note]]. The other type Fighting has an advantage against is Rock, which are few in number while being easily countered by Water, Ground and Grass. Poison-types on the other hand tend to have mediocre stats and are outclassed in terms of countering Grass-types as other types do that better and can fit into other roles as well.

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** Fighting and Poison overall, and not just for being weak to the game-breaking Psychic-type. While Fighting is good against the common Normal-type, this can be easily be offset by having a Psychic or Ghost teammate to counter them. It doesn't help that Fighting-types in this generation tend to have too shallow movepools to do anything else [[note]]the only Fighting Pokémon that can really get any use is Hitmonlee. Although its defense is low, Hitmonlee has fairly decent speed and attack plus a pretty good movepool[[/note]]. The other type Fighting has an advantage against is Rock, which are few in number while being easily countered by Water, Ground and Grass. Poison-types on the other hand tend to have mediocre stats and are outclassed in terms of countering Grass-types as other types do that better and can fit into other roles as well. Even worse, Poison-types lack any strength in their attacking moves: Sludge has a weak 65 base power.


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** Golduck fares horribly compared to other Water-types in Kanto. It has stiff competition from Starmie and Gyarados, who the former is already considered one of the best Water-types in the game. Gyarados, too, has a high physical attack stat, and also, its special stat is good as well. Golduck also lacks a StatusBuff move, meaning it will not have any help from its meager base 80 special stat.


** Fighting and Poison overall, and not just for being weak to the game-breaking Psychic-type. While Fighting is good against the common Normal-type, this can be easily be offset by having a Psychic or Ghost teammate to counter them. It doesn't help that Fighting-types in this generation tend to have too shallow movepools to do anything else. The other type Fighting has an advantage against is Rock, which are few in number while being easily countered by Water, Ground and Grass. Poison-types on the other hand tend to have mediocre stats and are outclassed in terms of countering Grass-types as other types do that better and can fit into other roles as well.

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** Fighting and Poison overall, and not just for being weak to the game-breaking Psychic-type. While Fighting is good against the common Normal-type, this can be easily be offset by having a Psychic or Ghost teammate to counter them. It doesn't help that Fighting-types in this generation tend to have too shallow movepools to do anything else.else [[note]]the only Fighting Pokémon that can really get any use is Hitmonlee. Although its defense is low, Hitmonlee has fairly decent speed and attack plus a pretty good movepool[[/note]]. The other type Fighting has an advantage against is Rock, which are few in number while being easily countered by Water, Ground and Grass. Poison-types on the other hand tend to have mediocre stats and are outclassed in terms of countering Grass-types as other types do that better and can fit into other roles as well.


* CasualCompetitiveConflict: In the remakes, actively, as the third generation is when Website/{{Smogon}} was founded. In the originals, retroactively, as analyses of later games had sparked a renewed interest in the older games (though there was never much interest [[FakeBalance because the competitive

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* CasualCompetitiveConflict: In the remakes, actively, as the third generation is when Website/{{Smogon}} was founded. In the originals, retroactively, as analyses of later games had sparked a renewed interest in the older games (though there was never much interest [[FakeBalance because of the competitive FakeBalance.



* ThatOneAttack:

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** As far as the three starters are concern, Blastoise has a cult status compared to the other two. While most will agree that Blastoise is not the best competitively, there is very little criticism regarding itself as many find an armor turtle with cannons to be badass unlike Venusaur's divisive look and being the rival to Charizard without the WolverinePublicity criticism plaguing it. Some would find it very refreshing for the main protagonist to start with Squirtle since it's the only starter that was not picked as the first for any of Red's appearances.

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** Before the Rival battle in Pokémon Tower, he says: "Your Pokémon don't look dead! I can at least make them faint!" Flash forward to the popularization of FinalDeath runs, particularly the [[SelfImposedChallenge Nuzlocke challenge]], and the line goes straight from [[{{Jerkass}} general jerkassery]] to a DeadlyEuphemism, with a possible side of KickThemWhileTheyAreDown if you'd lost one of your Pokémon recently.

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** If you get stopped by the Youngster on the way out of Pewter City and then save and restart the game between the text box closing and him dragging you off (doable by moving the cursor over "Save" beforehand and closing his text box with B rather than A), he'll disappear temporarily and you can leave the city without [[ButThouMust having to beat Brock first]]. Furthermore, if you perform certain prerequisites and then speak to the Youngster from the right (something that's impossible without cheats or glitches), you get the ability to walk through walls.


* FranchiseOriginalSin: [[FranchiseOriginalSin/{{Pokemon}} Shares a page with the rest of the franchise.]]



* FranchiseOriginalSin:
** Mew is the first Mythical Pokémon -- [[TemporaryOnlineContent Pokémon only available for a limited time, often during one-off real-life events]]. Being a long-running and behind-the-times ScrappyMechanic, this sin has many layers:
*** The use of real-life events to distribute Mew was necessary because it wasn't originally intended to be in the game at all, and was only slipped into a vacant data slot at the last moment. As such, real life events and taking advantage of GoodBadBugs were the only way to get it. Each new generation of games introduced at least one new mythical Pokemon. All of them were hardcoded into their debut games from the outset, so unlike Mew, the difficulty in obtaining these Pokemon is purely arbitrary. In many ways, Mew and its successors were a frightening precursor to the dreaded practice of "[[DownloadableContent on-disk DLC]]".
*** Because [=Wi-Fi=] obviously didn't exist yet, going to a physical location was the only legitimate way of getting Mew. Over twenty years later, one-time in-person events still persist, which are inaccessible to many fans, especially younger ones, due to location or lack of transport. Digital distribution is much more common these days, but these events are still typically open for a limited time only and never return. Also, where Mew could be encountered via GoodBadBugs no matter the time period, no such bugs exist for the later Mythicals (ironic, since said bugs were precisely why discussion and rumours about Mew spread at all).
*** Mew was given to players directly, often wth a set OT and ID number; there was no (deliberate) in-game event that let you catch it since, well, you weren't meant to. Starting with ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'', however, most Mythicals are similarly directly distributed without any fanfare or in-game event. Not only is there no skill in getting them as with Legendary Pokémon, but players often can't use them in a main playthrough due to coming at a high level in addition to having a different OT. Owing to [[PurposelyOverpowered their banned status in postgame facilities]], these Mythicals often [[BraggingRightsReward just gather dust as glorified trophies]].
** Later games in the franchise have been [[ItsEasySoItSucks criticized for being too easy]], but it was actually ''Yellow'' that started the trend of making the campaign easier for the player. ''Yellow'' gives the player access to all three Kanto starters, alters move sets to increase type coverage,[[note]]Charizard for instance could finally learn Fly[[/note]] and adds some [[CrutchCharacter Crutch Pokemon]] early on to make Brock's gym battle more accessible. To be fair, ''Yellow''[='s=] midgame is more difficult than ''Red/Blue''[='s=] (Erika is in the level 30 range, while Koga/Sabrina jump to level ''50''). Also, making Brock's battle easier was arguably necessary because Pikachu is simply not viable against Rock/Ground types, who can NoSell its Electric moves and resist its Normal ones.
** Some Pokémon can only evolve [[SocializationBonus when traded to other players]]. While annoying and tedious then, the ones introduced in this generation and [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver the next]] improve greatly on their pre-evolutions and are powerful options both in-game and competitively. Later trade evolutions would only get worse, from only evolving when traded for a specific Pokémon, to holding a specific item while being traded. While the introduction of the GTS in later games made getting trade evos considerably easier, getting the ones that need to be holding items was, ''and still is'', nearly impossible for several reasons.
** Many later Pokemon games have also been criticised for having little in the way of a postgame, especially the ones in Gens VI and VII. However, this started back with these games, where the only thing you ever unlocked for beating the game was the Cerulean Cave BonusLevel with Mewtwo, as well as the option to view the teams you beat the Elite Four with at any PC. This was acceptable back then (especially given how the next two generations added a whole seperate region and multiple new battle facilities respectively), but doesn't really hold up too well now when other Pokemon games go the same route.
** The Japanese ''Blue'' version and the later ''Yellow'' version marked the start of the tradition of [[UpdatedRerelease releasing an upgraded and improved version of the previous two games]], often with an altered story focusing on a new mascot legendary (though the latter didn't start until ''Crystal''). Though liked at the time, it didn't escape people's notice that this rendered a generation's first pair of games redundant "beta versions" for the perceived "true" experience (which even averted OneGameForThePriceOfTwo).[[note]]This became very obvious with ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'', which had [[ObviousBeta numerous bugs, a poorly-paced story, and questionable game design]]; all issues mostly fixed with the ''Platinum'' version. ''VideoGame/PokemonXAndY'' were also designed as such, but without any UpdatedRerelease version to solve their own issues.[[/note]] By the time ''VideoGame/PokemonUltraSunAndUltraMoon'' brought the concept back after a nine-year absence, they attracted more criticism [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks for being largely the same as the games released only one year prior]], and by then fans were more accustomed to [[VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2 sequels]] and remakes of older games. The rise of online services and other games receiving digital patches and DownloadableContent to fix bugs and add more story (as opposed to releasing a totally new product for full price) didn't help their case.



* FranchiseOriginalSin: The beginning of ''[=FireRed=] and [=LeafGreen=]'' is far more tutorial heavy than prior games, with it assuming it's a player's first ''Pokémon'' game. Thankfully, it eases up after leaving Viridian City, but it's here where peoples' complaints about [[VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon later games]] being hand-holding to the point of annoyance all started.


* AlternateCharacterInterpretation:
** The rival (Blue) has several.
*** Your rival is actually the hero, and you're either the real {{Jerkass}} or some kind of [[LackOfEmpathy uncaring]] unstoppable force. The "Dead Raticate" theory (which posits that the Raticate he uses in early battles isn't in his later encounters because it died from injuries attained in battle) often plays a big part in this. Granted, it requires some [[EpilepticTrees big assumptions]] (such as his post battle dialogue[[note]]"How's your [=POKéDEX=] coming, pal? I just caught a CUBONE! I can't find the grown-up MAROWAK yet! I doubt there are any left! Well I better get going! I've got a lot to accomplish, pal! Smell ya later!"[[/note]]) and doesn't change the fact that he acts like a {{Jerkass}} towards you.
*** On the other hand, some fans go the other way and suggest your rival was actually a member of Team Rocket. He's implied to have taken the Nugget Bridge challenge which was a recruitment for the team, and he probably got the same offer to join you did, but he never brings it up to you or warns you about it. Most damning, later in the game he shows up in Silph Co. in a room right outside Giovanni's, and his post-battle dialogue has him acknowledge Giovanni is here. Why would your rival infiltrate Silph Co. occupied by Team Rocket and wait right outside his room to battle you, unless he's become TheDragon? In this theory, his conquest of Pokémon League was a back-up plan by Team Rocket to TakeOverTheWorld using his status. Further evidence of his membership can even be found in ''Gold'' and ''Silver'', where for no given reason he's suddenly in command of Giovanni's gym.
*** Another interpretation to explain the rival's appearance in Silph Co. is that he's an idiot who somehow got himself stuck in the building when he tried to take on Team Rocket before the player arrived on the scene. The rival claiming that he showed up at Silph Co. just to battle the player was only an excuse to try to hide any embarrassment of being rescued.
** Professor Oak has had a few theories devised about him over the years. The first type of theory is that he's a GeniusDitz who understands Pokémon but is too stupid to keep all the data about them (or, indeed, remember his own grandson's name), hence why you have to recollect all of it. The second kind of theory puts him in a somewhat more malevolent light, either as having some illegal ties to the various villain teams or as the ManBehindTheMan of the franchise. Some have also suggested that he is having affair with the player character's mother, and sends a ten-year-old child out into the world on his own to prevent him finding out.
** One theory posits that Team Rocket's end goal all along was attempting to defeat and subdue Mewtwo. They looked to recruit powerful trainers that could face it (see Nugget Bridge), tried to resurrect powerful extinct Fossil Pokemon at Mt. Moon, took the Silph Scope to capture Ghost-types in Pokémon Tower that could trump it, hoped to steal/mass-produce the Master Ball to capture and control it, and Giovanni crafted a TM [[OneHitKO that could defeat it instantly]] as a last resort. Considering how Giovanni has control over Mewtwo in ''VideoGame/PokemonUltraSunAndUltraMoon'', [[HilariousInHindsight maybe the theorists were onto something]].
** Sabrina is in cahoots with Team Rocket in the takeover of the Saffron City. She conveniently set up a Gym next to the pre-existing one and crushed them. During the player's journey, her gym is closed during the invasion of Silph Co. until Team Rocket was taken down. This interpretation has led to her actually being a high-ranking member of Team Rocket in ''Manga/PokemonAdventures''.
** For a much more minor example, see WhatAnIdiot! below.



* CommonKnowledge:
** Two things people know about Red; he's ten years old, and he's a completely SilentProtagonist. Both of these are incorrect; the manual gives Red's age as eleven (though his counterpart Ash [[NotAllowedToGrowUp being perpetually ten years old]] in the [[Anime/{{Pokemon}} animé]] doesn't help), and there are moments where he's implied to speak (such as when talking to Copycat).
** Thanks to AdaptationDisplacement and changes in translation, many believe that Mewtwo was created by several scientists, and it's not too hard to find people who believe said scientists were part of Team Rocket. In truth, not only does Team Rocket have nothing to do with Mewtwo in the games, but the original Japanese text for the Pokémon Mansion journals is written in the first person, and Mewtwo's Pokédex entry in both languages only mentions one scientist creating it, meaning Mewtwo was a wholly independent project.
** Professor Oak is [[MemeticMutation commonly mocked]] for being unable to tell if the player is a boy or a girl, though he only did this in the remakes and ''[[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver HeartGold/SoulSilver]]'' - this never happened in ''Red/Blue'' due to gender not being an option. He's not even the first professor to ask the question; when gender became an option in ''Crystal'', he never asked it (it being asked by a nondescript voice instead), and the first time a professor asked it, it was Professor Birch in ''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire''.
** Giovanni is often seen as [[VillainWithGoodPublicity a well-respected Gym Leader who secretly moonlights as a crime boss]]. However, only the reverse is true; several [=NPCs=] openly identify Giovanni as the leader of Team Rocket, while the identity of the Viridian City Gym Leader is a complete mystery to them. [[AdaptationalVillainy Having several other Gym Leaders as his subordinates]] in ''Manga/PokemonAdventures'' are part of the factors that contributed to this idea
** Many memes have been made about how expensive things are in the games - such as potions for "300 Pokédollars" or having to pay 200 Pokédollars for a bottle of water. This is actually because it's a {{Woolseyism}} for "円", which is the Kanji for ''Yen''. The in-game currency is based off of Yen, ''not'' the "Dollar" like the US, Canadian, or Singapore dollar. Ergo, adding a decimal (Which Japan doesn't really use, [[ValuesDissonance due to their number system favouring whole numbers as much as possible]]) results in $3.00 potions, $2.00 bottles of water, or selling gold nuggets for $50.



* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Missingno. is either a unique and interesting Pokémon if handled correctly or a horrifying abomination that will destroy your game (note that it does not actually do this, but it will corrupt Hall of Fame data).



* CasualCompetitiveConflict: In the remakes, actively, as the third generation is when Website/{{Smogon}} was founded. In the originals, retroactively, as analyses of later games had sparked a renewed interest in the older games (though there was never much interest [[FakeBalance because the competitive balance was terrible]]).
* CommonKnowledge:
** Because of the TCG grouping some types together and the misrepresentation of some of the ElementalRockPaperScissors in the anime, it is common to assume that Rock is immune to Electric instead of Ground, not helping that the most common Rock-types encountered in Gen I (the Geodude, Onix, and Rhyhorn families) are part-Ground. Only five Rock-type Pokémon, the generation's five Fossil Pokémon (in which only one appeared as an enemy, owned by Lance), were vulnerable to Electric.
** Ice also gets a similar reaction back in the older days, as some fans assumed that Ice shares the same strengths and weaknesses as Water and Water/Ice is also a common type combination in Gen I (shared by Dewgong, Cloyster, and Lapras). Notably, Fire didn't resist Ice until Generation II.

to:

* CasualCompetitiveConflict: In the remakes, actively, as the third generation is when Website/{{Smogon}} was founded. In the originals, retroactively, as analyses of later games had sparked a renewed interest in the older games (though there was never much interest [[FakeBalance because the competitive balance was terrible]]).
* CommonKnowledge:
** Because of the TCG grouping some types together and the misrepresentation of some of the ElementalRockPaperScissors in the anime, it is common to assume that Rock is immune to Electric instead of Ground, not helping that the most common Rock-types encountered in Gen I (the Geodude, Onix, and Rhyhorn families) are part-Ground. Only five Rock-type Pokémon, the generation's five Fossil Pokémon (in which only one appeared as an enemy, owned by Lance), were vulnerable to Electric.
** Ice also gets a similar reaction back in the older days, as some fans assumed that Ice shares the same strengths and weaknesses as Water and Water/Ice is also a common type combination in Gen I (shared by Dewgong, Cloyster, and Lapras). Notably, Fire didn't resist Ice until Generation II.



* FandomEnragingMisconception: Do NOT call Red "Ash" on a Pokémon forum. It will not be pretty. Not helped by Nintendo materials calling the trainer and the rival with the same names from the anime, before they got the names of Red and Green/Blue in [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver Generation II]].
** And they will not accept that Ash and Gary were one of three stock names (of which Red and Blue were also options) you could give to the player character and the rival respectively.

to:

* FandomEnragingMisconception: Do NOT call Red "Ash" on a Pokémon forum. It will not be pretty. Not helped by Nintendo materials calling the trainer and the rival with the same names from the anime, before they got the names of Red and Green/Blue in [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver Generation II]].
** And they will not accept that Ash and Gary
II]], because those were one of three stock names (of which Red and Blue were also options) you could give to in the player character and the rival respectively.original games.

Added DiffLines:

* DefaultSettingSyndrome: The games have a number of game settings that your average fan has probably never used, and may not even know exist. These include options for speeding up the text speed, turning off battle effects (move animations, weather, status effect animations, etc.), and changing the "battle style" closer to how it is in PVP. All typically speed up the pace of the game, especially battles, but few players ever actually change them because it makes the games feel uncomfortably different.


** Tentacruel, which can be encountered while surfing on any ocean route. Their unevolved form, Tentacool, are much more fitting as GodDamnBats thanks to their abilities to both confuse and poison your Pokémon, as well as prevent you from fleeing or switching them out with the trapping move Wrap. The trouble is that Tentacruel can appear in the exact same places. It can be quite a shock to go from battling Tentacool with levels in the high-teens to suddenly staring down a level 40+ Tenta''cruel''. They retain all of the same annoying abilities as their unevolved form, but pack a much larger punch and are difficult to OneHitKO (the only way to ensure that none of their detremental moves are used) even with a strong Electric-type attack.

to:

** Tentacruel, which can be encountered while surfing on any ocean route. Their unevolved form, Tentacool, are much more fitting as GodDamnBats thanks to their abilities to both confuse and poison your Pokémon, as well as prevent you from fleeing or switching them out with the trapping move Wrap.Wrap (in Gen I). The trouble is that Tentacruel can appear in the exact same places. It can be quite a shock to go from battling Tentacool with levels in the high-teens to suddenly staring down a level 40+ Tenta''cruel''. They retain all of the same annoying abilities as their unevolved form, but pack a much larger punch and are more difficult to OneHitKO (the only way to ensure that none of their detremental moves are used) even with a strong Electric-type attack.used).



** Weezing. Take the same ActionBomb tendencies of Graveler above, and add them to a high-Defense Pokémon ''without'' a 4x weakness. Also made worse in the remakes thanks to their Levitate ability, which renders them immune to Groud, one of their two weaknesses.

to:

** Weezing. Take the same ActionBomb tendencies of Graveler above, and add them to a high-Defense Pokémon ''without'' a 4x weakness. Also made worse in the remakes thanks to their Levitate ability, which renders them immune to Groud, Ground, one of their two weaknesses.



* {{Padding}}: Gen I starts the series trend of padding out the play time with significant ForcedLevelGrinding. Improved but still extant in the remakes which expand the plot a bit.



* ThatOneAttack: Blizzard in the first generation games. High damage, good accuracy, and if it connects and you don't resist it, you're likely getting KOed.



* GrowingTheBeard: ''Pokémon Yellow'' actually is a better game than ''Red'' and ''Blue'' in terms of gameplay, as the majority of bugs, glitches, and imbalances are fixed, and the way is paved for the full beard-growing of the franchise with ''Gold'' and ''Silver''.

to:

* GrowingTheBeard: ''Pokémon Yellow'' actually ''Yellow'' is a better much more polished game than ''Red'' and ''Blue'' in terms of gameplay, as the ''Blue''. The majority of bugs, glitches, bugs and imbalances glitches are fixed, and the way is paved fixed while Pokémon sprites are significantly upgraded, setting their standard appearances headed forward. This paves for the full beard-growing of the franchise with ''Gold'' and ''Silver''.



* ThatOneAttack: Wrap, Fire Spin, Bind and Clamp. All of these moves disallow your opponent from moving for the duration of the attack. Sadly, since many Pokémon that learn these moves are fast, your Pokémon are highly unlikely to make a move when faced against these foes. Thankfully, they were nerfed in future generations.

to:

* ThatOneAttack: ThatOneAttack:
* ThatOneAttack:
** Blizzard in the first generation games. High damage, good accuracy, and if it connects and you don't resist it, you're likely getting [=KOed=].
** Any Trapping moves such as
Wrap, Bind, Fire Spin, Bind and Clamp.etc. All of these moves disallow your opponent from moving for the duration of the attack. Sadly, since many Pokémon that learn these moves are fast, your Pokémon are highly unlikely to make a move when faced against these foes. Thankfully, they were nerfed in future generations.

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