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* Creator/TerryPratchett
* Creator/HansChristianAndersen
* Creator/RickRiordan





The Childlike Empress doesn't care if humans escape from Fanstastica or not, even though she can't live without them.
Also, she shows signs of Sloth by not giving orders.

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The Childlike Empress doesn't care if humans escape from Fanstastica Fantastica or not, even though she can't live without them.
them. Also, she shows signs of Sloth by not giving orders.orders.



[[WMG: The G'mork was lying about Fantasia being the world of human fantasy.]]
Or at least choosing his words carefully. Fantasia isn't the realm of the fantasies of all of mankind, it's the world born of the imagination of one specific person at a time. The one that dreamed up Fantasia? Moon Child. When she died, Fantasia passed onto her son who was the only person in the world to be as greater dreamer as she was. So why is Fantasia dying? Because Bastian is so broken up with grief over his mother's death, that he can't dream as he once did. The description of the Nothing and its effects sound very similar to depression caused by grief. A dead emptiness, a loss of hope, an inability to imagine or dream, etc. The Nothing is a manifestation of Bastian's depression. Hell, it's servant is a literal black dog that pursues the story's protagonist who is part of Bastian. This explains why the Nothing is a recent phenomenon and why Bastian finally starting to move beyond his grief and be able to dream again, is what destroys it. The explanation that's sort of given as to why the Nothing has just now suddenly started to appear is the usual NewMediaAreEvil excuse. But that doesn't really make sense when you think about it. For one, TV and video games rotting a person's brain is suspect anyway. Plus, Fantasia is meant to be human fantasy, not just ''book'' human fantasy. So, what, people like Disney, Miyazaki and Newell have no imagination? Don't buy it for a second. Human fantasy may be evolving with new media, but it isn't dying. Finally there's just the sheer numbers to contend with. There're more people alive in Bastian's time than have ever been. So even if ninety percent of human beings had lost the ability to dream through watching TV, there still should be enough left to keep Fantasia alive. What about cultures that have no new media? Don't they count? Anyway, Bastian pushes through the funk he'd been lost in, decides to dream again and Fantasia is healed. When he dies, it'll pass onto someone else and keep on going forever that way. As for why the G'mork lied to Ateyu, either he just didn't know (why would he? The Nothing is never presented as being all knowing, just powerful and deadly) or he didn't want to give away too much. Fun to torment Atreyu, too dangerous to tell him the truth.

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[[WMG: The G'mork was lying about Fantasia Fantastica being the world of human fantasy.]]
Or at least choosing his words carefully. Fantasia Fantastica isn't the realm of the fantasies of all of mankind, it's the world born of the imagination of one specific person at a time. The one that dreamed up Fantasia? Fantastica? Moon Child. When she died, Fantasia Fantastica passed onto her son who was the only person in the world to be as greater dreamer as she was. So why is Fantasia Fantastica dying? Because Bastian is so broken up with grief over his mother's death, that he can't dream as he once did. The description of the Nothing and its effects sound very similar to depression caused by grief. A dead emptiness, a loss of hope, an inability to imagine or dream, etc. The Nothing is a manifestation of Bastian's depression. Hell, it's servant is a literal black dog that pursues the story's protagonist who is part of Bastian. This explains why the Nothing is a recent phenomenon and why Bastian finally starting to move beyond his grief and be able to dream again, is what destroys it. The explanation that's sort of given as to why the Nothing has just now suddenly started to appear is the usual NewMediaAreEvil excuse. But that doesn't really make sense when you think about it. For one, TV and video games rotting a person's brain is suspect anyway. Plus, Fantasia Fantastica is meant to be human fantasy, not just ''book'' human fantasy. So, what, people like Disney, Miyazaki and Newell have no imagination? Don't buy it for a second. Human fantasy may be evolving with new media, but it isn't dying. Finally there's just the sheer numbers to contend with. There're more people alive in Bastian's time than have ever been. So even if ninety percent of human beings had lost the ability to dream through watching TV, there still should be enough left to keep Fantasia Fantastica alive. What about cultures that have no new media? Don't they count? Anyway, Bastian pushes through the funk he'd been lost in, decides to dream again and Fantasia Fantastica is healed. When he dies, it'll pass onto someone else and keep on going forever that way. As for why the G'mork lied to Ateyu, either he just didn't know (why would he? The Nothing is never presented as being all knowing, just powerful and deadly) or he didn't want to give away too much. Fun to torment Atreyu, too dangerous to tell him the truth.



[[WMG: Everything is really Fantasia and there is no real world]]

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[[WMG: Everything is really Fantasia Fantastica and there is no real world]]



** Mr. Coreander ''did'' say there were other doors into Fantasia.

[[WMG: The deterioration in Fantasia, the character derailment, bad pop culture references and a lot of the other "quirks" in the 3rd movie are a result of TV rotting Bastian's imagination]]
It makes sense. The world becomes less vivid and cohesive, everyone becomes more shallow and changes in nonsensical ways, and Bastian can no longer think with as much imagination as before. The Childlike Empress arbitrarily restricts his wish, because that's what they do in FairyOddParents

to:

** Mr. Coreander ''did'' say there were other doors into Fantasia.

Fantastica.

[[WMG: The deterioration in Fantasia, Fantastica, the character derailment, bad pop culture references and a lot of the other "quirks" in the 3rd movie are a result of TV rotting Bastian's imagination]]
It makes sense. The world becomes less vivid and cohesive, everyone becomes more shallow and changes in nonsensical ways, and Bastian can no longer think with as much imagination as before. The Childlike Empress arbitrarily restricts his wish, because that's what they do in FairyOddParents
''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents''



[[WMG: Bastian's father is abusive]]
...and probably caused his wife's death, somehow. Bastian is a lot like his mother, so he gets a lot of abuse from his father. He reads books to escape thinking about it. Fantasia represents his childhood, memories of his mother, the things he likes in books, The Nothing is anxieties and fears, especially about growing up and living without his mother.

[[WMG: The Manipulators are The Grey Men from {{Literature/Momo}}]]

to:

[[WMG: Bastian's father is abusive]]
...and probably caused his wife's death, somehow. Bastian is a lot like his mother, so he gets a lot of abuse from his father. He reads books to escape thinking about it. Fantasia represents his childhood, memories of his mother, the things he likes in books, The Nothing is anxieties and fears, especially about growing up and living without his mother.

[[WMG: The Manipulators are The Grey Men from {{Literature/Momo}}]]''Literature/{{Momo}}'']]



* When Fantasians fall victim to The Nothing, they turn from dreams into lies - Gigi looses his ability to dream and instead begins to lie, when the Grey Men make him a TV star and he is kept under constant stress and pressure to succeed as a consequence

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* When Fantasians Fantasticans fall victim to The Nothing, they turn from dreams into lies - Gigi looses his ability to dream and instead begins to lie, when the Grey Men make him a TV star and he is kept under constant stress and pressure to succeed as a consequence



[[WMG: All of fiction lives in Fantasia]]
During the Ivory Tower scene near the beginning of the first movie, you can JUST make out [[MickeyMouse Mickey Mouse]], Gumby and even a few [[StarWars Star Wars characters]] gathered in the small crowd atop the tower. At first glance, these seem to be little more than {{Easter Egg}}s the filmmakers snuck in for funsies. That is, up until you remember that Fantasia is the realm of Human Fantasy. As in, the realm of imagination and fiction. So while Mickey and Chewbacca weren't book characters, they were nonetheless in their own stories, and all stories are true in Fantasia.

Basically, Fantasia is home to every fictional character.....ever.

to:

[[WMG: All of fiction lives in Fantasia]]
Fantastica]]
During the Ivory Tower scene near the beginning of the first movie, you can JUST make out [[MickeyMouse Mickey Mouse]], Gumby WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse, WesternAnimation/{{Gumby}} and even a few [[StarWars Star Wars characters]] ''Franchise/StarWars'' characters gathered in the small crowd atop the tower. At first glance, these seem to be little more than {{Easter Egg}}s the filmmakers snuck in for funsies. That is, up until you remember that Fantasia Fantastica is the realm of Human Fantasy. As in, the realm of imagination and fiction. So while Mickey and Chewbacca weren't book characters, they were nonetheless in their own stories, and all stories are true in Fantasia.

Fantastica.

Basically, Fantasia Fantastica is home to every fictional character.....ever.



[[WMG: Former visitors to Fantasia]]

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[[WMG: Former visitors to Fantasia]]Fantastica]]

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[[WMG: The Manipulators from the book, the ones who unleashed the Nothing upon Fantastica, are The Psicoanalists from our own world]]

They are the ones who can decide if you're sane or insane, which kind of thoughts are right or wrong. And they even catalogue the use of fantasy as a "Toxic Defense Mechanism".
They are described as proselitizers and manipulators, who have an agenda to direct the people.



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[[WMG: The Childlike Empress is Apathy.]]
The Childlike Empress doesn't care if humans escape from Fanstastica or not, even though she can't live without them.
Also, she shows signs of Sloth by not giving orders.


* Confirmed by the author [[https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figuren_und_magische_Gegenstände_in_der_Unendlichen_Geschichte#Die_Inschrift_.E2.80.9ETu.2C_was_du_willst.E2.80.9C in a text in his Nachlass]], with some bashing of the movie for good measure: ''"[...] der Satz ursprünglich aus dem Englischen stammt, und zwar von dem Schriftsteller Aleister Crowley (gestorben 1947), und dort heißt: ‚Do what thou wilt‘ (feierliches Kirchenenglisch). Das ‚Do what you dream!‘ ist Petersens Interpretation, und zwar die falsche. Es ist genau der Irrtum, dem auch Bastian unterliegt und um dessentwillen er aus Phantásien nicht mehr zurückfindet. Auch er meint zunächst, es ginge darum, zu tun, was man wünscht, ersehnt, gern möchte. Der Löwe Graógráman wird zornig, als Bastian ihm diese Deutung sagt. Seinen ‚Wahren Willen‘ finden, heißt ganz und gar nicht, zu tun, was man möchte. Diese Formel ‚Tu, was du willst!‘ geht über Rabelais bis zum Heiligen Augustin zurück."''

to:

* Confirmed by the author [[https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figuren_und_magische_Gegenstände_in_der_Unendlichen_Geschichte#Die_Inschrift_.E2.80.9ETu.2C_was_du_willst.E2.80.9C in a text in his Nachlass]], with some bashing of the movie for good measure: ''"[...] der Satz ursprünglich aus dem Englischen stammt, und zwar von dem Schriftsteller Aleister Crowley (gestorben 1947), und dort heißt: ‚Do what thou wilt‘ (feierliches Kirchenenglisch). Das ‚Do what you dream!‘ ist Petersens Interpretation, und zwar die falsche. Es ist genau der Irrtum, dem auch Bastian unterliegt und um dessentwillen er aus Phantásien nicht mehr zurückfindet. Auch er meint zunächst, es ginge darum, zu tun, was man wünscht, ersehnt, gern möchte. Der Löwe Graógráman wird zornig, als Bastian ihm diese Deutung sagt. Seinen ‚Wahren Willen‘ finden, heißt ganz und gar nicht, zu tun, was man möchte. Diese Formel ‚Tu, was du willst!‘ geht über Rabelais bis zum Heiligen Augustin zurück."''"'' [[note]] "[...] the sentence originally came from English, namely by the writer Aleister Crowley (died 1947), and it says, 'Do what thou wilt' (Solemn Church English). 'Do what you dream' is Petersen's interpretation, and indeed the wrong one. It's exactly the same mistake Bastian makes, which means he can no longer find his way back from Fantastica: At first he thinks it's about doing what you wish, longs for, and like to do. Graógráman the lion gets angry when Bastian tells him this interpretation and says that finding your 'True Will' does not at all mean doing everything you want. The wording, "do what you will!' goes back through Rabelais to Saint Augustine."[[/note]]

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[[WMG: The Childlike Empress' seven powers are the personifications of the seven chakras.]]


*** The Old Man warned her quite strongly that neither he nor she would be able to escape the time loop unless her BatmanGambit worked and Bastian named her.

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*** ** The Old Man warned her quite strongly that neither he nor she would be able to escape the time loop unless her BatmanGambit worked and Bastian named her.



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**** The Old Man warned her quite strongly that neither he nor she would be able to escape the time loop unless her BatmanGambit worked and Bastian named her.

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* Creator/TheBrothersGrimm

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* Creator/TerryGilliam

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* Creator/NeilGaiman
* Creator/HayaoMiyazaki
* Creator/DonBluth

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* Creator/PhilipPullman

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* Creator/JKRowling

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[[WMG: Former visitors to Fantasia]]
Besides Shakespeare.
* Creator/JRRTolkien
* Creator/CSLewis
* Creator/WaltDisney
* Creator/GeorgeLucas
* Creator/StevenSpielberg
* Creator/JimHenson


* Confirmed by the author [[https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figuren_und_magische_Gegenst%C3%A4nde_in_der_Unendlichen_Geschichte#Die_Inschrift_.E2.80.9ETu.2C_was_du_willst.E2.80.9C in a text in his Nachlass]], with some bashing of the movie for good measure: ''"[...] der Satz ursprünglich aus dem Englischen stammt, und zwar von dem Schriftsteller Aleister Crowley (gestorben 1947), und dort heißt: ‚Do what thou wilt‘ (feierliches Kirchenenglisch). Das ‚Do what you dream!‘ ist Petersens Interpretation, und zwar die falsche. Es ist genau der Irrtum, dem auch Bastian unterliegt und um dessentwillen er aus Phantásien nicht mehr zurückfindet. Auch er meint zunächst, es ginge darum, zu tun, was man wünscht, ersehnt, gern möchte. Der Löwe Graógráman wird zornig, als Bastian ihm diese Deutung sagt. Seinen ‚Wahren Willen‘ finden, heißt ganz und gar nicht, zu tun, was man möchte. Diese Formel ‚Tu, was du willst!‘ geht über Rabelais bis zum Heiligen Augustin zurück."''

to:

* Confirmed by the author [[https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figuren_und_magische_Gegenst%C3%A4nde_in_der_Unendlichen_Geschichte#Die_Inschrift_.org/wiki/Figuren_und_magische_Gegenstände_in_der_Unendlichen_Geschichte#Die_Inschrift_.E2.80.9ETu.2C_was_du_willst.E2.80.9C in a text in his Nachlass]], with some bashing of the movie for good measure: ''"[...] der Satz ursprünglich aus dem Englischen stammt, und zwar von dem Schriftsteller Aleister Crowley (gestorben 1947), und dort heißt: ‚Do what thou wilt‘ (feierliches Kirchenenglisch). Das ‚Do what you dream!‘ ist Petersens Interpretation, und zwar die falsche. Es ist genau der Irrtum, dem auch Bastian unterliegt und um dessentwillen er aus Phantásien nicht mehr zurückfindet. Auch er meint zunächst, es ginge darum, zu tun, was man wünscht, ersehnt, gern möchte. Der Löwe Graógráman wird zornig, als Bastian ihm diese Deutung sagt. Seinen ‚Wahren Willen‘ finden, heißt ganz und gar nicht, zu tun, was man möchte. Diese Formel ‚Tu, was du willst!‘ geht über Rabelais bis zum Heiligen Augustin zurück."''

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