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The game, and the startup company called [=GXStudios=] that operated it, was created in 2007 by a few Ivy League students. Their goals seemed to have been to sell this as a fun spirit-building tool to companies and schools, and to make it big in the online gaming market. GXC was, at one point, renamed "[=PickTeams=]", as the company tried introducing a few other minigames on their site, but the original name "Go Cross Campus" or "GXC" stuck. Unfortunately, [=GXStudios=] [[TooGoodToLast closed their doors]] in early 2010.

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The game, and the startup company called [=GXStudios=] that operated it, was created in 2007 by a few Ivy League students. Their goals seemed to have been to sell this as a fun spirit-building tool to companies and schools, and to make it big in the online gaming market. GXC was, at one point, renamed "[=PickTeams=]", as the company tried introducing a few other minigames on their site, but the original name "Go Cross Campus" or "GXC" stuck. Unfortunately, [=GXStudios=] [[TooGoodToLast closed their doors]] doors in early 2010.



* TooGoodToLast: The game was a huge thing with matches at numerous universities (and sometimes between them), and even received quite a bit of recognition from news media. However, it all disappeared after just a few years.


* RedShirtArmy: If you think of your units as "armies" (or even individual troops), then yeah. The game later turned away from this trope, but changing the term for military strength units to "energy".

to:

* RedShirtArmy: If you think of your units as "armies" (or even individual troops), then yeah. The game later turned away from this trope, but by changing the term for military strength units to "energy".



* ZergRush: Since attackers have an inherent disadvantage, the only way to successfully attack a territory is to throw more than enough attacking units, each of which individually have little efficacy at the defending territory.

to:

* ZergRush: Since attackers have an inherent disadvantage, the only way to successfully attack a territory is to throw more than enough attacking units, each units (each of which individually have has little efficacy efficacy) at the defending territory.


* Teams were created based largely on flavor. For example, games set on maps of college campuses, usually organized by student life officials, allowed players to choose teams based on their dorm (which often led to lopsided teams based on dorm size or participation rate; in open games, players were randomly assigned to teams to balance team sizes). In a game set on a map of {{Disneyland}}, teams included DisneyPrincesses. In a game set on a map of New York City, teams were [[Franchise/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles Ninja Turtles]].

to:

* Teams were created based largely on flavor. For example, games set on maps of college campuses, usually organized by student life officials, allowed players to choose teams based on their dorm (which often led to lopsided teams based on dorm size or participation rate; in open games, players were randomly assigned to teams to balance team sizes). In a game set on a map of {{Disneyland}}, [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Disneyland]], teams included DisneyPrincesses. In a game set on a map of New York City, teams were [[Franchise/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles Ninja Turtles]].


* Teams were created based largely on flavor. For example, games set on maps of college campuses, usually organized by student life officials, allowed players to choose teams based on their dorm (which often led to lopsided teams based on dorm size or participation rate; in open games, players were randomly assigned to teams to balance team sizes). In a game set on a map of {{Disneyland}}, teams included DisneyPrincesses. In a game set on a map of New York City, teams were NinjaTurtles.

to:

* Teams were created based largely on flavor. For example, games set on maps of college campuses, usually organized by student life officials, allowed players to choose teams based on their dorm (which often led to lopsided teams based on dorm size or participation rate; in open games, players were randomly assigned to teams to balance team sizes). In a game set on a map of {{Disneyland}}, teams included DisneyPrincesses. In a game set on a map of New York City, teams were NinjaTurtles.[[Franchise/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles Ninja Turtles]].


The game, and the startup company called [=GXStudios=] that operated it, was created in 2007 by a few Ivy League students. Their goals seemed to have been to sell this as a fun spirit-building tool to companies and schools, and to make it big in the online gaming market. GXC was, at one point, renamed "[=PickTeams=]", as the company tried introducing a few other minigames on their site, but the original name "Go Cross Campus" or "GXC" stuck. Unfortunately, [=GXStudios=] closed their doors in early 2010.

to:

The game, and the startup company called [=GXStudios=] that operated it, was created in 2007 by a few Ivy League students. Their goals seemed to have been to sell this as a fun spirit-building tool to companies and schools, and to make it big in the online gaming market. GXC was, at one point, renamed "[=PickTeams=]", as the company tried introducing a few other minigames on their site, but the original name "Go Cross Campus" or "GXC" stuck. Unfortunately, [=GXStudios=] [[TooGoodToLast closed their doors doors]] in early 2010.


Added DiffLines:

* TooGoodToLast: The game was a huge thing with matches at numerous universities (and sometimes between them), and even received quite a bit of recognition from news media. However, it all disappeared after just a few years.


* [invoked] TooGoodToLast: A lot of players quite enjoyed the game. The game even received numerous accolades in news outlets. Then it got shut down.


The game, and the startup company called [=GXStudios=] that operated it, was created in 2007 by a few Ivy League students. Their goals seemed to have been to sell this as a fun spirit-building tool to companies and schools, and to make it big in the online gaming market. GXC was, at one point, renamed "[=PickTeams=]", as the company tried introducing a few other minigames on their site, but the original name "Go Cross Campus" or "GXC" stuck. Unfortunately, [=GXStudios=] TooGoodToLast closed their doors in early 2010.

to:

The game, and the startup company called [=GXStudios=] that operated it, was created in 2007 by a few Ivy League students. Their goals seemed to have been to sell this as a fun spirit-building tool to companies and schools, and to make it big in the online gaming market. GXC was, at one point, renamed "[=PickTeams=]", as the company tried introducing a few other minigames on their site, but the original name "Go Cross Campus" or "GXC" stuck. Unfortunately, [=GXStudios=] TooGoodToLast closed their doors in early 2010.


An online computer videogame. The name is often abbreviated "GXC". The best way to describe this is ''{{Risk}}'' as a massively-multiplayer online game. It is currently defunct.

to:

An online computer videogame. The name is often abbreviated "GXC". The best way to describe this is ''{{Risk}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{Risk}}'' as a massively-multiplayer online game. It is currently defunct.


The game, and the startup company called [=GXStudios=] that operated it, was created in 2007 by a few Ivy League students. Their goals seemed to have been to sell this as a fun spirit-building tool to companies and schools, and to make it big in the online gaming market. GXC was, at one point, renamed "[=PickTeams=]", as the company tried introducing a few other minigames on their site, but the original name "Go Cross Campus" or "GXC" stuck. Unfortunately, [=GXStudios=] [[TooGoodToLast closed their doors]] in "early 2010".

to:

The game, and the startup company called [=GXStudios=] that operated it, was created in 2007 by a few Ivy League students. Their goals seemed to have been to sell this as a fun spirit-building tool to companies and schools, and to make it big in the online gaming market. GXC was, at one point, renamed "[=PickTeams=]", as the company tried introducing a few other minigames on their site, but the original name "Go Cross Campus" or "GXC" stuck. Unfortunately, [=GXStudios=] [[TooGoodToLast TooGoodToLast closed their doors]] doors in "early 2010".
early 2010.


** Later versions introduced special territories that changed the probability of victory, provided double or half units allocation for players situated there, and other effects.



** Later versions of the game introduced "fortified" territories that made it 30-70, as well as "no cover" territories that made it 58-42. Other special territories included ones where players got double or half of their usual energy allocation.

to:

** Later versions of the game introduced "fortified" territories that made it 30-70, as well as "no cover" territories that made it 58-42. Other special territories included ones where players got double or half of their usual energy allocation.

Added DiffLines:

* [invoked] TooGoodToLast: A lot of players quite enjoyed the game. The game even received numerous accolades in news outlets. Then it got shut down.


* GoodBadBug: Originally, if you ordered your units to attack, they wouldn't defend against attackers. Since teams had to have at least one capture per turn, players quickly realized that they could have all the units on a pair of territories between mutually consenting teams attack each other, which would cause them to "swap" the territories, with minimal losses. Alliances between teams often included these swapping arrangements. This bug was later changed to give attacking units going head-on at each other a 50-50 probability of success, though that just created loop swaps, where territory B would conquer territory C, and A would conquer B, then the next turn C would conquer A and B would conquer C, and so forth -- a bit more difficult but still doable.



* TheyChangedItNowItSucks: There was some backlash against changing armies to energy and placing players on the game map itself, as well as the introduction of special territories. However, in an inversion...
** They Didn't Change It, And That's Why It Sucks: As the company introduced an (at first highly buggy) "Lightning GXC", and then diversified into other games, some GXC players complained that the company was neglecting their flagship product, by not fixing various bugs or improving the game mechanics.
* TooGoodToLast: A lot of players quite enjoyed the game, and some still miss it even now, a few years after its shutdown.


The game, and the startup company called [=GXStudios=] that operated it, was created in 2007 by a few Ivy League students. Their goals seemed to have been to sell this as a fun spirit-building tool to companies and schools, and to make it big in the online gaming market. GXC was, at one point, renamed "[=PickTeams=]", but the previous name "Go Cross Campus" or "GXC" stuck. Unfortunately, [=GXStudios=] [[TooGoodToLast closed their doors]] in "early 2010".

to:

The game, and the startup company called [=GXStudios=] that operated it, was created in 2007 by a few Ivy League students. Their goals seemed to have been to sell this as a fun spirit-building tool to companies and schools, and to make it big in the online gaming market. GXC was, at one point, renamed "[=PickTeams=]", as the company tried introducing a few other minigames on their site, but the previous original name "Go Cross Campus" or "GXC" stuck. Unfortunately, [=GXStudios=] [[TooGoodToLast closed their doors]] in "early 2010".


* Teams were created based largely on flavor. For example, the game set on the map of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, organized by undergraduate student life officials, divided players into teams based on their dorm (which often led to lopsided teams based on dorm size or participation rate; in open games, players were randomly assigned to teams to balance team sizes). In a game set on a map of {{Disneyland}}, teams included DisneyPrincesses. In a game set on a map of New York City, teams were NinjaTurtles.

to:

* Teams were created based largely on flavor. For example, the game games set on the map maps of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, college campuses, usually organized by undergraduate student life officials, divided allowed players into to choose teams based on their dorm (which often led to lopsided teams based on dorm size or participation rate; in open games, players were randomly assigned to teams to balance team sizes). In a game set on a map of {{Disneyland}}, teams included DisneyPrincesses. In a game set on a map of New York City, teams were NinjaTurtles.

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