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* AnyoneCanDie: Unlike in Warband, the player may freely execute enemy lords. Doing so has been indicated by the devs to be a bad idea, depending on the lord in question; fewer people will weep if you kill a dishonorable lord, but he was still part of the aristocracy and therefore supposed to be above such things. Especially given that (depending on settings) the player's OWN immortality card has been revoked. Wind up a captive of someone you've pissed off and you might find yourself on the executioner's block.

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* AnyoneCanDie: Unlike in Warband, the player may freely execute enemy lords. Doing so has been indicated by the devs to be a bad idea, with how angry people will get depending on the lord in question; fewer people will weep if you kill a dishonorable lord, piece of crap, but he was still part of the aristocracy and therefore supposed to be above such things. Especially given that (depending on settings) the player's OWN immortality card has been revoked. Wind up a captive of someone you've pissed off and you might find yourself on the executioner's block.block, and if you don't have anyone in your clan to take over, it's game over.


** Swadians: Balanced, Elitists. (Most powerful Heavy Cavalry and overall balanced force)

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** Swadians: Balanced, Elitists.Generalist, elitists. (Most powerful Heavy Cavalry and overall balanced force)


* LowFantasy: A borderline example. The land of Calradia is a ConstructedWorld, but there's no non-human races, no magic or supernatural elements, and no overarching evil. You play as a wandering human hero and must make a name for yourself in a world of feuding, [[GreyAndGrayMorality ethically questionable]] warlords with only guile and a good swordarm, and the only "evil" is the warlord or nation you are currently aligned against.

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* LowFantasy: A borderline example.example; it's debatable if the game qualifies as ''any'' kind of fantasy. The land of Calradia is a ConstructedWorld, but there's no non-human races, no magic or supernatural elements, and no overarching evil. You play as a wandering human hero and must make a name for yourself in a world of feuding, [[GreyAndGrayMorality ethically questionable]] warlords with only guile and a good swordarm, and the only "evil" is the warlord or nation you are currently aligned against.

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* DividedWeFall: The Calradic Empire has split into three, each viewing their Emperor as the sole legitimate one, and their succession method as the best. In canon, the Empire will fall; the player can strive to prevent it (or help it do so).
** In addition, the Kingdom of Vlandia is large and powerful, but for the fact that its constituent Clans do not like each other, and because of that they don't work together that well, meaning they have trouble reaching their full potential. In-lore, after the Vlandians become the Swadians, these disagreements are not solved, resulting in the southern chunk of the realm splitting off to become the Rhodoks of the original game.


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* TheFriendNobodylikes: Like in Warband, some nobles are outright jerks, feeling nothing about raiding caravans, and like Warband, honorable lords don't like them very much. This only goes so far, though; even if they are an asshole, if you execute them, even the honorable Lords will think less of you; however, they won't be quite as angry as if you'd killed someone less deserving of it. They're still a noble, after all.

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** In a similar fashion, one of the clans of the Asarai is the Banu Sarran clan, which would probably take control over the Aserai Sultanate to form the Sarranid Sultanate we see in ''Warband''.


A proper sequel, ''Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord'', serves as a prequel to ''Mount & Blade: Warband'' with an engine overhaul and gameplay improvements. The game's release date is unknown but according to Frank Eliott, known as Captain Lust, a former developers and PR manager, there will be public beta testing.

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A proper sequel, ''Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord'', serves as a prequel to ''Mount & Blade: Warband'' with an engine overhaul and gameplay improvements. The game's game has been announced to release date is unknown but according to Frank Eliott, known as Captain Lust, a former developers into Early Access in March 2020, and PR manager, there will be public a multiplayer beta testing.
started in the later part of 2019.


* ColourCodedForYourConvenience: MUCH more than in the previous games, leading to...

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* ColourCodedForYourConvenience: MUCH more than in the previous games, leading as Taleworlds wants players to know at a glance who belongs to what faction. As a result, this has led to...


* ColorCodedCharacters: Unlike in the original ''Mount & Blade'', where every lord had a banner that could be completely different from others even in the same kingdom, in ''Bannerlord'' every clan instead has an emblem, which on their banners has a background consisting of the primary color of their faction. This was done deliberately, as with so many more factions and characters on the map, the developers wanted players to be able to tell at a glance who belonged to what faction.

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* ColourCodedForYourConvenience: MUCH more than in the previous games, leading to...
** ColorCodedArmies: Soldiers who belong to a faction and wear heraldic armor will all wear the same color, with only the emblem of their leader's clan differing.
**
ColorCodedCharacters: Unlike in the original ''Mount & Blade'', Blade'' and ''Warband'', where every lord nobleman had a banner that could be completely radically different from others even in other nobles of the same kingdom, in ''Bannerlord'' faction, every clan instead has an emblem, emblem instead, which on is laid over a banner with their banners has a background consisting of the faction's primary color of their faction. This was done deliberately, as with so many more factions and characters on the map, the developers wanted players to be able to tell at a glance who belonged to what faction.color.


* AncestralWeapon: The game features a robust crafting system, allowing players to design all sorts of weird and unique weapons, give them a name, and use them in battle. With ''Bannerlord'' featuring dynastic elements (if your character dies, you take over as someone else in your clan), these weapons your character crafted can pass down the generations.



* TheClan: Each lord of a faction belongs to a Clan, which is their family; rather than fiefs being assigned to lords, they're instead assigned to Clans. Given that lords can die, either through battle or old age, the holdings remain in the family. The Player is not immune to this; they belong to a Clan of their own (you can start with siblings, and nieces/nephews), and can gain new family members through childbirth (your Companions are also said to be part of your Clan).



* TheClan: Each lord of a faction belongs to a Clan, which is their family; rather than fiefs being assigned to lords, they're instead assigned to Clans. Given that lords can die, either through battle or old age, the holdings remain in the family. The Player is not immune to this; they belong to a Clan of their own (you can start with siblings, and nieces/nephews), and can gain new family members through childbirth (your Companions are also said to be part of your Clan).

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* ColorCodedCharacters: Unlike in the original ''Mount & Blade'', where every lord had a banner that could be completely different from others even in the same kingdom, in ''Bannerlord'' every clan instead has an emblem, which on their banners has a background consisting of the primary color of their faction. This was done deliberately, as with so many more factions and characters on the map, the developers wanted players to be able to tell at a glance who belonged to what faction.


* LostRomanLegion: Calradic Legion, and played with. They're still around, but due to the decline of the Empire, they've moved away from the system of Legions and adopted a Byzantine-style Theme system. A sizable number of Legionnaires felt betrayed and broke away from the Empire, forming the Legion of the Betrayed. They're pretty much nothing but mercenaries now, and will fight for any faction (including the three Imperial factions) who can afford to pay them.

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* LostRomanLegion: Calradic Legion, and played with. They're The Legion is still around, but due to the decline of the Empire, they've the lords and Emperor moved away from the system of Legions and adopted a Byzantine-style Theme system. A sizable number of Legionnaires felt betrayed and broke away from the Empire, forming the Legion of the Betrayed. They're pretty much nothing but mercenaries now, and will fight for any faction (including the three Imperial factions) who can afford to pay them.


** Taken UpToEleven in ''Bannerlord'', which will have a cast that rotates as generations pass (peacefully or otherwise) and heirs take up their forefather's positions.



* StormingTheCastle:
** The most common method of expanding your territory.

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* StormingTheCastle:
**
StormingTheCastle: The most common method of expanding your territory.territory in all the games.
** In the original and Warband, attack options were fixed to a single siege tower or ladder, quickly creating chokepoints for the defenders.
** In ''With Fire and Sword'', the standard ladder option remained, but was accompanied by options like poisoning the defenders' water supply or simply blowing a hole in the wall to storm through.



** Majorly overhauled in ''Bannerlord'' due to player feedback - no longer is it only a single siege tower or ladder, now it can be by bombardment to make breaches, battering rams, multiple towers and ladders, or any combination thereof. Furthermore, sieges receive a VideoGame/TotalWar style deployment phase.



* EarlyBirdCameo: One of the Clans that makes up the Khuzait Khanate is the Khergit Clan, who in canon Warband lore will apparently either split or take over from the Khuzaits and press westward deeper into the crumbling Empire and its successor states, becoming the Khergit Khanate that has been part of the game since the original Mount & Blade.

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* EarlyBirdCameo: One of the Clans that makes up the Khuzait Khanate is the Khergit Clan, who in canon Warband lore will apparently either split or take over from the Khuzaits and press westward deeper into the crumbling Empire and its successor states, becoming the Khergit Khanate that has been part of the game since the original Mount ''Mount & Blade.Blade''.



* FantasyCounterpartCulture: Would it really be Mount & Blade without them?

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* FantasyCounterpartCulture: Would it really be Mount ''Mount & Blade Blade'' without them?



* MercenaryUnits: The game features several minor factions, each of whom can serve as mercenaries for the different major nations.



* MercenaryUnits: The game features several minor factions, each of whom can serve as mercenaries for the different major nations.

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* LostRomanLegion: Calradic Legion, and played with. They're still around, but due to the decline of the Empire, they've moved away from the system of Legions and adopted a Byzantine-style Theme system. A sizable number of Legionnaires felt betrayed and broke away from the Empire, forming the Legion of the Betrayed. They're pretty much nothing but mercenaries now, and will fight for any faction (including the three Imperial factions) who can afford to pay them.


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* PregnantBadass: The devs have indicated that female player characters will not be penalized or limited in any way when they are bearing children, as laying up a player for several months might be realistic, but isn't much fun.

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* EarlyBirdCameo: One of the Clans that makes up the Khuzait Khanate is the Khergit Clan, who in canon Warband lore will apparently either split or take over from the Khuzaits and press westward deeper into the crumbling Empire and its successor states, becoming the Khergit Khanate that has been part of the game since the original Mount & Blade.


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* TheEmperor: Three, actually, but they all claim to be the only true Emperor, and the Calradic Empire has become divided between them in a civil war that has weakened the Empire against the greed of their neighbors.


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* IstanbulNotConstantinople: Many cities on the northwestern segment of the map have familiar but different names, representing the linguistic drift that will take place in the 200 or so years between the era of Bannerlord and the time of Warband. Praven, for example, has an extra D, Sargoth is Sargot, Shariz is Charas, etc.

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