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* DisproportionateRetribution: Kirk thwarted Breddell's plan to take over his homeworld's government a decade ago. He then foiled Breddell's plans to manufacture {{Effective Knockoff}}s of Constitution-class Starships in ''25th Anniversary''. So naturally, Breddell now plans to [[spoiler: blow up Earth and destroy the Federation]].

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* DisproportionateRetribution: Kirk thwarted Breddell's plan to take over his homeworld's government a decade ago. He then foiled Breddell's plans to manufacture {{Effective Knockoff}}s of Constitution-class Starships in ''25th Anniversary''. So naturally, Breddell now plans to take his revenge on Kirk by [[spoiler: blow blowing up Earth and destroy destroying the Federation]].








* PortalDoor: One appears at the end of "Though This Be Madness", and takes you to the next mission. It's unclear whether it's actually a portal, or whether the whole thing is [[spoiler: nothing more than a holographic illusion]].

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* PortalDoor: One A door appears at the end of "Though This Be Madness", and takes you to the next mission. It's unclear whether it's actually a portal, or whether the whole thing is [[spoiler: nothing more than a holographic illusion]].



* {{Zeerust}}: One of the exhibits at the Smithsonian Annex is the working prototype of an "Aurora Generator". It is a bulky platform, as big as a pool table, that can wirelessly project electricity to any device over a short distance. Given how the away-team uses it later in the mission, however, the table-sized device is essentially what we would nowadays call a cellphone charging pad.

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* {{Zeerust}}: One of the exhibits at the Smithsonian Annex is the working prototype of an "Aurora Generator". It is a bulky platform, as big as a pool table, that can wirelessly project electricity to any device over a short distance. Given how the away-team uses it later in the mission, however, the table-sized device is essentially what we would nowadays call a cellphone charging pad.pad.
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* RaceAgainstTheClock: There are a few nominal ones, but [[TakeYourTime none of them actually affect gameplay.]]
** Breddell sets his DoomsdayDevice to fire at [[spoiler:Earth]] just before he's arrested. As Spock says, it could fire "at any moment".
** The alien ship "Compassion" is ''about'' to land on a Federation colony, and must be stopped [=ASAP=].



* TakeYourTime: None of the {{Ticking Clock}}s in the game will actually run out, no matter how long you wait.

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* TakeYourTime: None of the {{Ticking Clock}}s Ticking Clocks in the game will actually run out, no matter how long you wait.



* TickingClock: There are a few nominal ones, but [[TakeYourTime none of them actually affect gameplay.]]
** Breddell sets his DoomsdayDevice to fire at [[spoiler:Earth]] just before he's arrested. As Spock says, it could fire "at any moment".
** The alien ship "Compassion" is ''about'' to land on a Federation colony, and must be stopped [=ASAP=].


* BrokenAesop: "Light and Darkness" deals with appearances and morality. Two races appeal for Kirk's help in destroying the other race. One race looks angelic, the other demonic. While GuestStarPartyMember Ensign Jons swoons over the angel's "goodness" and rejects the demon's "evil", Kirk notices that the demon is in fact the passive one and the angel is bloody-minded. Nevertheless, he does his best to ignore their appearance and eventually convinces the two races to be joined genetically. When things come to a head with Jons at the end of the mission, you'd expect Kirk to convince him that appearances don't matter, and that actions count more than words (a sentiment he himself expresses earlier in the mission). NOPE! Instead, all you need to do is make Jons realize that these are single-celled life-forms incapable of morality, and that the creatures they're seeing are just automated holographic projections. So while the moral of the story starts as "don't judge a book by its cover", it somehow ends up being "genetic tampering is OK if the subjects are primitive life-forms."


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* SpaceWhaleAesop: "Light and Darkness" deals with appearances and morality. Two races appeal for Kirk's help in destroying the other race. One race looks angelic, the other demonic. While GuestStarPartyMember Ensign Jons swoons over the angel's "goodness" and rejects the demon's "evil", Kirk notices that the demon is in fact the passive one and the angel is bloody-minded. Nevertheless, he does his best to ignore their appearance and eventually convinces the two races to be joined genetically. When things come to a head with Jons at the end of the mission, you'd expect Kirk to convince him that appearances don't matter, and that actions count more than words (a sentiment he himself expresses earlier in the mission). NOPE! Instead, all you need to do is make Jons realize that these are single-celled life-forms incapable of morality, and that the creatures they're seeing are just automated holographic projections. So while the moral of the story starts as "don't judge a book by its cover", it somehow ends up being "genetic tampering is OK if the subjects are primitive life-forms."


* WarIsHell: In the best outcome to "No Man's Land" Kirk confronts Trelane about how historically inaccurate his recreation of World War I is, and offers to "improve" it by referring to the historical data on the Enterprise's computer. The end result demolishes Terlane's romanticism about Earth wars.

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* WarIsHell: In the best outcome to "No Man's Land" Kirk confronts Trelane about how historically inaccurate his recreation of World War I is, and offers to "improve" it by referring to the historical data on the Enterprise's computer. The end result demolishes Terlane's Trelane's romanticism about Earth wars.


** The Prime Directive is mentioned when dealing with the native population of Balkos III. Spock counters the natives are already being manipulated by what is clearly technology from some earlier alien visit, and thus interfering to remove this alien influence is permissible.

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** The Prime Directive is mentioned when dealing with the native population of Balkos III. Spock counters that the natives are already being manipulated by what is clearly technology from some earlier alien visit, and thus interfering to remove this alien influence is permissible.

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* MySpeciesDothProtestTooMuch: Captain Klarr is shown not to be the typical Klingon. Klarr is an very level-headed and honorable captain willing to cooperate with Kirk and the Federation crew. In order to get the best ending, you have to cooperate with and trust him. His [[HateSink subordinate]] however, is far less willing and honorable.


** The Prime Directive is mentioned when dealing with the native population of Nova Atar. Spock counters the natives are already being manipulated by what is clearly technology from some earlier alien visit, and thus interfering to remove this alien influence is permissible.

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** The Prime Directive is mentioned when dealing with the native population of Nova Atar.Balkos III. Spock counters the natives are already being manipulated by what is clearly technology from some earlier alien visit, and thus interfering to remove this alien influence is permissible.

Added DiffLines:

* WarIsHell: In the best outcome to "No Man's Land" Kirk confronts Trelane about how historically inaccurate his recreation of World War I is, and offers to "improve" it by referring to the historical data on the Enterprise's computer. The end result demolishes Terlane's romanticism about Earth wars.


* AlienNonInterferenceClause: Kirk cites the Prime Directive when refusing to help the Alphans and Omegans destroy each other - instead doing his best to find a compromise between the two species.

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* AlienNonInterferenceClause: AlienNonInterferenceClause:
**
Kirk cites the Prime Directive when refusing to help the Alphans and Omegans destroy each other - instead doing his best to find a compromise between the two species.species.
** The Prime Directive is mentioned when dealing with the native population of Nova Atar. Spock counters the natives are already being manipulated by what is clearly technology from some earlier alien visit, and thus interfering to remove this alien influence is permissible.

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* RedplicaBaron: The game features Trelane imagining himself as World War I pilot complete with the Red Baron's signature Fokker Triplane.


* SleeperStarship: Spock speculates that the ''Compassion'' (in "Though This Be Madness") may be a sleeper ship sent out to make a round-trip. The Phays does confirm this, but is an UnreliableExpositor to begin with, and its own actions indicate it might have been a {{GenerationShip|s}} instead. Unfortunately, the true answer is never revealed because [[spoiler: the whole thing is really just a SecretTestOfCharacter to see if the humans would spot the contradictions]].

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* SleeperStarship: Spock speculates that the ''Compassion'' (in "Though This Be Madness") may be a sleeper ship sent out to make a round-trip. The Phays does confirm this, but is an UnreliableExpositor to begin with, and its own actions indicate it might have been a {{GenerationShip|s}} {{Generation Ship|s}} instead. Unfortunately, the true answer is never revealed because [[spoiler: the whole thing is really just a SecretTestOfCharacter to see if the humans would spot the contradictions]].

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* TheBattleDidntCount: Whether you win or lose combat against Trelane's triplane, the outcome is the same. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] since he is a being of godlike power who enjoys playing games with Kirk.


*** Kirk even lampshades the trope before realizing the above.
----> '''Kirk:''' Computers. I'd better think of something illogical to say.

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*** Kirk even lampshades [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] the trope before realizing the above.
----> '''Kirk:''' Computers. [[GenreSavvy I'd better think start thinking of something illogical to say.say]].

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*** Kirk even lampshades the trope before realizing the above.
----> '''Kirk:''' Computers. I'd better think of something illogical to say.

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