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Added DiffLines:

* ShooOutTheClowns: Ratbone is nowhere to be seen in the final section of Lost Mind, the brain stem.


All three games work perfectly under UsefulNotes/DOSBox (or Windows 3.1 under [=DOSBox=] in the case of the third game).

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All three games work perfectly under UsefulNotes/DOSBox (or Windows 3.1 under [=DOSBox=] in the case of the third game).
game). Alternatively ScummVM added support for the first two games.


* HintsAreForLosers: Using the HintSystem reduce your overall game score, and in the third game, it also reduces the value of the puzzles.

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* HintsAreForLosers: Using the HintSystem reduce your overall game score, and in the third game, it also reduces the value of the puzzles.puzzles, making them take all the longer to complete.



** ''The Lost Mind Of Dr. Brain'': Motor Programming, with Dr. Brain himself walking around in a maze and picking up brains. Harder difficulties offer additional subroutines to allow you to collect the additional brains in the maze.

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** ''The Lost Mind Of Dr. Brain'': Motor Programming, with Dr. Brain himself walking around in a maze and picking up brains. Harder difficulties offer additional subroutines to allow you to collect the additional brains in the maze.


** ''The Lost Mind Of Dr. Brain'': Dr. Brain himself walking around in a maze and picking up brains. Harder difficulties offer additional subroutines to allow you to collect the additional brains in the maze.

to:

** ''The Lost Mind Of Dr. Brain'': Motor Programming, with Dr. Brain himself walking around in a maze and picking up brains. Harder difficulties offer additional subroutines to allow you to collect the additional brains in the maze.


* ShoutOut: Solving one puzzle in the observatory in ''Castle of Dr. Brain'' causes the monolith from ''Literature/2001ASpaceOdyssey'' to appear. Once you solve all the puzzles and get access to Dr. Brain's laboratory, a voice clip saying "My god, it's full of puzzles!" plays.

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* ShoutOut: Solving one puzzle in the observatory in ''Castle of Dr. Brain'' causes the monolith from ''Literature/2001ASpaceOdyssey'' ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' to appear. Once you solve all the puzzles and get access to Dr. Brain's laboratory, a voice clip saying "My god, it's full of puzzles!" plays.


* UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents: In the third game, Rathbone has this kind of accent, depending on the game played. In the Synaptic Cleft game, Rathbone, dressed as a cowboy, has a Texas drawl. In the Neural Maze game, he has a Noo Yawk accent while dressed as a utility worker.



* TheLabRat / FormallyNamedPet: Rathbone in the third game.

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* TheLabRat / FormallyNamedPet: TheLabRat: Rathbone in the third game.



* [[MadScientistsBeautifulDaughter Mad Scientist's Beautiful Niece]]: Elaina in the third game.

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* [[MadScientistsBeautifulDaughter Mad Scientist's Beautiful Niece]]: MadScientistsBeautifulDaughter: Dr. Brain's niece Elaina appears in the third game.



** ''Castle of Dr. Brain'': A robot hand in a glass box to get three required items. Three heads with different behaviours are available to use (and must all be used on the harder difficulties).

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** ''Castle of Dr. Brain'': A robot hand in a glass box to get three required items. Three heads with different behaviours behaviors are available to use (and must all be used on the harder difficulties).


Added DiffLines:

* ShoutOut: Solving one puzzle in the observatory in ''Castle of Dr. Brain'' causes the monolith from ''Literature/2001ASpaceOdyssey'' to appear. Once you solve all the puzzles and get access to Dr. Brain's laboratory, a voice clip saying "My god, it's full of puzzles!" plays.

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* KnightsAndKnaves: The ProgrammingGame in ''Castle'' requires you to deal with three robot heads, one of which always tells the truth (and will always follow your instructions), one of which always lies (and will always do the opposite of what you tell it to do), and one of which alternates (and will alternate between doing what you tell it and doing the opposite).

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/03_front.JPG]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Hey, this isn't Series/EureekasCastle!]]


** ''Castle of Dr. Brain'': A robot hand in a glass box to get three required items. Three heads with different behaviours are available to use (and must be used on the harder difficulties).

to:

** ''Castle of Dr. Brain'': A robot hand in a glass box to get three required items. Three heads with different behaviours are available to use (and must all be used on the harder difficulties).


All three games work perfectly under DOSBox (or Windows 3.1 under DOSBox in the case of the third game).

to:

All three games work perfectly under DOSBox UsefulNotes/DOSBox (or Windows 3.1 under DOSBox [=DOSBox=] in the case of the third game).


Sometime after the fourth game was released, the rights to the Dr. Brain series were acquired by Knowledge Adventure, creators of the ''VideoGame/JumpStart'' series, and released four games (''Dr. Brain Thinking Games: Puzzle Madness'' and ''IQ Adventure'', ''Dr. Brain: Action Reaction'', and ''The Adventures of Dr. Brain.'') The Knowledge Adventure games recast Dr. Brain as a twenty-something genius instead of mad scientist in his sixties. The ''Thinking Games'' sub-series had less of an emphasis on educational content and focused more on solving puzzles, while ''Action Reaction'' is a straight up first-person 3D platformer with a few puzzles thrown in.

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Sometime after the fourth game was released, the rights to the Dr. Brain series were acquired by Knowledge Adventure, creators of the ''VideoGame/JumpStart'' series, and they released four more games (''Dr. Brain Thinking Games: Puzzle Madness'' and ''IQ Adventure'', ''Dr. Brain: Action Reaction'', and ''The Adventures of Dr. Brain.'') The Knowledge Adventure games recast Dr. Brain as a twenty-something genius instead of mad scientist in his sixties. The ''Thinking Games'' sub-series had less of an emphasis on educational content and focused more on solving puzzles, while ''Action Reaction'' is a straight up first-person 3D platformer with a few puzzles thrown in.


The ''Dr. Brain'' series of games from are puzzle-based games from {{Creator/Sierra}}. Created by ''VideoGame/QuestForGlory'' co-designer Corey Cole, the series is one of the few examples of {{Edutainment Game}}s which are actually good games in their own right.

to:

The ''Dr. Brain'' series of games from are puzzle-based games from {{Creator/Sierra}}. Created by ''VideoGame/QuestForGlory'' co-designer Corey Cole, the series is one of the few examples of {{Edutainment Game}}s which are actually good games in their own right.


The ''Dr. Brain'' series of games from {{Creator/Sierra}} are puzzle-based games and one of the few examples of {{Edutainment Game}}s which are actually good games in their own right.

to:

The ''Dr. Brain'' series of games from {{Creator/Sierra}} from are puzzle-based games and from {{Creator/Sierra}}. Created by ''VideoGame/QuestForGlory'' co-designer Corey Cole, the series is one of the few examples of {{Edutainment Game}}s which are actually good games in their own right.



The third and fourth games (''The Lost Mind of Dr. Brain'' and ''The Time-Warp of Dr. Brain'', respectively) went in a slightly different direction. Instead of offering a linear path through various kinds of puzzles, gameplay was made more "casual", with all puzzles available for play at any time. You had to complete each puzzle repeatedly a certain number of times to "finish" one area of the game, and the end-game puzzle was unlocked only once all areas were finished. However, you could keep playing the puzzles over and over again, at varying difficulties, at any time. While certainly more repetitive than the earlier games, these sequels offered both a more open-ended experience as well as more content for players who enjoyed one or more puzzles and wanted to play them repeatedly. Unfortunately for the more cerebral crowd, a good portion of the puzzles in both games were practically arcade games more than they were any sort of puzzle or at all educational in nature.

to:

The third and fourth games (''The Lost Mind of Dr. Brain'' and ''The Time-Warp of Dr. Brain'', respectively) went in a slightly different direction. Instead of offering a linear path through various kinds of puzzles, gameplay was made more "casual", with all puzzles available for play at any time. You had to complete each puzzle repeatedly a certain number of times to "finish" one area of the game, and the end-game puzzle was unlocked only once all areas were finished. However, you could keep playing the puzzles over and over again, at varying difficulties, at any time. While certainly more repetitive than the earlier games, these sequels offered both a more open-ended experience as well as more content for players who enjoyed one or more puzzles and wanted to play them repeatedly. Unfortunately for the more cerebral crowd, a good portion of the puzzles in both games were practically arcade games more than they were any sort of puzzle or at all educational in nature.
nature. Needless to say, Corey Cole had nothing to do with either of these games.


Sometime after the fourth game was released, the rights to the Dr. Brain series were acquired by Knowledge Adventure, creators of the ''VideoGame/JumpStart'' series, and released four games (''Dr. Brain Thinking Games: Puzzle Madness'' and ''IQ Adventure'', ''Dr. Brain: Action Reaction'', and ''The Adventures of Dr. Brain.'') The Knowledge Adventure games recast Dr. Brain as a twenty-something genius instead of mad scientist in his sixties. The ''Thinking Games'' sub-series had less of an emphasis on education content and focused more on solving puzzles, while ''Action Reaction'' is a straight up first-person 3D platformer with a few puzzles thrown in.

to:

Sometime after the fourth game was released, the rights to the Dr. Brain series were acquired by Knowledge Adventure, creators of the ''VideoGame/JumpStart'' series, and released four games (''Dr. Brain Thinking Games: Puzzle Madness'' and ''IQ Adventure'', ''Dr. Brain: Action Reaction'', and ''The Adventures of Dr. Brain.'') The Knowledge Adventure games recast Dr. Brain as a twenty-something genius instead of mad scientist in his sixties. The ''Thinking Games'' sub-series had less of an emphasis on education educational content and focused more on solving puzzles, while ''Action Reaction'' is a straight up first-person 3D platformer with a few puzzles thrown in.


The first two games, ''Castle Of Dr Brain'' and ''The Island Of Dr Brain'' were made for MS-DOS using 256-colour VGA graphics, support for common sound cards and shipped on floppy disks.

to:

Sometime after the fourth game was released, the rights to the Dr. Brain series were acquired by Knowledge Adventure, creators of the ''VideoGame/JumpStart'' series, and released four games (''Dr. Brain Thinking Games: Puzzle Madness'' and ''IQ Adventure'', ''Dr. Brain: Action Reaction'', and ''The Adventures of Dr. Brain.'') The Knowledge Adventure games recast Dr. Brain as a twenty-something genius instead of mad scientist in his sixties. The ''Thinking Games'' sub-series had less of an emphasis on education content and focused more on solving puzzles, while ''Action Reaction'' is a straight up first-person 3D platformer with a few puzzles thrown in.

The first two games, ''Castle Of Dr Dr. Brain'' and ''The Island Of Dr Dr. Brain'' were made for MS-DOS using 256-colour VGA graphics, support for common sound cards and shipped on floppy disks.

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