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* In the Franchise/{{Nasuverse}}, in particularly ''Fate/KOHA-Ace'', Ieyasu is a hypothetical Servant, only mentioned by Nobunaga. At first he looks like an unassuming wimp (he looks like [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/typemoon/images/5/5a/TokugawaKH.png/revision/latest?cb=20150818013927 this,]] seriously). He has no skill whatsoever, but has a Noble Phantasm that lets him take stats of one of the seven classes. [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/typemoon/images/0/00/Tokugawaclasses.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20150818014133 For instance,]] if he took on the Lancer class, he'll assume the form of UsefulNotes/HondaTadakatsu, and if it's Saber, it would be UsefulNotes/YagyuJubei (based on how he's taught by Yagyu Munenori, who's a Servant in ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder''). It is also implied that this Ieyasu is one of his kagemusha when the real Ieyasu died early.

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* In the Franchise/{{Nasuverse}}, in particularly ''Fate/KOHA-Ace'', Ieyasu is a hypothetical Servant, only mentioned by Nobunaga. At first he looks like an unassuming wimp (he looks like [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/typemoon/images/5/5a/TokugawaKH.png/revision/latest?cb=20150818013927 this,]] seriously). He has no skill whatsoever, but has a Noble Phantasm that lets him take stats of one of the seven classes. [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/typemoon/images/0/00/Tokugawaclasses.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20150818014133 For instance,]] if he took on the Lancer class, he'll assume the form of UsefulNotes/HondaTadakatsu, and if it's Saber, it would be UsefulNotes/YagyuJubei (based on how he's taught by Yagyu Munenori, who's a Servant in ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder'').''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder'', although he also sports the EyepatchOfPower usually wielded by Munenori's son Mitsuyoshi, the more famous Jubei). It is also implied that this Ieyasu is one of his kagemusha when the real Ieyasu died early.


* In the ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'' series, Ieyasu is stated to have been a member of the Assassin Brotherhood, with the implication that he was likely the local head of the Japanese Branch.

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* In the ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'' series, Ieyasu is stated to have been a member of the Assassin Brotherhood, with the implication that he was likely the local head of the Japanese Branch.
Branch. As such, it meant that the Assassins effectively ruled Japan through the Tokugawa Dynasty all the way until the Meiji Restoration (stated to be a StagedPopulistUprising by the Templar faction).



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* In the ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'' series, Ieyasu is stated to have been a member of the Assassin Brotherhood, with the implication that he was likely the local head of the Japanese Branch.

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!!{{Toys}}
* The last figure to be released in the ''Franchise/SDGundam BB Senshi'' model line ''Toys/SDSengokudenBushinKourinHen'', Tokugawa Ieyasu Gundam, is based on Tokugawa Ieyasu.


** The fifth game, which is a SoftReboot, shows him in his younger self as Takechiyo who is a hostage of the Imagawa clan. His first wife, Sena, also appears as a playable character.

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** The fifth game, which is a SoftReboot, shows him in his younger self as Takechiyo who is a hostage of the Imagawa clan. Compared to his 'old man' usual design and Nobunaga and Hideyoshi's younger selves, Ieyasu's new design [[IWasQuiteALooker has the most stark difference]]: he was kind of a willowy {{Bishonen}}, but still handles himself well in battle using [[DualWielding twin katana]]. His first wife, Sena, also appears as a playable character.character (and also looking older than him).


** ( What's more, he alongside UsefulNotes/UesugiKenshin is voiced by the long-time villain seiyuu Creator/JojiNakata.

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** ( What's more, he alongside UsefulNotes/UesugiKenshin is voiced by the long-time villain seiyuu Creator/JojiNakata.Creator/JojiNakata.
** The fifth game, which is a SoftReboot, shows him in his younger self as Takechiyo who is a hostage of the Imagawa clan. His first wife, Sena, also appears as a playable character.


* ''Anime/BattleGirlsTimeParadox'' presents a {{gender flip}}ped Ieyasu as appearing sweet, but actually being the most underhanded character in the series. She's not opposed to cheating, and is actively planning to take the Crimson Armor for herself once Nobunaga completes it.



* Franchise/OnePiece likens him to Admiral Aokiji for their patience and wisdom of knowing when to strike and when not to. His fellow admirals Akainu and Kizaru are given to similarities between Oda Nobunaga and Totoyomi Hideyoshi, respectively.

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* Franchise/OnePiece ''Franchise/OnePiece'' likens him to Admiral Aokiji for their patience and wisdom of knowing when to strike and when not to. His fellow admirals Akainu and Kizaru are given to similarities between Oda Nobunaga and Totoyomi Hideyoshi, respectively.



* ''Anime/SengokuOtome'' presents a {{gender flip}}ped Ieyasu as appearing sweet, but actually being the most underhanded character in the series. She's not opposed to cheating, and is actively planning to take the Crimson Armor for herself once Nobunaga completes it.

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* ''Anime/SengokuOtome'' presents a {{gender flip}}ped Ieyasu as appearing sweet, but actually being the most underhanded character in the series. She's not opposed to cheating, and is actively planning to take the Crimson Armor for herself once Nobunaga completes it.


While Ieyasu did all he could to ensure his legacy would last very long and stabilizing the country, it was also his actions to do so that eventually caused his shogunate's downfall: In order to win Sekigahara, Ieyasu promised those who were loyal to him to be heavily rewarded, and then [[CruelMercy applied heavy punishment without any deaths towards his defeated opponents]], chief amongst these 'losers' were the Western clans, Mouri, Shimazu and Chosokabe. And one of his chief policies after unification of Japan is to close the country from any foreign trades except a few foreign countries, sealing off Japan from outer influences, which worked wonders for Japan's inner growth, but came to bit them in the ass when American fleet under Matthew Perry threatened his descendants to open the borders or else they'll overwhelm Japan with their superior technology. And the Mouri, Shimazu and Chosokabe, unhappy with these changes and still bearing the grudges over their treatment from Ieyasu, decided to strike back, leading to the UsefulNotes/MeijiRestoration and the end of the Ieyasu's legacy after 200+ years of ruling.

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While Ieyasu did all he could to ensure his legacy would last very long and stabilizing the country, [[HoistByHisOwnPetard it was also his actions to do so that eventually caused his shogunate's downfall: downfall]]: In order to win Sekigahara, Ieyasu promised those who were loyal to him to be heavily rewarded, and then [[CruelMercy applied heavy punishment without any deaths towards his defeated opponents]], chief amongst these 'losers' were the Western clans, Mouri, Shimazu and Chosokabe. And one of his chief policies after unification of Japan is to close the country from any foreign trades except a few foreign countries, sealing off Japan from outer influences, which worked wonders for Japan's inner growth, but came to bit them in the ass when American fleet under Matthew Perry threatened his descendants to open the borders or else they'll overwhelm Japan with their superior technology. And the Mouri, Shimazu and Chosokabe, unhappy with these changes and still bearing the grudges over their treatment from Ieyasu, [[TheDogBitesBack decided to strike back, back]], leading to the UsefulNotes/MeijiRestoration and the end of the Ieyasu's legacy after 200+ years of ruling.

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While Ieyasu did all he could to ensure his legacy would last very long and stabilizing the country, it was also his actions to do so that eventually caused his shogunate's downfall: In order to win Sekigahara, Ieyasu promised those who were loyal to him to be heavily rewarded, and then [[CruelMercy applied heavy punishment without any deaths towards his defeated opponents]], chief amongst these 'losers' were the Western clans, Mouri, Shimazu and Chosokabe. And one of his chief policies after unification of Japan is to close the country from any foreign trades except a few foreign countries, sealing off Japan from outer influences, which worked wonders for Japan's inner growth, but came to bit them in the ass when American fleet under Matthew Perry threatened his descendants to open the borders or else they'll overwhelm Japan with their superior technology. And the Mouri, Shimazu and Chosokabe, unhappy with these changes and still bearing the grudges over their treatment from Ieyasu, decided to strike back, leading to the UsefulNotes/MeijiRestoration and the end of the Ieyasu's legacy after 200+ years of ruling.

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* ''VideoGame/SekiroShadowsDieTwice'' takes place during the Tokugawa Shogunate with the backstory being that the Ashina succeeded in a coup to resist the unification of Japan. While Ieyasu himself never makes an appearance, the threat posed by his army (referred to as the "interior ministry") is hanging over the heads of the Ashina fighters like a Sword of Damocles, and is the reason Genichiro Ashina turned into a WellIntentionedExtremist.


* One of the few works where Ieyasu is arguably the villain would be in Futaro Yamada's ''The Kouga Ninja Scrolls'', with Ieyasu pitting the warring Kouga and Iga ninja clans in a free-for-all simply to determine [[spoiler:who among his grandchildren would ascend to the Shogunate, setting off the tragic events for all participants.]] The manga and anime adaptation of the story, Manga/{{Basilisk}} takes this UpToEleven and {{Gonk}}s him up.

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* One of the few works where Ieyasu is arguably the villain would be in Futaro Yamada's ''The Kouga Ninja Scrolls'', with Ieyasu pitting the warring Kouga and Iga ninja clans in a free-for-all simply to determine [[spoiler:who among his grandchildren would ascend to the Shogunate, setting off the tragic events for all participants.]] ]]
**
The manga and anime adaptation of the story, Manga/{{Basilisk}} ''Manga/{{Basilisk}}'' takes this UpToEleven and {{Gonk}}s him up.



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* Ieyasu is the BigBad of ''Manga/Brave10'' although he works mostly through other people and shows himself to be a ruthless but frequently ineffective warlord given the story centres around one of his [[UsefulNotes/SanadaYukimura opponents]].



* In ''Anime/SaberMarionetteJ'', the Japoness is led by a man named Tokugawa Ieyasu. He looks like a normal old man, but flashback reveals that [[IWasQuiteALooker the man he was cloned from looks just as bishonen as the protagonist Otaru]], in fact, he look like an older version of him.



* Ieyasu is the BigBad of ''Manga/Brave10'' although he works mostly through other people and shows himself to be a ruthless but frequently ineffective warlord given the story centres around one of his [[UsefulNotes/SanadaYukimura opponents]].

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* Ieyasu is the BigBad of ''Manga/Brave10'' although he works mostly through other people and shows himself to be a ruthless but frequently ineffective warlord given the story centres around one of his [[UsefulNotes/SanadaYukimura opponents]].



!!Literature

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!!Literature
!!{{Literature}}



* In ''Anime/SaberMarionetteJ'', the Japoness is led by a man named Tokugawa Ieyasu. He looks like a normal old man, but flashback reveals that [[IWasQuiteALooker the man he was cloned from looks just as bishonen as the protagonist Otaru]], in fact, he look like an older version of him.


* Understandably, nearly every major {{Creator/NHK}} Taiga drama centering on the Azuchi-Momoyama period would involve him as a character, main or supporting:
** ''Kunitori Monogatari'' (国盗り物語, 1973), portrayed by Akira Terao as part of the supporting cast.
** Terao would later reprise this role in 2014's ''Gunshi Kanbei'' (軍師官兵衛), as a MagnificentBastard and [[BigBadEnsemble the final strategic rival]] of the titular Kuroda Kanbei--in contrast to SmugSnake UsefulNotes/IshidaMitsunari. Despite his [[ManipulativeBastard shifty and double-faced character]] throughout his screen-time (even driving a political and personal wedge between Kanbei and his son [[WellDoneSonGuy Nagamasa]]), [[WellIntentionedExtremist he seems very convinced]] that [[IDidWhatIHadToDo everything he does is to return stability to the nation]]. [[spoiler:After Sekigahara, he and Kanbei have a heart-to-heart about their intentions, with Kanbei [[GracefulLoser admitting defeat]] and acknowledging his supremacy, and Ieyasu assuring him of his genuine desire for good governance, [[DefeatMeansFriendship even offering him a spot]] as [[WeCanRuleTogether his own adviser]]. While Kanbei declines, Ieyasu clearly sees him as a WorthyOpponent, and privately sighs in relief that [[TheDreaded he no longer has to fight him]].]]
** ''Tokugawa Ieyasu'' (1983) has him as the main protagonist, spanning for his whole life.
** ''Dokuganryu Masamune'' (独眼竜政宗, 1987), as a competitor to the titular UsefulNotes/DateMasamune, portrayed by Masahiko Tsugawa. He would later reprise this role as first of the leads of 2000's ''Aoi: Tokugawa Sandai'' (葵 徳川三代)--and even in other period productions not of the NHK, being closely associated with the role.
** Understandably the BigBad of ''Sanadamaru'' (真田丸, 2016), as this story takes the perspective of his longtime rivals Sanada Masayuki and UsefulNotes/SanadaYukimura. The show see-saws a bit with his characterization, sometimes rendering him a SmugSnake with a dash of [[ManipulativeBastard manipulative brilliance]], and sometimes a fidgety and paranoid leader who's on alarm [[MiseryTrigger at the mere knowledge of fighting the Sanada]]. [[TheBadGuyWins He still wins in the end]], [[ForegoneConclusion obviously]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Kessen}}'' and ''VideoGame/KessenIII''. For the first game, Ieyasu is one of the protagonist and can go either sympathetic or unsympathetic, depending on whoever is picked as protagonist (Him or Mitsunari). In the third game, he is forever a second banana to Nobunaga since Nobunaga survived Honnoji and is the main protagonist.

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* Understandably, nearly every major {{Creator/NHK}} Taiga drama centering on the Azuchi-Momoyama period would involve him as a character, main or supporting:
** ''Kunitori Monogatari'' (国盗り物語, 1973), portrayed by Akira Terao as part of the supporting cast.
** Terao would later reprise this role in 2014's ''Gunshi Kanbei'' (軍師官兵衛), as a MagnificentBastard and [[BigBadEnsemble the final strategic rival]] of the titular Kuroda Kanbei--in contrast to SmugSnake UsefulNotes/IshidaMitsunari. Despite his [[ManipulativeBastard shifty and double-faced character]] throughout his screen-time (even driving a political and personal wedge between Kanbei and his son [[WellDoneSonGuy Nagamasa]]), [[WellIntentionedExtremist he seems very convinced]] that [[IDidWhatIHadToDo everything he does is to return stability to the nation]]. [[spoiler:After Sekigahara, he and Kanbei have a heart-to-heart about their intentions, with Kanbei [[GracefulLoser admitting defeat]] and acknowledging his supremacy, and Ieyasu assuring him of his genuine desire for good governance, [[DefeatMeansFriendship even offering him a spot]] as [[WeCanRuleTogether his own adviser]]. While Kanbei declines, Ieyasu clearly sees him as a WorthyOpponent, and privately sighs in relief that [[TheDreaded he no longer has to fight him]].]]
** ''Tokugawa Ieyasu'' (1983) has him as the main protagonist, spanning for his whole life.
** ''Dokuganryu Masamune'' (独眼竜政宗, 1987), as a competitor to the titular UsefulNotes/DateMasamune, portrayed by Masahiko Tsugawa. He would later reprise this role as first of the leads of 2000's ''Aoi: Tokugawa Sandai'' (葵 徳川三代)--and even in other period productions not of the NHK, being closely associated with the role.
** Understandably the BigBad of ''Sanadamaru'' (真田丸, 2016), as this story takes the perspective of his longtime rivals Sanada Masayuki and UsefulNotes/SanadaYukimura. The show see-saws a bit with his characterization, sometimes rendering him a SmugSnake with a dash of [[ManipulativeBastard manipulative brilliance]], and sometimes a fidgety and paranoid leader who's on alarm [[MiseryTrigger at the mere knowledge of fighting the Sanada]]. [[TheBadGuyWins He still wins in the end]], [[ForegoneConclusion obviously]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Kessen}}'' and ''VideoGame/KessenIII''. For the first game, Ieyasu is one of the protagonist and can go either sympathetic or unsympathetic, depending on whoever is picked as protagonist (Him or Mitsunari). In the third game, he is forever a second banana to Nobunaga since Nobunaga survived Honnoji and is the main protagonist.

!!AnimeAndManga



* ''VideoGame/SamuraiWarriors'': Ieyasu starts out as some sort of cowardly FatBastard SmugSnake NPC in the first game, but by the expansion, he grew some competence (despite still being NPC) and sympathy. And in the second game, he became playable, got a spear cannon for weapon and can be a Fat Gentleman. Later games then give him a more virtuous side he is forced to give up, forcing him to resort to devious methods in order to secure peace; Ieyasu himself says to others that he deserves to be hated for it. One thing that's been rather consistent with him is that he's AFatherToHisMen all the way.
** ''VideoGame/PokemonConquest'' features Ieyasu as he appears in ''VideoGame/WarriorsOrochi''. Here he is dubbed the Warlord of Valora, the Steel-type nation. He's portrayed in a positive light, disagreeing with Nobunaga's methods but joining his team to keep his nation safe, and warmly congratulates the hero upon their victory. His signature Pokémon in this is Aggron [[spoiler: and eventually Registeel, if you play your cards right]].
** ( What's more, he alongside UsefulNotes/UesugiKenshin is voiced by the long-time villain seiyuu Creator/JojiNakata.
* Ieyasu is mentioned in ''VideoGame/OnimushaDawnOfDreams'' as Soki's true father. However, Soki thinks he's just a useless lapdog to Hideyoshi. In ''Soul'', Ieyasu finally makes an appearence as a Genma-aligned Daimyo: surprisingly enough, he's shown as a {{Bishonen}} in youth, and as a gruff but still attractive man wielding [[OddlyShapedSword a triple-bladed katana]].



* ''VideoGame/SengokuBasara'' has an...interesting take on Ieyasu. Early on in the series, he's a short, plump, impatient little brat; and while he's virtuous, he's also rather incompetent, relies too much on Tadakatsu, and [[JamesBondage gets kidnapped way too often]]. But in the third game, [[ShesAllGrownUp he grew up]], [[TookALevelInBadass took massive levels in badass]] and became one of the main protagonists.
** In his first incarnation Takeda Shingen drives the point home by addressing him as Takechiyo, the ''childhood name'' he used before coming of age (Ieyasu is technically his adult name, though historically he changed his name to "Tokugawa Ieyasu" much later).
*** In both forms of young and tall, he's voiced by Creator/ToruOkawa. Very much PlayingAgainstType too, since Okawa is mostly doing gruff old men, but Ieyasu here was a kid before he turned into a young adult. And he's been doing him since day one.
* In ''Anime/SaberMarionetteJ'', the Japoness is led by a man named Tokugawa Ieyasu. He looks like a normal old man, but flashback reveals that [[IWasQuiteALooker the man he was cloned from looks just as bishonen as the protagonist Otaru]], in fact, he look like an older version of him.
* ''Saihai no Yukue'', an ''Franchise/AceAttorney''-like game based on Sengoku era (by Koei) features Ieyasu as a FatBastard antagonist, while our protagonist is the {{Bishonen}} Ishida Mitsunari. Though, [[spoiler:in the end, it's subverted that Ieyasu was suckered by the true villain of the series: Lady Yodo.]]
* The Japanese campaign of ''VideoGame/AgeOfEmpiresIII: The Asian Dynasties'' is about his rise to power, with help from the player character, Sakuma Kichiro. He is also the leader of the Japanese if they are system players.
* One of the few works where Ieyasu is arguably the villain would be in Futaro Yamada's ''The Kouga Ninja Scrolls'', with Ieyasu pitting the warring Kouga and Iga ninja clans in a free-for-all simply to determine [[spoiler:who among his grandchildren would ascend to the Shogunate, setting off the tragic events for all participants.]] The manga and anime adaptation of the story, Manga/{{Basilisk}} takes this UpToEleven and {{Gonk}}s him up.
* Tokugawa is the leader of the Japanese civilization in the second, third, and fourth installments of the ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'' series of games; he is noted for being particularly isolationist in ''IV''. He gets replaced by Nobunaga in ''V''.
* The character of Toranaga in James Clavell's novel ''Literature/{{Shogun}}'' is a NoCelebritiesWereHarmed version of Ieyasu. He is one of the central characters.
* Ieyasu shows up as a minor character in ''Literature/{{Taiko}}'', spending most of the book as Nobunaga's ally.



* One of the main ''daimyos'' -clan leaders- in ''VideoGame/ShogunTotalWar'' and its successor, ''VideoGame/TotalWarShogun2''.
* One of the warring leaders opposing the UsefulNotes/TakedaShingen clan in the film ''Film/{{Kagemusha}}''.
* ''VideoGame/DeaeTonosamaAppareIchiban'' has him as the first boss, using rocket punches and beams against the player characters, because he has been possessed by aliens. Also, his name is spelled in-game "'''YEAH'''yasu", with Western alphabet and all (while the final boss is Oda '''NO'''bunaga). It's kind of [[WidgetSeries a weird game]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Nioh}}'' also has Tokugawa Ieyasu in it as the BigGood of the game, though he can veer to a ruthless PragmaticHero and WellIntentionedExtremist, which is actually closer to how it's like in real life. He's a tremendous help to William, which is another touch in with history, where the historical William Adams/Miura Anjin would end up on friendly terms with the Tokugawa clan.
* In the Franchise/{{Nasuverse}}, in particularly ''Fate/KOHA-Ace'', Ieyasu is a hypothetical Servant, only mentioned by Nobunaga. At first he looks like an unassuming wimp (he looks like [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/typemoon/images/5/5a/TokugawaKH.png/revision/latest?cb=20150818013927 this,]] seriously). He has no skill whatsoever, but has a Noble Phantasm that lets him take stats of one of the seven classes. [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/typemoon/images/0/00/Tokugawaclasses.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20150818014133 For instance,]] if he took on the Lancer class, he'll assume the form of UsefulNotes/HondaTadakatsu, and if it's Saber, it would be UsefulNotes/YagyuJubei (based on how he's taught by Yagyu Munenori, who's a Servant in ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder''). It is also implied that this Ieyasu is one of his kagemusha when the real Ieyasu died early.
** He is also mentioned quite a lot within background material of ''Grand Order'', especially in the backstory of Chacha ([[UsefulNotes/ToyotomiHideyoshi Hideyoshi]]'s chief concubine, [[UsefulNotes/OdaNobunaga Nobunaga's niece]]), where she considers him the one who kickstarted the trend of branding her the wrecker of Toyotomi household and as a result, she thoroughly hates him and tends to make comments that anything from Tokugawa should die.
** The aforementioned game's event, "Tokugawa Kaiten Labyrinth" is named after his clan, but Ieyasu was completely absent from it. However, it being set in the [[RoyalHarem Ooku]] of the Bakufu he established, his major female follower/influencer [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Kasuga Lady Kasuga]] features (albeit in a weird CompositeCharacter situation with the Indian goddess Parvati)--together with Yagyu Munenori.

to:

* One of the main ''daimyos'' -clan leaders- in ''VideoGame/ShogunTotalWar'' and its successor, ''VideoGame/TotalWarShogun2''.
* One of the warring leaders opposing the UsefulNotes/TakedaShingen clan in the film ''Film/{{Kagemusha}}''.
* ''VideoGame/DeaeTonosamaAppareIchiban'' has him as the first boss, using rocket punches and beams against the player characters, because he has been possessed by aliens. Also, his name is spelled in-game "'''YEAH'''yasu", with Western alphabet and all (while the final boss is Oda '''NO'''bunaga). It's kind of [[WidgetSeries a weird game]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Nioh}}'' also has Tokugawa Ieyasu in it as the BigGood of the game, though he can veer to a ruthless PragmaticHero and WellIntentionedExtremist, which is actually closer to how it's like in real life. He's a tremendous help to William, which is another touch in with history, where the historical William Adams/Miura Anjin would end up on friendly terms with the Tokugawa clan.
* In the Franchise/{{Nasuverse}}, in particularly ''Fate/KOHA-Ace'', Ieyasu is a hypothetical Servant, only mentioned by Nobunaga. At first he looks like an unassuming wimp (he looks like [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/typemoon/images/5/5a/TokugawaKH.png/revision/latest?cb=20150818013927 this,]] seriously). He has no skill whatsoever, but has a Noble Phantasm that lets him take stats of one of the seven classes. [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/typemoon/images/0/00/Tokugawaclasses.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20150818014133 For instance,]] if he took on the Lancer class, he'll assume the form of UsefulNotes/HondaTadakatsu, and if it's Saber, it would be UsefulNotes/YagyuJubei (based on how he's taught by Yagyu Munenori, who's a Servant in ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder''). It is also implied that this Ieyasu is one of his kagemusha when the real Ieyasu died early.
** He is also mentioned quite a lot within background material of ''Grand Order'', especially in the backstory of Chacha ([[UsefulNotes/ToyotomiHideyoshi Hideyoshi]]'s chief concubine, [[UsefulNotes/OdaNobunaga Nobunaga's niece]]), where she considers him the one who kickstarted the trend of branding her the wrecker of Toyotomi household and as a result, she thoroughly hates him and tends to make comments that anything from Tokugawa should die.
** The aforementioned game's event, "Tokugawa Kaiten Labyrinth" is named after his clan, but Ieyasu was completely absent from it. However, it being set in the [[RoyalHarem Ooku]] of the Bakufu he established, his major female follower/influencer [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Kasuga Lady Kasuga]] features (albeit in a weird CompositeCharacter situation with the Indian goddess Parvati)--together with Yagyu Munenori.

!!ComicBooks


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!!Literature

* One of the few works where Ieyasu is arguably the villain would be in Futaro Yamada's ''The Kouga Ninja Scrolls'', with Ieyasu pitting the warring Kouga and Iga ninja clans in a free-for-all simply to determine [[spoiler:who among his grandchildren would ascend to the Shogunate, setting off the tragic events for all participants.]] The manga and anime adaptation of the story, Manga/{{Basilisk}} takes this UpToEleven and {{Gonk}}s him up.
* The character of Toranaga in James Clavell's novel ''Literature/{{Shogun}}'' is a NoCelebritiesWereHarmed version of Ieyasu. He is one of the central characters.
* Ieyasu shows up as a minor character in ''Literature/{{Taiko}}'', spending most of the book as Nobunaga's ally.

!!LiveActionTV

* Understandably, nearly every major {{Creator/NHK}} Taiga drama centering on the Azuchi-Momoyama period would involve him as a character, main or supporting:
** ''Kunitori Monogatari'' (国盗り物語, 1973), portrayed by Akira Terao as part of the supporting cast.
** Terao would later reprise this role in 2014's ''Gunshi Kanbei'' (軍師官兵衛), as a MagnificentBastard and [[BigBadEnsemble the final strategic rival]] of the titular Kuroda Kanbei--in contrast to SmugSnake UsefulNotes/IshidaMitsunari. Despite his [[ManipulativeBastard shifty and double-faced character]] throughout his screen-time (even driving a political and personal wedge between Kanbei and his son [[WellDoneSonGuy Nagamasa]]), [[WellIntentionedExtremist he seems very convinced]] that [[IDidWhatIHadToDo everything he does is to return stability to the nation]]. [[spoiler:After Sekigahara, he and Kanbei have a heart-to-heart about their intentions, with Kanbei [[GracefulLoser admitting defeat]] and acknowledging his supremacy, and Ieyasu assuring him of his genuine desire for good governance, [[DefeatMeansFriendship even offering him a spot]] as [[WeCanRuleTogether his own adviser]]. While Kanbei declines, Ieyasu clearly sees him as a WorthyOpponent, and privately sighs in relief that [[TheDreaded he no longer has to fight him]].]]
** ''Tokugawa Ieyasu'' (1983) has him as the main protagonist, spanning for his whole life.
** ''Dokuganryu Masamune'' (独眼竜政宗, 1987), as a competitor to the titular UsefulNotes/DateMasamune, portrayed by Masahiko Tsugawa. He would later reprise this role as first of the leads of 2000's ''Aoi: Tokugawa Sandai'' (葵 徳川三代)--and even in other period productions not of the NHK, being closely associated with the role.
** Understandably the BigBad of ''Sanadamaru'' (真田丸, 2016), as this story takes the perspective of his longtime rivals Sanada Masayuki and UsefulNotes/SanadaYukimura. The show see-saws a bit with his characterization, sometimes rendering him a SmugSnake with a dash of [[ManipulativeBastard manipulative brilliance]], and sometimes a fidgety and paranoid leader who's on alarm [[MiseryTrigger at the mere knowledge of fighting the Sanada]]. [[TheBadGuyWins He still wins in the end]], [[ForegoneConclusion obviously]].

!!VideoGames

* ''VideoGame/{{Kessen}}'' and ''VideoGame/KessenIII''. For the first game, Ieyasu is one of the protagonist and can go either sympathetic or unsympathetic, depending on whoever is picked as protagonist (Him or Mitsunari). In the third game, he is forever a second banana to Nobunaga since Nobunaga survived Honnoji and is the main protagonist.
* ''VideoGame/SamuraiWarriors'': Ieyasu starts out as some sort of cowardly FatBastard SmugSnake NPC in the first game, but by the expansion, he grew some competence (despite still being NPC) and sympathy. And in the second game, he became playable, got a spear cannon for weapon and can be a Fat Gentleman. Later games then give him a more virtuous side he is forced to give up, forcing him to resort to devious methods in order to secure peace; Ieyasu himself says to others that he deserves to be hated for it. One thing that's been rather consistent with him is that he's AFatherToHisMen all the way.
** ''VideoGame/PokemonConquest'' features Ieyasu as he appears in ''VideoGame/WarriorsOrochi''. Here he is dubbed the Warlord of Valora, the Steel-type nation. He's portrayed in a positive light, disagreeing with Nobunaga's methods but joining his team to keep his nation safe, and warmly congratulates the hero upon their victory. His signature Pokémon in this is Aggron [[spoiler: and eventually Registeel, if you play your cards right]].
** ( What's more, he alongside UsefulNotes/UesugiKenshin is voiced by the long-time villain seiyuu Creator/JojiNakata.
* Ieyasu is mentioned in ''VideoGame/OnimushaDawnOfDreams'' as Soki's true father. However, Soki thinks he's just a useless lapdog to Hideyoshi. In ''Soul'', Ieyasu finally makes an appearence as a Genma-aligned Daimyo: surprisingly enough, he's shown as a {{Bishonen}} in youth, and as a gruff but still attractive man wielding [[OddlyShapedSword a triple-bladed katana]].
* ''VideoGame/SengokuBasara'' has an...interesting take on Ieyasu. Early on in the series, he's a short, plump, impatient little brat; and while he's virtuous, he's also rather incompetent, relies too much on Tadakatsu, and [[JamesBondage gets kidnapped way too often]]. But in the third game, [[ShesAllGrownUp he grew up]], [[TookALevelInBadass took massive levels in badass]] and became one of the main protagonists.
** In his first incarnation Takeda Shingen drives the point home by addressing him as Takechiyo, the ''childhood name'' he used before coming of age (Ieyasu is technically his adult name, though historically he changed his name to "Tokugawa Ieyasu" much later).
*** In both forms of young and tall, he's voiced by Creator/ToruOkawa. Very much PlayingAgainstType too, since Okawa is mostly doing gruff old men, but Ieyasu here was a kid before he turned into a young adult. And he's been doing him since day one.
* In ''Anime/SaberMarionetteJ'', the Japoness is led by a man named Tokugawa Ieyasu. He looks like a normal old man, but flashback reveals that [[IWasQuiteALooker the man he was cloned from looks just as bishonen as the protagonist Otaru]], in fact, he look like an older version of him.
* ''Saihai no Yukue'', an ''Franchise/AceAttorney''-like game based on Sengoku era (by Koei) features Ieyasu as a FatBastard antagonist, while our protagonist is the {{Bishonen}} Ishida Mitsunari. Though, [[spoiler:in the end, it's subverted that Ieyasu was suckered by the true villain of the series: Lady Yodo.]]
* The Japanese campaign of ''VideoGame/AgeOfEmpiresIII: The Asian Dynasties'' is about his rise to power, with help from the player character, Sakuma Kichiro. He is also the leader of the Japanese if they are system players.
* Tokugawa is the leader of the Japanese civilization in the second, third, and fourth installments of the ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'' series of games; he is noted for being particularly isolationist in ''IV''. He gets replaced by Nobunaga in ''V''.
* One of the main ''daimyos'' -clan leaders- in ''VideoGame/ShogunTotalWar'' and its successor, ''VideoGame/TotalWarShogun2''.
* One of the warring leaders opposing the UsefulNotes/TakedaShingen clan in the film ''Film/{{Kagemusha}}''.
* ''VideoGame/DeaeTonosamaAppareIchiban'' has him as the first boss, using rocket punches and beams against the player characters, because he has been possessed by aliens. Also, his name is spelled in-game "'''YEAH'''yasu", with Western alphabet and all (while the final boss is Oda '''NO'''bunaga). It's kind of [[WidgetSeries a weird game]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Nioh}}'' also has Tokugawa Ieyasu in it as the BigGood of the game, though he can veer to a ruthless PragmaticHero and WellIntentionedExtremist, which is actually closer to how it's like in real life. He's a tremendous help to William, which is another touch in with history, where the historical William Adams/Miura Anjin would end up on friendly terms with the Tokugawa clan.
* In the Franchise/{{Nasuverse}}, in particularly ''Fate/KOHA-Ace'', Ieyasu is a hypothetical Servant, only mentioned by Nobunaga. At first he looks like an unassuming wimp (he looks like [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/typemoon/images/5/5a/TokugawaKH.png/revision/latest?cb=20150818013927 this,]] seriously). He has no skill whatsoever, but has a Noble Phantasm that lets him take stats of one of the seven classes. [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/typemoon/images/0/00/Tokugawaclasses.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20150818014133 For instance,]] if he took on the Lancer class, he'll assume the form of UsefulNotes/HondaTadakatsu, and if it's Saber, it would be UsefulNotes/YagyuJubei (based on how he's taught by Yagyu Munenori, who's a Servant in ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder''). It is also implied that this Ieyasu is one of his kagemusha when the real Ieyasu died early.
** He is also mentioned quite a lot within background material of ''Grand Order'', especially in the backstory of Chacha ([[UsefulNotes/ToyotomiHideyoshi Hideyoshi]]'s chief concubine, [[UsefulNotes/OdaNobunaga Nobunaga's niece]]), where she considers him the one who kickstarted the trend of branding her the wrecker of Toyotomi household and as a result, she thoroughly hates him and tends to make comments that anything from Tokugawa should die.
** The aforementioned game's event, "Tokugawa Kaiten Labyrinth" is named after his clan, but Ieyasu was completely absent from it. However, it being set in the [[RoyalHarem Ooku]] of the Bakufu he established, his major female follower/influencer [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Kasuga Lady Kasuga]] features (albeit in a weird CompositeCharacter situation with the Indian goddess Parvati)--together with Yagyu Munenori.


* The Four Guardians of Tokugawa: Or [[FourIsDeath Tokugawa Shi-Tennou (Four Heavenly Kings/Death Gods)]]. These are considered [[BadassCrew the cream of the crop and most badass of any of Tokugawa's retainers]].

to:

* The Four Guardians of Tokugawa: Or [[FourIsDeath [[EliteFour Tokugawa Shi-Tennou (Four Heavenly Kings/Death Gods)]].Kings)]]. These are considered [[BadassCrew the cream of the crop and most badass of any of Tokugawa's retainers]].


After Toyotomi's death, Tokugawa grew to become the most powerful and influential man in Japan. As he had abstained from the Korean Campaign, his army was still in one piece, and was in fact growing, along with his wealth. In fact, in light of the Korean debacle, Tokugawa's wisdom in ''not'' sending his men to die pointlessly boosted his popularity, at the cost of the Toyotomi's. His name changes in the past also helped in some capacity. With his name now Tokugawa Ieyasu, he could claim descent from the Minamoto clan. Even the Matsudaira name still indicated nobility, whereas Toyotomi's peasant origin did him no favors. Popular opinion began to favor a ruler with an air of nobility like Tokugawa over a peasant-born ruler like Toyotomi. The latter's megalomania likely didn't help. However, many were unhappy about Tokugawa's perceived usurpation of Toyotomi's position, and this turmoil ultimately culminated in 1600 in the major battle of Sekigahara. Tokugawa led the forces of eastern Japan, while UsefulNotes/IshidaMitsunari led the forces of western Japan. Thanks in part to luck, Tokugawa scored a huge victory, and with it, the rule of all Japan.

to:

After Toyotomi's death, Tokugawa grew to become the most powerful and influential man in Japan. As he had abstained from the Korean Campaign, his army was still in one piece, and was in fact growing, along with his wealth. In fact, in light of the Korean debacle, Tokugawa's wisdom in ''not'' sending his men to die pointlessly boosted his popularity, at the cost of the Toyotomi's. His name changes in the past also helped in some capacity. With his name now Tokugawa Ieyasu, he could claim descent from the Minamoto clan. Even the Matsudaira name still indicated nobility, whereas Toyotomi's peasant origin did him no favors. Popular opinion began to favor a ruler with an air of nobility like Tokugawa over a peasant-born ruler like Toyotomi. The latter's megalomania likely didn't help. However, many were unhappy about Tokugawa's perceived usurpation of Toyotomi's position, position since they still believed that despite his megalomania and this peasant origin, Toyotomi was still the one that worked the hardest to unify Japan, saving them from endless, ceaseless civil war and thus the one who still has the rights to hold the throne. This turmoil ultimately culminated in 1600 in the major battle of Sekigahara. Tokugawa led the forces of eastern Japan, while UsefulNotes/IshidaMitsunari led the forces of western Japan. Thanks in part to luck, Tokugawa scored a huge victory, and with it, the rule of all Japan.

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