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He was Tory Prime Minister 1828-1830 and again for less than a month in 1838. He also named a third ministry: the short-lived first Cabinet of UsefulNotes/TheEarlOfDerby in 1852 was the first time the Protectionist wing of the Conservative Party had governed, and so had a lot of new names (e.g. UsefulNotes/BenjaminDisraeli); when these unfamiliar names were read out in the Lords, the ageing and hard-of-hearing Duke interjected, "Who? Who?", and behold! the First Derby Ministry is forever known as the "Who? Who? Ministry". His political career is much less famous and far less celebrated mostly because it casts him in a less-than-positive light by modern standards, such as [[http://www.thejc.com/news/uk-news/137984/revealed-why-wellington-was-no-friend-jews his anti-semitism]] which led him to veto a bill that provided increased rights for Jews[[note]]"... this is a Christian country and a Christian legislature, and that the effect of this measure would be to remove that peculiar character...I see no ground whatever for passing the Bill; and shall, therefore, vote against it."[[/note]]. Indeed his general opposition to parliamentary reform earned him the nickname the Iron Duke, and while [[AppropriatedAppellation later supporters appropriated this sobriquet]], it was originally an insult. So unpopular was the Duke, that his house windows were smashed by supporters angry at his opposition of a Reform Bill. In response, [[IResembleThatRemark the Duke put in place Iron shutters to better protect his home]]. Despite this, the 1832 Reform Bill was passed by the Whigs, though the Duke was bitter about its passage. Ironically, the impetus for the Reform Act partly came from a legislation to improve the lot of Catholics in Ireland [[HoistByHisOwnPetard which the Duke had passed]] in the teeth of serious opposition. Fearing increased rights for the Irish catholic community, a faction of the Tories allied with the Whigs to get the Reform Act passed.

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He was Tory Prime Minister 1828-1830 and again for less than a month in 1838.1834. He also named a third ministry: the short-lived first Cabinet of UsefulNotes/TheEarlOfDerby in 1852 was the first time the Protectionist wing of the Conservative Party had governed, and so had a lot of new names (e.g. UsefulNotes/BenjaminDisraeli); when these unfamiliar names were read out in the Lords, the ageing and hard-of-hearing Duke interjected, "Who? Who?", and behold! the First Derby Ministry is forever known as the "Who? Who? Ministry". His political career is much less famous and far less celebrated mostly because it casts him in a less-than-positive light by modern standards, such as [[http://www.thejc.com/news/uk-news/137984/revealed-why-wellington-was-no-friend-jews his anti-semitism]] which led him to veto a bill that provided increased rights for Jews[[note]]"... this is a Christian country and a Christian legislature, and that the effect of this measure would be to remove that peculiar character...I see no ground whatever for passing the Bill; and shall, therefore, vote against it."[[/note]]. Indeed his general opposition to parliamentary reform earned him the nickname the Iron Duke, and while [[AppropriatedAppellation later supporters appropriated this sobriquet]], it was originally an insult. So unpopular was the Duke, that his house windows were smashed by supporters angry at his opposition of a Reform Bill. In response, [[IResembleThatRemark the Duke put in place Iron shutters to better protect his home]]. Despite this, the 1832 Reform Bill was passed by the Whigs, though the Duke was bitter about its passage. Ironically, the impetus for the Reform Act partly came from a legislation to improve the lot of Catholics in Ireland [[HoistByHisOwnPetard which the Duke had passed]] in the teeth of serious opposition. Fearing increased rights for the Irish catholic community, a faction of the Tories allied with the Whigs to get the Reform Act passed.


* Appears as a secondary character in ''Literature/JonathanStrangeAndMrNorrell'', as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure with NervesOfSteel who regards the entire city of Brussels being teleported to the Great Plains of America with little more than a raised eyebrow, and whose management style (once he is convinced of Strange's usefulness) mostly consists of telling Strange what magical thing he wants done, then leaving Strange to sort out the details. Gets his own short story, "The Duke Of Wellington Misplaces His Horse", in the followup short story collection ''The Ladies of Grace Adieu''.

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* Appears as a secondary character in ''Literature/JonathanStrangeAndMrNorrell'', as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure with NervesOfSteel who regards the entire city of Brussels being teleported to the Great Plains of America just prior to the Battle of Waterloo (Strange having essentially panicked) with little more than a raised eyebrow, eyebrow and whose a request to one of his aides to go and enquire of some Native American warriors he sees riding past if they'd like to join the battle the next day. His management style (once he is convinced of Strange's usefulness) mostly consists of telling Strange what magical thing he wants done, then leaving Strange to sort out the details.details, which makes him both a difficult and a supportive authority figure to Strange: when the latter seems to go completely insane, Wellington retains unwavering faith in him (partly because he reckoned that Strange was a bit weird to begin with) and stating that he won't be a problem or a threat to Britain - as it turns out, [[spoiler: he's completely right]]. Gets his own short story, "The Duke Of Wellington Misplaces His Horse", in the followup short story collection ''The Ladies of Grace Adieu''.


* Appears in {{HoratioHornblower}} as Hornblower is married to the Duke's fictional youngest sister, Lady Barbara.

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* Appears in {{HoratioHornblower}} ''Literature/HoratioHornblower'' as Hornblower is married to the Duke's fictional youngest sister, Lady Barbara.


Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever 1st Duke of Wellington, KG KP GCB GCH PC FRS]] (1 May 1769 14 September 1852), was a British soldier and statesman, and one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain. His defeat of UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 put him in the top rank of Britain's military heroes. He is often referred to as one of the greatest English generals of all time, except that he was Irish. Indeed his real name is Arthur Wesley, he added the "lle" later. His supposed response (not recorded until after his death) to people pointing out his Irish birth was something along the lines of 'If a man is born in a stable, that doesn't make him a horse', a sentiment which didn't stop him marrying an Irish woman or the Irish building a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wellington_Monument,_Dublin 200 ft tall monument in his honor]]. To be fair, his comments stemmed from a dislike of the Protestant and often power-abusing Irish aristocracy rather than the "normal" Irish (Catholic or Protestant), whom he regarded as reasonably good soldiering material and thought no worse of than the "normal" English, Scottish or Welsh (which is to say, he didn't think of them very often).

His military career was rapid, reaching the rank of Colonel in 12 years thanks to the peculiar British system of purchasing promotions. Despite an extremely impressive military career in India, he did not come to real prominence until UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars,[[note]]Ironically, Napoleon too was not born in the nation that he is famous for being from; his birthplace had been transferred from theoretical Genoese sovereignty to French a mere two years before his birth (and he was originally called the much more Italian "Napoleone Buonaparte"), making the Napoleonic wars between the French led by a Corsican and the British led by several Irishmen, most notably Wellington, his brother Richard Lord Wellesley, and Lord Castlereagh. Also born the same year as Napoleon. Makes one wonder...[[/note]] and was promoted to the rank of Field Marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to the Congress of Vienna and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded one of the the allied armies which defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. He is also credited with the defeat of the French under Marshall Massena in the Third French Invasion of Portugal due to him ordering the construction of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_of_Torres_Vedras Lines of Torres Vedras]] (after one of the towns through which it passed), which is considered the most cost-effective fortification in military history - it was able to effectively accomplish its tactical (defend the Port of Lisbon[[note]]which was the communications gateway between the Anglo-Portuguese Army and the United Kingdom[[/note]]) and strategic (defend Portugal [[note]]for it was more easy to defend that country then advance into Spain, because he considered that Portugal gave him all necessary conditions[[/note]] [[note]]also, Portugal was for him more worthy of defense than Spain, due to the fact it had [[BindingAncientTreaty the oldest alliance]] with the United Kingdom and had offered the UK its full support since the Peninsular War first started, while Spain had at first offered its army and all its resources to aid France[[/note]]) objectives at a very low cost. In fact, Portugal had offered him the patent of Marshall General of the Portuguese Army, which gave control of said army when in joint operations with the British Army. He used that title to reorganize the Portuguese, who were a demotivated and deorganized RagtagBunchOfMisfits into a capable, cohesive, motivated and organized Army.

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Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever 1st Duke of Wellington, KG KP GCB GCH PC FRS]] (1 May 1769 14 September 1852), was a British soldier and statesman, and one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain. His defeat of UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 put him in the top rank of Britain's military heroes. He is often referred to as one of the greatest English generals of all time, except that he was Irish. Indeed his real name is Arthur Wesley, he added the "lle" later. His supposed response (not recorded until after his death) to people pointing out his Irish birth was something along the lines of 'If a man is born in a stable, that doesn't make him a horse', a sentiment which didn't stop him marrying an Irish woman or the Irish building a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wellington_Monument,_Dublin 200 ft tall monument in his honor]]. To be fair, his comments stemmed from a dislike of the Protestant and often power-abusing Irish aristocracy rather than the "normal" Irish (Catholic or Protestant), whom he regarded as reasonably good soldiering material and thought no worse of than the "normal" English, Scottish or Welsh (which is to say, he didn't think of them very often).

often), to the point where the Catholic Emancipation Act of 1832 was one of his key political achievements.

His military career rise through the ranks was rapid, reaching the rank of Colonel in 12 years thanks to the peculiar British system of purchasing promotions.promotions (there was an obligatory amount of time that had to be served before you could buy your way up to the next rank, but it was still fairly brief). Despite an extremely impressive military career in India, he did not come to real prominence until UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars,[[note]]Ironically, Napoleon too was not born in the nation that he is famous for being from; his birthplace had been transferred from theoretical Genoese sovereignty to French a mere two years before his birth (and he was originally called the much more Italian "Napoleone Buonaparte"), making the Napoleonic wars between the French led by a Corsican and the British led by several Irishmen, most notably Wellington, his brother Richard Lord Wellesley, and Lord Castlereagh. Also born the same year as Napoleon. Makes one wonder...[[/note]] and was promoted to the rank of Field Marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to the Congress of Vienna and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded one of the the allied armies which defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. He is also credited with the defeat of the French under Marshall Massena in the Third French Invasion of Portugal due to him ordering the construction of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_of_Torres_Vedras Lines of Torres Vedras]] (after one of the towns through which it passed), which is considered the most cost-effective fortification in military history - it was able to effectively accomplish its tactical (defend the Port of Lisbon[[note]]which was the communications gateway between the Anglo-Portuguese Army and the United Kingdom[[/note]]) and strategic (defend Portugal [[note]]for it was more easy to defend that country then advance into Spain, because he considered that Portugal gave him all necessary conditions[[/note]] [[note]]also, Portugal was for him more worthy of defense than Spain, due to the fact it had [[BindingAncientTreaty the oldest alliance]] with the United Kingdom and had offered the UK its full support since the Peninsular War first started, while Spain had at first offered its army and all its resources to aid France[[/note]]) objectives at a very low cost. In fact, Portugal had offered him the patent of Marshall General of the Portuguese Army, which gave control of said army when in joint operations with the British Army. He used that title to reorganize the Portuguese, who were a demotivated and deorganized RagtagBunchOfMisfits into a capable, cohesive, motivated and organized Army.



He was Tory Prime Minister 1828-1830 and again for less than a month in 1838. He also named a third ministry: the short-lived first Cabinet of UsefulNotes/TheEarlOfDerby in 1852 was the first time the Protectionist wing of the Conservative Party had governed, and so had a lot of new names (e.g. UsefulNotes/BenjaminDisraeli); when these unfamiliar names were read out in the Lords, the aging and hard-of-hearing Duke interjected, "Who? Who?", and behold! the First Derby Ministry is forever known as the "Who? Who? Ministry". His political career is much less famous and far less celebrated mostly because it casts him in a less-than-positive light by modern standards, such as [[http://www.thejc.com/news/uk-news/137984/revealed-why-wellington-was-no-friend-jews his anti-semitism]] which led him to veto a bill that provided increased rights for Jews[[note]]"... this is a Christian country and a Christian legislature, and that the effect of this measure would be to remove that peculiar character...I see no ground whatever for passing the Bill; and shall, therefore, vote against it."[[/note]]. Indeed his general opposition to parliamentary reform earned him the nickname the Iron Duke, and while [[AppropriatedAppellation later supporters appropriated this sobriquet]], it was originally an insult. So unpopular was the Duke, that his house windows were smashed by supporters angry at his opposition of a Reform Bill. In response, [[IResembleThatRemark the Duke put in place Iron shutters to better protect his home]]. Despite this, the 1832 Reform Bill was passed by the Whigs, though the Duke was bitter about its passage. Ironically, the impetus for the Reform Act partly came from a legislation to improve the lot of Catholics in Ireland [[HoistByHisOwnPetard which the Duke had passed]] in the teeth of serious opposition. Fearing increased rights for the Irish catholic community, a faction of the Tories allied with the Whigs to get the Reform Act passed.

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He was Tory Prime Minister 1828-1830 and again for less than a month in 1838. He also named a third ministry: the short-lived first Cabinet of UsefulNotes/TheEarlOfDerby in 1852 was the first time the Protectionist wing of the Conservative Party had governed, and so had a lot of new names (e.g. UsefulNotes/BenjaminDisraeli); when these unfamiliar names were read out in the Lords, the aging ageing and hard-of-hearing Duke interjected, "Who? Who?", and behold! the First Derby Ministry is forever known as the "Who? Who? Ministry". His political career is much less famous and far less celebrated mostly because it casts him in a less-than-positive light by modern standards, such as [[http://www.thejc.com/news/uk-news/137984/revealed-why-wellington-was-no-friend-jews his anti-semitism]] which led him to veto a bill that provided increased rights for Jews[[note]]"... this is a Christian country and a Christian legislature, and that the effect of this measure would be to remove that peculiar character...I see no ground whatever for passing the Bill; and shall, therefore, vote against it."[[/note]]. Indeed his general opposition to parliamentary reform earned him the nickname the Iron Duke, and while [[AppropriatedAppellation later supporters appropriated this sobriquet]], it was originally an insult. So unpopular was the Duke, that his house windows were smashed by supporters angry at his opposition of a Reform Bill. In response, [[IResembleThatRemark the Duke put in place Iron shutters to better protect his home]]. Despite this, the 1832 Reform Bill was passed by the Whigs, though the Duke was bitter about its passage. Ironically, the impetus for the Reform Act partly came from a legislation to improve the lot of Catholics in Ireland [[HoistByHisOwnPetard which the Duke had passed]] in the teeth of serious opposition. Fearing increased rights for the Irish catholic community, a faction of the Tories allied with the Whigs to get the Reform Act passed.

Added DiffLines:

** A later ''Blackadder'' TV movie has a more mellow depiction of the man at Waterloo, where he comes up with a Cunning Plan to beat Napoleon... only to get squashed flat by a time-machine.


His military career was rapid, reaching the rank of Colonel in 12 years thanks to the peculiar British system of purchasing promotions. Despite an extremely impressive military career in India, he did not come to real prominence until UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars,[[note]]Ironically, Napoleon too was not born in the nation that he is famous for being from; his birthplace had been transferred from theoretical Genoese sovereignty to French a mere two years before his birth (and he was originally called the much more Italian "Napoleone Buonaparte"), making the Napoleonic wars between the French led by a Corsican and the British led by several Irishmen, most notably Wellington, his brother Richard Lord Wellesley, and Lord Castlereagh. Also born the same year as Napoleon. Makes one wonder...[[/note]] and was promoted to the rank of Field Marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to the Congress of Vienna and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded one of the the allied armies which defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. He is also credited with the defeat of the French under Marshall Massena in the Third French Invasion of Portugal due to him ordering the construction of the [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_of_Torres_Vedras Lines of Torres Vedras]] (after one of the towns through which it passed), which is considered the most cost-effective fortification in military history - it was able to effectively accomplish its tactical (defend the Port of Lisbon[[note]]which was the communications gateway between the Anglo-Portuguese Army and the United Kingdom[[/note]]) and strategic (defend Portugal [[note]]for it was more easy to defend that country then advance into Spain, because he considered that Portugal gave him all necessary conditions[[/note]] [[note]]also, Portugal was for him more worthy of defense than Spain, due to the fact it had [[BindingAncientTreaty the oldest alliance]] with the United Kingdom and had offered the UK its full support since the Peninsular War first started, while Spain had at first offered its army and all its resources to aid France[[/note]]) objectives at a very low cost. In fact, Portugal had offered him the patent of Marshall General of the Portuguese Army, which gave control of said army when in joint operations with the British Army. He used that title to reorganize the Portuguese, who were a demotivated and deorganized RagtagBunchOfMisfits into a capable, cohesive, motivated and organized Army.

to:

His military career was rapid, reaching the rank of Colonel in 12 years thanks to the peculiar British system of purchasing promotions. Despite an extremely impressive military career in India, he did not come to real prominence until UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars,[[note]]Ironically, Napoleon too was not born in the nation that he is famous for being from; his birthplace had been transferred from theoretical Genoese sovereignty to French a mere two years before his birth (and he was originally called the much more Italian "Napoleone Buonaparte"), making the Napoleonic wars between the French led by a Corsican and the British led by several Irishmen, most notably Wellington, his brother Richard Lord Wellesley, and Lord Castlereagh. Also born the same year as Napoleon. Makes one wonder...[[/note]] and was promoted to the rank of Field Marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to the Congress of Vienna and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded one of the the allied armies which defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. He is also credited with the defeat of the French under Marshall Massena in the Third French Invasion of Portugal due to him ordering the construction of the [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_of_Torres_Vedras Lines of Torres Vedras]] (after one of the towns through which it passed), which is considered the most cost-effective fortification in military history - it was able to effectively accomplish its tactical (defend the Port of Lisbon[[note]]which was the communications gateway between the Anglo-Portuguese Army and the United Kingdom[[/note]]) and strategic (defend Portugal [[note]]for it was more easy to defend that country then advance into Spain, because he considered that Portugal gave him all necessary conditions[[/note]] [[note]]also, Portugal was for him more worthy of defense than Spain, due to the fact it had [[BindingAncientTreaty the oldest alliance]] with the United Kingdom and had offered the UK its full support since the Peninsular War first started, while Spain had at first offered its army and all its resources to aid France[[/note]]) objectives at a very low cost. In fact, Portugal had offered him the patent of Marshall General of the Portuguese Army, which gave control of said army when in joint operations with the British Army. He used that title to reorganize the Portuguese, who were a demotivated and deorganized RagtagBunchOfMisfits into a capable, cohesive, motivated and organized Army.


* {{Literature/Flashman}} encounters the Duke once or twice, or at least references his opinions. Most notably in the first novel, where he receives a medal from UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria and a handshake from Wellington; it's the second one he is most proud of.

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* {{Literature/Flashman}} ''{{Literature/Flashman}}'' encounters the Duke once or twice, or at least references his opinions. Most notably in the end of the first novel, novel where he receives a medal from UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria and a handshake from Wellington; it's Wellington. Before parting ways, Wellington commends the second one young Flashman that today is the biggest day of his life, where he is most proud of.receives the greatest honour in his life. He notes that when he mentioned the incident to Robert E. Lee during his time in the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar, Lee believed that the Duke meant his handshake rather than the Queen's medal. Flashman demurs that both of them were worth the same to him.



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*Appears in {{HoratioHornblower}} as Hornblower is married to the Duke's fictional youngest sister, Lady Barbara.


He was Tory Prime Minister 1828-1830 and again for less than a month in 1838. He also named a third ministry: the short-lived first Cabinet of UsefulNotes/TheEarlOfDerby in 1852 was the first time the Protectionist wing of the Conservative Party had governed, and so had a lot of new names (e.g. UsefulNotes/BenjaminDisraeli); when these unfamiliar names were read out in the Lords, the aging and hard-of-hearing Duke interjected, "Who? Who?", and behold! the First Derby Ministry is forever known as the "Who? Who? Ministry". His political career is much less famous and far less celebrated mostly because it casts him in a less-than-positive light by modern standards, such as [[http://www.thejc.com/news/uk-news/137984/revealed-why-wellington-was-no-friend-jews his anti-semitism]] which led him to veto a bill that provided increased rights for Jews[[note]]"... this is a Christian country and a Christian legislature, and that the effect of this measure would be to remove that peculiar character...I see no ground whatever for passing the Bill; and shall, therefore, vote against it."[[/note]]. Indeed his general opposition to parliamentary reform earned him the nickname the Iron Duke, and while [[AppropriatedAppellation later supporters appropriated this sobriquet]], it was originally an insult. So unpopular was the Duke, that his house windows were smashed by supporters angry at his opposition of a Reform Bill. In response, [[IResembleThatRemark the Duke put in place Iron shutters to better protect his home]]. Despite this, the 1832 Reform Bill was passed by the Whigs, though the Duke was bitter about its passage. Ironically, the impetus for the Reform Act partly came from a legislation to improve the lot of Catholics in Ireland [[HoistByHisOwnPetard which the Duke had passed]]. Fearing increased rights for the Irish catholic community, a faction of the Tories allied with the Whigs to get the Reform Act passed.

to:

He was Tory Prime Minister 1828-1830 and again for less than a month in 1838. He also named a third ministry: the short-lived first Cabinet of UsefulNotes/TheEarlOfDerby in 1852 was the first time the Protectionist wing of the Conservative Party had governed, and so had a lot of new names (e.g. UsefulNotes/BenjaminDisraeli); when these unfamiliar names were read out in the Lords, the aging and hard-of-hearing Duke interjected, "Who? Who?", and behold! the First Derby Ministry is forever known as the "Who? Who? Ministry". His political career is much less famous and far less celebrated mostly because it casts him in a less-than-positive light by modern standards, such as [[http://www.thejc.com/news/uk-news/137984/revealed-why-wellington-was-no-friend-jews his anti-semitism]] which led him to veto a bill that provided increased rights for Jews[[note]]"... this is a Christian country and a Christian legislature, and that the effect of this measure would be to remove that peculiar character...I see no ground whatever for passing the Bill; and shall, therefore, vote against it."[[/note]]. Indeed his general opposition to parliamentary reform earned him the nickname the Iron Duke, and while [[AppropriatedAppellation later supporters appropriated this sobriquet]], it was originally an insult. So unpopular was the Duke, that his house windows were smashed by supporters angry at his opposition of a Reform Bill. In response, [[IResembleThatRemark the Duke put in place Iron shutters to better protect his home]]. Despite this, the 1832 Reform Bill was passed by the Whigs, though the Duke was bitter about its passage. Ironically, the impetus for the Reform Act partly came from a legislation to improve the lot of Catholics in Ireland [[HoistByHisOwnPetard which the Duke had passed]].passed]] in the teeth of serious opposition. Fearing increased rights for the Irish catholic community, a faction of the Tories allied with the Whigs to get the Reform Act passed.



* Obviously we see him in ''Series/{{Sharpe}}''.
* Appears as a secondary character in ''Literature/JonathanStrangeAndMrNorrell''. Gets his own short story, "The Duke Of Wellington Misplaces His Horse", in the followup short story collection ''The Ladies of Grace Adieu''.

to:

* Obviously we see him in ''Series/{{Sharpe}}''.
''Series/{{Sharpe}}''. Running a mission for him earns Sharpe his Sergeantcy, and saving his life at the Battle of Assaye (the one mentioned in the page quote of UsefulNotes/BritsWithBattleships) earns him his commission. His usually presented as a somewhat grudging ReasonableAuthorityFigure who uses MilitaryMaverick Sharpe as a kind of proto-cruise missile - he points him at something that needs destroying, then waits for the bang, though also being willing to cut his losses if need be. He is also mentioned by one of Sharpe's friends as the one man who actually properly scares Sharpe (and, therefore, is just about the only person who can wrangle Sharpe into doing what he [Wellington] wants him to).
* Appears as a secondary character in ''Literature/JonathanStrangeAndMrNorrell''.''Literature/JonathanStrangeAndMrNorrell'', as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure with NervesOfSteel who regards the entire city of Brussels being teleported to the Great Plains of America with little more than a raised eyebrow, and whose management style (once he is convinced of Strange's usefulness) mostly consists of telling Strange what magical thing he wants done, then leaving Strange to sort out the details. Gets his own short story, "The Duke Of Wellington Misplaces His Horse", in the followup short story collection ''The Ladies of Grace Adieu''.


His military career was rapid, reaching the rank of Colonel in 12 years thanks to the peculiar British system of purchasing promotions. Despite an extremely impressive military career in India, he did not come to real prominence until UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars,[[note]]Ironically, Napoleon too was not born in the nation that he is famous for being from; his birthplace had been transferred from theoretical Genoese sovereignty to French a mere two years before his birth (and he was originally called the much more Italian "Napoleone Buonaparte"), making the Napoleonic wars between the French led by a Corsican and the British led by several Irishmen, most notably Wellington, his brother Richard Lord Wellesley, and Lord Castlereagh. Also born the same year as Napoleon. Makes one wonder...[[/note]] and was promoted to the rank of Field Marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to the Congress of Vienna and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded one of the the allied armies which defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. He is also credited with the defeat of the French under Marshall Massena in the Third French Invasion of Portugal due to him ordering the construction of the [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_of_Torres_Vedras Lines of Torres Vedras]] (after one of the towns through which it passed), which is considered the most cost-effective fortification in military history - it was able to effectively accomplish its tactical (defend the Port of Lisbon[[note]]which was the communications gateway between the Anglo-Portuguese Army and the United Kingdom[[/note]]) and strategic (defend Portugal [[note]]for it was more easy to defend that country then advance into Spain, because he considered that Portugal gave him all necessary conditions[[/note]][[note]]also, Portugal was for him more worthy of defense than Spain, due to the fact it had [[BindingAncientTreaty the oldest alliance]] with the United Kingdom and had offered the UK its full support since the beginning, while Spain had in the beginning of the Peninsular War offered its army and all its resources to aid France[[/note]]) objectives at a very low cost. In fact, Portugal had offered him the patent of Marshall General of the Portuguese Army, which gave control of said army when in joint operations with the British Army. He used that title to reorganize the Portuguese, who were a demotivated and deorganized RagtagBunchOfMisfits into a capable, cohesive, motivated and organized Army.

to:

His military career was rapid, reaching the rank of Colonel in 12 years thanks to the peculiar British system of purchasing promotions. Despite an extremely impressive military career in India, he did not come to real prominence until UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars,[[note]]Ironically, Napoleon too was not born in the nation that he is famous for being from; his birthplace had been transferred from theoretical Genoese sovereignty to French a mere two years before his birth (and he was originally called the much more Italian "Napoleone Buonaparte"), making the Napoleonic wars between the French led by a Corsican and the British led by several Irishmen, most notably Wellington, his brother Richard Lord Wellesley, and Lord Castlereagh. Also born the same year as Napoleon. Makes one wonder...[[/note]] and was promoted to the rank of Field Marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to the Congress of Vienna and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded one of the the allied armies which defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. He is also credited with the defeat of the French under Marshall Massena in the Third French Invasion of Portugal due to him ordering the construction of the [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_of_Torres_Vedras Lines of Torres Vedras]] (after one of the towns through which it passed), which is considered the most cost-effective fortification in military history - it was able to effectively accomplish its tactical (defend the Port of Lisbon[[note]]which was the communications gateway between the Anglo-Portuguese Army and the United Kingdom[[/note]]) and strategic (defend Portugal [[note]]for it was more easy to defend that country then advance into Spain, because he considered that Portugal gave him all necessary conditions[[/note]][[note]]also, conditions[[/note]] [[note]]also, Portugal was for him more worthy of defense than Spain, due to the fact it had [[BindingAncientTreaty the oldest alliance]] with the United Kingdom and had offered the UK its full support since the beginning, Peninsular War first started, while Spain had in the beginning of the Peninsular War at first offered its army and all its resources to aid France[[/note]]) objectives at a very low cost. In fact, Portugal had offered him the patent of Marshall General of the Portuguese Army, which gave control of said army when in joint operations with the British Army. He used that title to reorganize the Portuguese, who were a demotivated and deorganized RagtagBunchOfMisfits into a capable, cohesive, motivated and organized Army.


His military career was rapid, reaching the rank of Colonel in 12 years thanks to the peculiar British system of purchasing promotions. Despite an extremely impressive military career in India, he did not come to real prominence until UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars,[[note]]Ironically, Napoleon too was not born in the nation that he is famous for being from; his birthplace had been transferred from theoretical Genoese sovereignty to French a mere two years before his birth (and he was originally called the much more Italian "Napoleone Buonaparte"), making the Napoleonic wars between the French led by a Corsican and the British led by several Irishmen, most notably Wellington, his brother Richard Lord Wellesley, and Lord Castlereagh. Also born the same year as Napoleon. Makes one wonder...[[/note]] and was promoted to the rank of Field Marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to the Congress of Vienna and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded one of the the allied armies which defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. He is also credited with the defeat of the French under Marshall Massena in the Third French Invasion of Portugal due to him ordering the construction of the [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_of_Torres_Vedras Lines of Torres Vedras]] (after one of the towns through which it passed), which is considered the most cost-effective fortification in military history - it was able to effectively accomplish its tactical (defend the Port of Lisbon, which was the communications gateway between the Anglo-Portuguese Army and the United Kingdom) and strategic (defend Portugal for it was more easy to defend that country then advance into Spain, because he considered that Portugal gave him all necessary conditions; also, Portugal was for him more worthy of defense than Spain, due to the fact it had [[BindingAncientTreaty the oldest alliance]] with the United Kingdom and had offered the UK its full support since the beginning, while Spain had in the beginning of the Peninsular War offered its army and all its resources to aid France) objectives at a very low cost. In fact, Portugal had offered him the patent of Marshall General of the Portuguese Army, which gave control of said army when in joint operations with the British Army. He used that title to reorganize the Portuguese, who were a demotivated and deorganized RagtagBunchOfMisfits into a capable, cohesive, motivated and organized Army.

to:

His military career was rapid, reaching the rank of Colonel in 12 years thanks to the peculiar British system of purchasing promotions. Despite an extremely impressive military career in India, he did not come to real prominence until UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars,[[note]]Ironically, Napoleon too was not born in the nation that he is famous for being from; his birthplace had been transferred from theoretical Genoese sovereignty to French a mere two years before his birth (and he was originally called the much more Italian "Napoleone Buonaparte"), making the Napoleonic wars between the French led by a Corsican and the British led by several Irishmen, most notably Wellington, his brother Richard Lord Wellesley, and Lord Castlereagh. Also born the same year as Napoleon. Makes one wonder...[[/note]] and was promoted to the rank of Field Marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to the Congress of Vienna and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded one of the the allied armies which defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. He is also credited with the defeat of the French under Marshall Massena in the Third French Invasion of Portugal due to him ordering the construction of the [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_of_Torres_Vedras Lines of Torres Vedras]] (after one of the towns through which it passed), which is considered the most cost-effective fortification in military history - it was able to effectively accomplish its tactical (defend the Port of Lisbon, which Lisbon[[note]]which was the communications gateway between the Anglo-Portuguese Army and the United Kingdom) Kingdom[[/note]]) and strategic (defend Portugal for [[note]]for it was more easy to defend that country then advance into Spain, because he considered that Portugal gave him all necessary conditions; also, conditions[[/note]][[note]]also, Portugal was for him more worthy of defense than Spain, due to the fact it had [[BindingAncientTreaty the oldest alliance]] with the United Kingdom and had offered the UK its full support since the beginning, while Spain had in the beginning of the Peninsular War offered its army and all its resources to aid France) France[[/note]]) objectives at a very low cost. In fact, Portugal had offered him the patent of Marshall General of the Portuguese Army, which gave control of said army when in joint operations with the British Army. He used that title to reorganize the Portuguese, who were a demotivated and deorganized RagtagBunchOfMisfits into a capable, cohesive, motivated and organized Army.


His military career was rapid, reaching the rank of Colonel in 12 years thanks to the peculiar British system of purchasing promotions. Despite an extremely impressive military career in India, he did not come to real prominence until UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars,[[note]]Ironically, Napoleon too was not born in the nation that he is famous for being from; his birthplace had been transferred from theoretical Genoese sovereignty to French a mere two years before his birth (and he was originally called the much more Italian "Napoleone Buonaparte"), making the Napoleonic wars between the French led by a Corsican and the British led by several Irishmen, most notably Wellington, his brother Richard Lord Wellesley, and Lord Castlereagh. Also born the same year as Napoleon. Makes one wonder...[[/note]] and was promoted to the rank of Field Marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to the Congress of Vienna and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded one of the the allied armies which defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. He is also credited with the defeat of the French under Marshall Massena in the Third French Invasion of Portugal due to him ordering the construction of the [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_of_Torres_Vedras Lines of Torres Vedras]] (after one of the towns through which it passed), which is considered the most cost-effective fortification in military history - it was able to effectively accomplish its tactical (defend the Port of Lisbon, which was the communications gateway between the Anglo-Portuguese Army and the United Kingdom) and strategic (defend Portugal for it was more easy to defend that country then advance into Spain, because he considered that Portugal gave him all necessary conditions; also, Portugal was for him more worthy of defense than Spain, due to the fact it had [[BindingAncientTreaty the oldest alliance]] with the United Kingdom and had offered the UK its full support since the beginning, while Spain had in the beginning of the Peninsular War offered its army and all its resources to aid France) objectives. In fact, Portugal had offered him the patent of Marshall General of the Portuguese Army, which gave control of said army when in joint operations with the British Army.

to:

His military career was rapid, reaching the rank of Colonel in 12 years thanks to the peculiar British system of purchasing promotions. Despite an extremely impressive military career in India, he did not come to real prominence until UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars,[[note]]Ironically, Napoleon too was not born in the nation that he is famous for being from; his birthplace had been transferred from theoretical Genoese sovereignty to French a mere two years before his birth (and he was originally called the much more Italian "Napoleone Buonaparte"), making the Napoleonic wars between the French led by a Corsican and the British led by several Irishmen, most notably Wellington, his brother Richard Lord Wellesley, and Lord Castlereagh. Also born the same year as Napoleon. Makes one wonder...[[/note]] and was promoted to the rank of Field Marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to the Congress of Vienna and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded one of the the allied armies which defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. He is also credited with the defeat of the French under Marshall Massena in the Third French Invasion of Portugal due to him ordering the construction of the [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_of_Torres_Vedras Lines of Torres Vedras]] (after one of the towns through which it passed), which is considered the most cost-effective fortification in military history - it was able to effectively accomplish its tactical (defend the Port of Lisbon, which was the communications gateway between the Anglo-Portuguese Army and the United Kingdom) and strategic (defend Portugal for it was more easy to defend that country then advance into Spain, because he considered that Portugal gave him all necessary conditions; also, Portugal was for him more worthy of defense than Spain, due to the fact it had [[BindingAncientTreaty the oldest alliance]] with the United Kingdom and had offered the UK its full support since the beginning, while Spain had in the beginning of the Peninsular War offered its army and all its resources to aid France) objectives. objectives at a very low cost. In fact, Portugal had offered him the patent of Marshall General of the Portuguese Army, which gave control of said army when in joint operations with the British Army. He used that title to reorganize the Portuguese, who were a demotivated and deorganized RagtagBunchOfMisfits into a capable, cohesive, motivated and organized Army.


His military career was rapid, reaching the rank of Colonel in 12 years thanks to the peculiar British system of purchasing promotions. Despite an extremely impressive military career in India, he did not come to real prominence until UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars,[[note]]Ironically, Napoleon too was not born in the nation that he is famous for being from; his birthplace had been transferred from theoretical Genoese sovereignty to French a mere two years before his birth (and he was originally called the much more Italian "Napoleone Buonaparte"), making the Napoleonic wars between the French led by a Corsican and the British led by several Irishmen, most notably Wellington, his brother Richard Lord Wellesley, and Lord Castlereagh. Also born the same year as Napoleon. Makes one wonder...[[/note]] and was promoted to the rank of Field Marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to the Congress of Vienna and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded one of the the allied armies which defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo.

to:

His military career was rapid, reaching the rank of Colonel in 12 years thanks to the peculiar British system of purchasing promotions. Despite an extremely impressive military career in India, he did not come to real prominence until UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars,[[note]]Ironically, Napoleon too was not born in the nation that he is famous for being from; his birthplace had been transferred from theoretical Genoese sovereignty to French a mere two years before his birth (and he was originally called the much more Italian "Napoleone Buonaparte"), making the Napoleonic wars between the French led by a Corsican and the British led by several Irishmen, most notably Wellington, his brother Richard Lord Wellesley, and Lord Castlereagh. Also born the same year as Napoleon. Makes one wonder...[[/note]] and was promoted to the rank of Field Marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to the Congress of Vienna and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded one of the the allied armies which defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo.
Waterloo. He is also credited with the defeat of the French under Marshall Massena in the Third French Invasion of Portugal due to him ordering the construction of the [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_of_Torres_Vedras Lines of Torres Vedras]] (after one of the towns through which it passed), which is considered the most cost-effective fortification in military history - it was able to effectively accomplish its tactical (defend the Port of Lisbon, which was the communications gateway between the Anglo-Portuguese Army and the United Kingdom) and strategic (defend Portugal for it was more easy to defend that country then advance into Spain, because he considered that Portugal gave him all necessary conditions; also, Portugal was for him more worthy of defense than Spain, due to the fact it had [[BindingAncientTreaty the oldest alliance]] with the United Kingdom and had offered the UK its full support since the beginning, while Spain had in the beginning of the Peninsular War offered its army and all its resources to aid France) objectives. In fact, Portugal had offered him the patent of Marshall General of the Portuguese Army, which gave control of said army when in joint operations with the British Army.


->''All the business of war, and indeed all the business of life, is to endeavour to find out what you don't know by what you do; that's what I called "guessing what was at the other side of the hill."''

'''Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley''', [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever 1st Duke of Wellington, KG KP GCB GCH PC FRS]] (1 May 1769 14 September 1852), was a British soldier and statesman, and one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain. His defeat of UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 put him in the top rank of Britain's military heroes. He is often referred to as one of the greatest English generals of all time, except that he was Irish. Indeed his real name is Arthur Wesley, he added the "lle" later. His supposed response (not recorded until after his death) to people pointing out his Irish birth was something along the lines of 'If a man is born in a stable, that doesn't make him a horse', a sentiment which didn't stop him marrying an Irish woman or the Irish building a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wellington_Monument,_Dublin 200 ft tall monument in his honor]]. To be fair, his comments stemmed from a dislike of the Protestant and often power-abusing Irish aristocracy rather than the "normal" Irish (Catholic or Protestant), whom he regarded as reasonably good soldiering material and thought no worse of than the "normal" English, Scottish or Welsh (which is to say, he didn't think of them very often).

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->''All ->''"All the business of war, and indeed all the business of life, is to endeavour to find out what you don't know by what you do; that's what I called "guessing 'guessing what was at the other side of the hill."''

'''Field
'"''

Field
Marshal Arthur Wellesley''', Wellesley, [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever 1st Duke of Wellington, KG KP GCB GCH PC FRS]] (1 May 1769 14 September 1852), was a British soldier and statesman, and one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain. His defeat of UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 put him in the top rank of Britain's military heroes. He is often referred to as one of the greatest English generals of all time, except that he was Irish. Indeed his real name is Arthur Wesley, he added the "lle" later. His supposed response (not recorded until after his death) to people pointing out his Irish birth was something along the lines of 'If a man is born in a stable, that doesn't make him a horse', a sentiment which didn't stop him marrying an Irish woman or the Irish building a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wellington_Monument,_Dublin 200 ft tall monument in his honor]]. To be fair, his comments stemmed from a dislike of the Protestant and often power-abusing Irish aristocracy rather than the "normal" Irish (Catholic or Protestant), whom he regarded as reasonably good soldiering material and thought no worse of than the "normal" English, Scottish or Welsh (which is to say, he didn't think of them very often).



He was Tory Prime Minister 1828-1830 and again for less than a month in 1838. He also named a third ministry: the short-lived first Cabinet of UsefulNotes/TheEarlOfDerby in 1852 was the first time the Protectionist wing of the Conservative Party had governed, and so had a lot of new names (e.g. Creator/BenjaminDisraeli); when these unfamiliar names were read out in the Lords, the aging and hard-of-hearing Duke interjected, "Who? Who?", and behold! the First Derby Ministry is forever known as the "Who? Who? Ministry". His political career is much less famous and far less celebrated mostly because it casts him in a less-than-positive light by modern standards, such as [[http://www.thejc.com/news/uk-news/137984/revealed-why-wellington-was-no-friend-jews his anti-semitism]] which led him to veto a bill that provided increased rights for Jews[[note]]"... this is a Christian country and a Christian legislature, and that the effect of this measure would be to remove that peculiar character...I see no ground whatever for passing the Bill; and shall, therefore, vote against it."[[/note]]. Indeed his general opposition to parliamentary reform earned him the nickname the Iron Duke, and while [[AppropriatedAppellation later supporters appropriated this sobriquet]], it was originally an insult. So unpopular was the Duke, that his house windows were smashed by supporters angry at his opposition of a Reform Bill. In response, [[IResembleThatRemark the Duke put in place Iron shutters to better protect his home]]. Despite this, the 1832 Reform Bill was passed by the Whigs, though the Duke was bitter about its passage. Ironically, the impetus for the Reform Act partly came from a legislation to improve the lot of Catholics in Ireland [[HoistByHisOwnPetard which the Duke had passed]]. Fearing increased rights for the Irish catholic community, a faction of the Tories allied with the Whigs to get the Reform Act passed.

to:

He was Tory Prime Minister 1828-1830 and again for less than a month in 1838. He also named a third ministry: the short-lived first Cabinet of UsefulNotes/TheEarlOfDerby in 1852 was the first time the Protectionist wing of the Conservative Party had governed, and so had a lot of new names (e.g. Creator/BenjaminDisraeli); UsefulNotes/BenjaminDisraeli); when these unfamiliar names were read out in the Lords, the aging and hard-of-hearing Duke interjected, "Who? Who?", and behold! the First Derby Ministry is forever known as the "Who? Who? Ministry". His political career is much less famous and far less celebrated mostly because it casts him in a less-than-positive light by modern standards, such as [[http://www.thejc.com/news/uk-news/137984/revealed-why-wellington-was-no-friend-jews his anti-semitism]] which led him to veto a bill that provided increased rights for Jews[[note]]"... this is a Christian country and a Christian legislature, and that the effect of this measure would be to remove that peculiar character...I see no ground whatever for passing the Bill; and shall, therefore, vote against it."[[/note]]. Indeed his general opposition to parliamentary reform earned him the nickname the Iron Duke, and while [[AppropriatedAppellation later supporters appropriated this sobriquet]], it was originally an insult. So unpopular was the Duke, that his house windows were smashed by supporters angry at his opposition of a Reform Bill. In response, [[IResembleThatRemark the Duke put in place Iron shutters to better protect his home]]. Despite this, the 1832 Reform Bill was passed by the Whigs, though the Duke was bitter about its passage. Ironically, the impetus for the Reform Act partly came from a legislation to improve the lot of Catholics in Ireland [[HoistByHisOwnPetard which the Duke had passed]]. Fearing increased rights for the Irish catholic community, a faction of the Tories allied with the Whigs to get the Reform Act passed.


* Has a fairly prominent role in the fifth book of the {{Temeraire}} series, ''Victory of Eagles''.

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* Has a fairly prominent role in the fifth book of the {{Temeraire}} Literature/{{Temeraire}} series, ''Victory of Eagles''.

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