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* [[CaughtWithYourPantsDown Jim McGreevey]] (Jersey City, then Metuchen). Notable for how he became the first LGBT governor in the US[[note]]The first person to be ''elected'' governor while already out of the closet was Oregon's Kate Brown, who was bisexual (albeit married to a man), became governor in 2015 after her predecessor resigned due to a corruption scandal (ironically, of a similar kind to that which brought down [=McGreevey=]: namely, his fiance was using her relationship to the governor to get contracts for her consulting firm), and won reelection in her own right in a special election the following year. The first openly gay man to be elected was Colorado's Jared Polis in 2018.[[/note]] under the worst possible circumstances: namely, he come out as gay in the same speech in which he admitted that the clearly-unqualified Israeli man he had appointed as his homeland-security adviser was also his lover, and also declared that he would be resigning the governorship, all while [[TheBeard his wife]] stood beside him in shock. (See what we meant earlier about corruption?)

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* [[CaughtWithYourPantsDown Jim McGreevey]] (Jersey City, then Metuchen). Notable for how he became the first known LGBT governor in the US[[note]]The first person to be ''elected'' governor while already out of the closet was Oregon's Kate Brown, who was bisexual (albeit married to a man), became governor in 2015 after her predecessor resigned due to a corruption scandal (ironically, of a similar kind to that which brought down [=McGreevey=]: namely, his fiance was using her relationship to the governor to get contracts for her consulting firm), and won reelection in her own right in a special election the following year. The first openly gay man to be elected was Colorado's Jared Polis in 2018.[[/note]] under the worst possible circumstances: namely, he come out as gay in the same speech in which he admitted that the clearly-unqualified Israeli man he had appointed as his homeland-security adviser was also his lover, and also declared that he would be resigning the governorship, all while [[TheBeard his wife]] stood beside him in shock. (See what we meant earlier about corruption?)


** '''Toms River:''' Another suburban community with safe streets. Holds the world's second-largest [[AllHallowsEve Halloween]] parade. The Toms River East Little League UsefulNotes/{{baseball}} team won the Little League World Series in 1998, an accomplishment that was commemorated in the town naming its main thoroughfare the Little League World Champions Boulevard. And absolutely none of this matters to most New Jerseyans, who chiefly know the town for one thing: being the last stop between the Parkway and...

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** '''Toms River:''' Another suburban community with safe streets. Holds the world's second-largest [[AllHallowsEve [[UsefulNotes/AllHallowsEve Halloween]] parade. The Toms River East Little League UsefulNotes/{{baseball}} team won the Little League World Series in 1998, an accomplishment that was commemorated in the town naming its main thoroughfare the Little League World Champions Boulevard. And absolutely none of this matters to most New Jerseyans, who chiefly know the town for one thing: being the last stop between the Parkway and...


* Music/TheFugees (South Orange). All three of its members were from Essex County:
** Music/LaurynHill (South Orange)
** Wyclef Jean (born in Haiti, but moved to Newark via Brooklyn as a child; later lived in South Orange and North Caldwell)
** Pras (born in Brooklyn but raised in Irvington)



* Music/LaurynHill (South Orange)


This suburban trend has long colored New Jersey's politics. In TheSeventies and TheEighties, New Jersey was a solidly Republican state, with the large and growing numbers of suburbanites voting against the largely Democratic cities that they had moved out of. UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan won New Jersey by a greater margin than he had won nationally during both of his [[LandslideElection electoral landslides]], taking 60% of the vote in 1984. In TheNineties, though, the state began to swing to the left, the pivotal year being 1992 when New Jersey served as a key swing state that ultimately went to the Democrats. Much of this has been attributed to the rise of the fiscally moderate, socially liberal "New Democrats" ''a la'' UsefulNotes/BillClinton within the Democratic Party, and to the growing dominance of the Christian Right within the Republican Party; New Jersey's conservatives had long been of the more center-right, business-oriented, "Rockefeller Republican" variety rather than the "movement conservatism" of the post-Reagan Republican Party.[[note]]An early sign of this was in 1980, when independent candidate John B. Anderson, running as [[TakeAThirdOption a moderate alternative]] to both the unpopular UsefulNotes/JimmyCarter and to the arch-conservative Reagan, won 7.9% of the vote in New Jersey, a fair bit more than the 6.6% he had won nationally. Today, this can be seen in the governorship of Chris Christie, who was in his time a leading moderate figure within the Republican Party, whose career was defined by compromise with the state's Democratic legislature (most observers regard instances of conflict between Christie and the Legislature to be essentially ego clashes with Democratic leadership, particularly Senate President Steve Sweeney). A good analogy to UsefulNotes/{{British politic|alSystem}}s would be that New Jersey would probably vote for the Lib Dems or New Labour if it were British.[[/note]] Today, New Jersey is a Democratic stronghold, especially in Presidential elections and in the "belt" running between UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity and UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}}, though the northwest and the Shore (outside Atlantic City and Asbury Park) vote reliably Republican, and the state overall is willing to elect center-right moderates as their governor (two recent examples being Christine Todd Whitman and Chris Christie--although Christie's name has become mud even in Republican circles on account of his hard fiscal line on police pensions, the abuse-of-office scandals associated with his 2013 reelection campaign, and his willingness to carry water for UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump. Speaking of the Donald, New Jersey Republicans tend to look warily on him, tending to be moderate suburbanites who mostly care about tax rates and donít really support his reactionary social cultural views. South Jersey Republicans generally like him better than their northern counterparts, but they also tend to be cautious towards him because of his numerous misadventures in the Atlantic City casino industry. Trumpís presidency proved to be a disaster for the New Jersey GOP, as all but one of their twelve congressional seats voted for Democrats in the 2018 midterms, and their Democratic senator Bob Menendez cruised towards re-election despite his own corruption scandals.

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This suburban trend has long colored New Jersey's politics. In TheSeventies and TheEighties, New Jersey was a solidly Republican state, with the large and growing numbers of suburbanites voting against the largely Democratic cities that they had moved out of. UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan won New Jersey by a greater margin than he had won nationally during both of his [[LandslideElection electoral landslides]], taking 60% of the vote in 1984. In TheNineties, though, the state began to swing to the left, the pivotal year being 1992 when New Jersey served as a key swing state that ultimately went to the Democrats. Much of this has been attributed to the rise of the fiscally moderate, socially liberal "New Democrats" ''a la'' UsefulNotes/BillClinton within the Democratic Party, and to the growing dominance of the Christian Right within the Republican Party; New Jersey's conservatives had long been of the more center-right, business-oriented, "Rockefeller Republican" variety rather than the "movement conservatism" of the post-Reagan Republican Party.[[note]]An early sign of this was in 1980, when independent candidate John B. Anderson, running as [[TakeAThirdOption a moderate alternative]] to both the unpopular UsefulNotes/JimmyCarter and to the arch-conservative Reagan, won 7.9% of the vote in New Jersey, a fair bit more than the 6.6% he had won nationally. Today, this can be seen in the governorship of Chris Christie, who was in his time a leading moderate figure within the Republican Party, whose career was defined by compromise with the state's Democratic legislature (most observers regard instances of conflict between Christie and the Legislature to be essentially ego clashes with Democratic leadership, particularly Senate President Steve Sweeney).Sweeney; the only place observers saw the conflict as policy-based was over police pensions, and even Republican lawmakers opposed him on that). A good analogy to UsefulNotes/{{British politic|alSystem}}s would be that New Jersey would probably vote for the Lib Dems or New Labour if it were British.[[/note]] Today, New Jersey is a Democratic stronghold, especially in Presidential elections and in the "belt" running between UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity and UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}}, though the northwest and the Shore (outside Atlantic City and Asbury Park) vote reliably Republican, and the state overall is willing to elect center-right moderates as their governor (two recent examples being Christine Todd Whitman and Chris Christie--although Christie's name has become mud even in Republican circles on account of his hard fiscal line on police pensions, the abuse-of-office scandals associated with his 2013 reelection campaign, and his willingness to carry water for UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump. Speaking of the Donald, New Jersey Republicans tend to look warily on him, tending to be moderate suburbanites who mostly care about tax rates and donít really support his reactionary social cultural views. South Jersey Republicans generally like him better than their northern counterparts, but they also tend to be cautious towards him because of his numerous misadventures in the Atlantic City casino industry. Trumpís presidency proved to be a disaster for the New Jersey GOP, as all but one of their twelve congressional seats voted for Democrats in the 2018 midterms, and their Democratic senator Bob Menendez cruised towards re-election despite his own corruption scandals.


This suburban trend has long colored New Jersey's politics. In TheSeventies and TheEighties, New Jersey was a solidly Republican state, with the large and growing numbers of suburbanites voting against the largely Democratic cities that they had moved out of. UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan won New Jersey by a greater margin than he had won nationally during both of his [[LandslideElection electoral landslides]], taking 60% of the vote in 1984. In TheNineties, though, the state began to swing to the left, the pivotal year being 1992 when New Jersey served as a key swing state that ultimately went to the Democrats. Much of this has been attributed to the rise of the fiscally moderate, socially liberal "New Democrats" ''a la'' UsefulNotes/BillClinton within the Democratic Party, and to the growing dominance of the Christian Right within the Republican Party; New Jersey's conservatives had long been of the more center-right, business-oriented, "Rockefeller Republican" variety rather than the "movement conservatism" of the post-Reagan Republican Party.[[note]]An early sign of this was in 1980, when independent candidate John B. Anderson, running as [[TakeAThirdOption a moderate alternative]] to both the unpopular UsefulNotes/JimmyCarter and to the arch-conservative Reagan, won 7.9% of the vote in New Jersey, a fair bit more than the 6.6% he had won nationally. Today, this can be seen in the state's current governor, Chris Christie, a leading moderate figure within the Republican Party whose career has been defined by compromise with the state's Democratic legislature. A good analogy to UsefulNotes/{{British politic|alSystem}}s would be that New Jersey would probably vote for the Lib Dems or New Labour if it were British.[[/note]] Today, New Jersey is a Democratic stronghold, especially in Presidential elections and in the "belt" running between UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity and UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}}, though the northwest and the Shore (outside Atlantic City and Asbury Park) vote reliably Republican, and the state overall is willing to elect center-right moderates as their governor (two recent examples being Christine Todd Whitman and Chris Christie--although Christie's name has become mud even in Republican circles on account of his hard fiscal line on police pensions, the abuse-of-office scandals associated with his 2013 reelection campaign, and his willingness to carry water for UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump. Speaking of the Donald, New Jersey Republicans tend to look warily on him, tending to be moderate suburbanites who mostly care about tax rates and donít really support his reactionary social cultural views. South Jersey Republicans generally like him better than their northern counterparts, but they also tend to be cautious towards him because of his numerous misadventures in the Atlantic City casino industry. Trumpís presidency proved to be a disaster for the New Jersey GOP, as all but one of their twelve congressional seats voted for Democrats in the 2018 midterms, and their Democratic senator Bob Menendez cruised towards re-election despite his own corruption scandals.

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This suburban trend has long colored New Jersey's politics. In TheSeventies and TheEighties, New Jersey was a solidly Republican state, with the large and growing numbers of suburbanites voting against the largely Democratic cities that they had moved out of. UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan won New Jersey by a greater margin than he had won nationally during both of his [[LandslideElection electoral landslides]], taking 60% of the vote in 1984. In TheNineties, though, the state began to swing to the left, the pivotal year being 1992 when New Jersey served as a key swing state that ultimately went to the Democrats. Much of this has been attributed to the rise of the fiscally moderate, socially liberal "New Democrats" ''a la'' UsefulNotes/BillClinton within the Democratic Party, and to the growing dominance of the Christian Right within the Republican Party; New Jersey's conservatives had long been of the more center-right, business-oriented, "Rockefeller Republican" variety rather than the "movement conservatism" of the post-Reagan Republican Party.[[note]]An early sign of this was in 1980, when independent candidate John B. Anderson, running as [[TakeAThirdOption a moderate alternative]] to both the unpopular UsefulNotes/JimmyCarter and to the arch-conservative Reagan, won 7.9% of the vote in New Jersey, a fair bit more than the 6.6% he had won nationally. Today, this can be seen in the state's current governor, governorship of Chris Christie, who was in his time a leading moderate figure within the Republican Party Party, whose career has been was defined by compromise with the state's Democratic legislature.legislature (most observers regard instances of conflict between Christie and the Legislature to be essentially ego clashes with Democratic leadership, particularly Senate President Steve Sweeney). A good analogy to UsefulNotes/{{British politic|alSystem}}s would be that New Jersey would probably vote for the Lib Dems or New Labour if it were British.[[/note]] Today, New Jersey is a Democratic stronghold, especially in Presidential elections and in the "belt" running between UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity and UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}}, though the northwest and the Shore (outside Atlantic City and Asbury Park) vote reliably Republican, and the state overall is willing to elect center-right moderates as their governor (two recent examples being Christine Todd Whitman and Chris Christie--although Christie's name has become mud even in Republican circles on account of his hard fiscal line on police pensions, the abuse-of-office scandals associated with his 2013 reelection campaign, and his willingness to carry water for UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump. Speaking of the Donald, New Jersey Republicans tend to look warily on him, tending to be moderate suburbanites who mostly care about tax rates and donít really support his reactionary social cultural views. South Jersey Republicans generally like him better than their northern counterparts, but they also tend to be cautious towards him because of his numerous misadventures in the Atlantic City casino industry. Trumpís presidency proved to be a disaster for the New Jersey GOP, as all but one of their twelve congressional seats voted for Democrats in the 2018 midterms, and their Democratic senator Bob Menendez cruised towards re-election despite his own corruption scandals.

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* Wrestling/KaiKatana


* Creator/EthanHawke (born in [[EverythingIsBigInTexas Austin]], but spent his teenage years in West Windor Township)

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* Creator/EthanHawke (born in [[EverythingIsBigInTexas Austin]], but spent his teenage years in West Windor Windsor Township)


#Because of the love of "local rule" and "towns," there are a ''plethora'' of local governments across the state (585 municipalities in 21 counties, to be exact, and that's not counting the scads of school districts, fire districts, sewer districts, and other such institutions), each one handing out contracts. This creates a lot of opportunity for corruption, since small local governments can't afford oversight and don't have the press going after them in the same way that a big-city pol might.

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#Because of the love of "local rule" and "towns," there are a ''plethora'' of local governments across the state (585 municipalities in 21 counties, to be exact, and that's not counting the scads of school districts, fire districts, sewer districts, and other such institutions), each one handing out contracts. For comparison, this puts New Jersey at #19 among all US states, ahead of Arkansas and behind North Carolina, despite being #46 in land area. This creates a lot of opportunity for corruption, since small local governments can't afford oversight and don't have the press going after them in the same way that a big-city pol might.


* Creator/LizGillies (Haworth)

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* Creator/LizGillies Creator/ElizabethGillies (Haworth)


* '''The Jersey Shore:''' New Jersey's coastline, and a major summer destination for New Yorkers, Pennsylvanians, and New Jerseyans alike. Generally considered to consist the portions of Monmouth, Ocean, Atlantic, and Cape May Counties that [[CaptainObvious face the Atlantic Ocean]].[[note]]The portions of Monmouth County that face Raritan Bay and the portions of Cape May County that face Delaware Bay are generally not included in the "Shore." Also, Burlington County technically has a tiny portion facing the Atlantic in Bass River Township near the tripoint with Atlantic and Ocean Counties, but that area is a swamp with nothing in it.[[/note]] It used to have [[NeverLiveItDown a reputation for being dirty]] due to the infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syringe_Tide "syringe tide"]] in the late '80s, when used syringes and other medical waste started washing up on the shore from the Fresh Kills landfill in Staten Island (in short, [[MisBlamed it wasn't even New Jersey's fault!]]). Now, thanks to Creator/{{MTV}}, it's has a reputation for being covered in [[TakeThat another kind of trash, once again imported from out of state]]. The Shore (outside of the Cape May peninsula, which was largely untouched) was among the hardest-hit areas on the East Coast in the wake of Hurricane Sandy in 2012, with many towns seeing homes washed away and their boardwalks destroyed in whole or in part. Locals affectionately call tourists either "Bennies", an acronym for Bayonne, Elizabeth, Newark, and New York, or "Shoobies" (originally meaning a person, usually from Pennsylvania, who came to the beach with lunch packed in a shoe box), depending on where you visit. \\

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* '''The Jersey Shore:''' New Jersey's coastline, and a major summer destination for New Yorkers, Pennsylvanians, and New Jerseyans alike. Generally considered to consist the portions of Monmouth, Ocean, Atlantic, and Cape May Counties that [[CaptainObvious face the Atlantic Ocean]].Ocean.[[note]]The portions of Monmouth County that face Raritan Bay and the portions of Cape May County that face Delaware Bay are generally not included in the "Shore." Also, Burlington County technically has a tiny portion facing the Atlantic in Bass River Township near the tripoint with Atlantic and Ocean Counties, but that area is a swamp with nothing in it.[[/note]] It used to have [[NeverLiveItDown a reputation for being dirty]] due to the infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syringe_Tide "syringe tide"]] in the late '80s, when used syringes and other medical waste started washing up on the shore from the Fresh Kills landfill in Staten Island (in short, [[MisBlamed it wasn't even New Jersey's fault!]]). Now, thanks to Creator/{{MTV}}, it's has a reputation for being covered in [[TakeThat another kind of trash, once again imported from out of state]]. The Shore (outside of the Cape May peninsula, which was largely untouched) was among the hardest-hit areas on the East Coast in the wake of Hurricane Sandy in 2012, with many towns seeing homes washed away and their boardwalks destroyed in whole or in part. Locals affectionately call tourists either "Bennies", an acronym for Bayonne, Elizabeth, Newark, and New York, or "Shoobies" (originally meaning a person, usually from Pennsylvania, who came to the beach with lunch packed in a shoe box), depending on where you visit. \\


* Creator/MichaelCudlitz (born in [[UsefulNotes/NewYork Long Island]], but grew up in Lakewood Township)

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* Creator/MichaelCudlitz (born in [[UsefulNotes/NewYork [[UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity Long Island]], but grew up in Lakewood Township)



* Creator/DylanOBrien (born in UsefulNotes/NewYork, but grew up in Springfield Township)

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* Creator/DylanOBrien (born in UsefulNotes/NewYork, UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, but grew up in Springfield Township)



* Creator/SusanSarandon (born in [[UsefulNotes/NewYork Queens]], but grew up in Edison)

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* Creator/SusanSarandon (born in [[UsefulNotes/NewYork [[UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity Queens]], but grew up in Edison)

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* Creator/MichaelJones (Woodbridge)


* [[Characters/WWEDivas Dawn Marie]] (Born in Rahway, raised in Woodbridge)

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* [[Characters/WWEDivas Dawn Marie]] Wrestling/DawnMarie (Born in Rahway, raised in Woodbridge)


* Creator/EthanHawke (born in [[UsefulNotes/{{Texas}} Austin]], but spent his teenage years in West Windor Township)

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* Creator/EthanHawke (born in [[UsefulNotes/{{Texas}} [[EverythingIsBigInTexas Austin]], but spent his teenage years in West Windor Township)

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