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Now ''youmuin'' is considered demeaning, so there is a shift towards using ''koumuin'' ("school task member") or ''kanrisagyouin'' ("maintenance member") instead. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Pinker Linguist Stephen Pinker]] calls this shift the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphemism#Evolution euphemism treadmill]]. This tends to give rise to {{Unusual Euphemism}}s

to:

Now ''youmuin'' is considered demeaning, so there is a shift towards using ''koumuin'' ("school task member") or ''kanrisagyouin'' ("maintenance member") instead. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Pinker org/wiki/Steven_Pinker Linguist Stephen Steven Pinker]] calls this shift the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphemism#Evolution euphemism treadmill]]. This tends to give rise to {{Unusual Euphemism}}s
Euphemism}}s.


Other examples of words which have become unacceptable include the replacement of the word ''hyakushou'' for "farmer" with ''nouka'', or the replacement of the word ''Shina'' for China written in kanji with the version written in katakana or with the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese name for China, ''Chuugoku''. Japan's lowest class during Japan's feudal era were called ''eta'' ("heavily polluted"). Their descendants have been renamed ''burakumin'' ("tribal people") (which has done nothing to change systematic prejudice against them). WWII saw the use of ''ianfu'' (comfort women) and ''jūgun-ianfu'' (military comfort women) for women working in military brothels, especially those women who were forced into prostitution as a form of sexual slavery by the Japanese military during the war.

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Other examples of words which have become unacceptable include the replacement of the word ''hyakushou'' for "farmer" with ''nouka'', or the replacement of the word ''Shina'' for China written in kanji with the version written in katakana or with the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese name for China, ''Chuugoku''. Japan's lowest class during Japan's feudal era were called ''eta'' ("heavily polluted"). Their descendants have been renamed ''burakumin'' ("tribal ("village people") (which has done nothing to change systematic prejudice against them). WWII saw the use of ''ianfu'' (comfort women) and ''jūgun-ianfu'' (military comfort women) for women working in military brothels, especially those women who were forced into prostitution as a form of sexual slavery by the Japanese military during the war.



* In the original manga of ''Manga/SgtFrog'', the aliens called Earth "Pokopen," which was a derogatory word that the Japanese used for China during the Sino-Japanese Wars. (Yes, it's a deliberate TakeThat.) However, Japanese broadcast authorities won't let people use the word, so we get "Pekopon" instead. Some dubs change it back to "Pokopen".

to:

* In the original manga of ''Manga/SgtFrog'', the aliens called Earth "Pokopen," which was a derogatory word that the Japanese used for China during the Sino-Japanese Wars. (Yes, it's a deliberate TakeThat.) However, Japanese broadcast authorities won't let people use the word, so we get "Pekopon" instead. Some dubs change it back to "Pokopen".
"Pokopen". Chinese translation of the series changed it to just "blue planet."


A similar, albeit not as extreme version of this, happens in the Japanese video game industry when describing foreign versions of a game: When a Japanese video game is released in western countries and described in Japanese media, the western version is ''never'' called as such (In Japanese 西洋版 "seiyou-ban"), but as "the overseas/foreign version" instead (海外版, "kaigai-ban"). In this case, this is justified, as many Japanese companies release their games in other Asian countries besides the western ones, even if the ones geared for America and Europe are different from the Japanese and Asian ones.[[note]]Keep in mind in Japan and East Asia, their definition of "the western world" is very different, as what they consider the "West" also includes at times Eastern Europe, Israel and some times, even Middle Eastern countries, on the grounds they share similar cultural traits, compared with the ones based in the Sinosphere (China, Japan, both Koreas, Vietnam, Thailand, etc.).[[/note]]

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A similar, albeit not as extreme version of this, happens in the Japanese video game industry when describing foreign versions of a game: When a Japanese video game is released in western countries and described in Japanese media, the western version is ''never'' called as such (In Japanese 西洋版 "seiyou-ban"), but as "the overseas/foreign version" instead (海外版, "kaigai-ban"). In this case, this is justified, as many Japanese companies release their games in other Asian countries besides the western ones, even if the ones geared for America and Europe are different from the Japanese and Asian ones.[[note]]Keep in mind in Japan and East Asia, their definition of "the western world" is very different, as what they consider the "West" also includes at times Eastern Europe, Israel and some times, even Middle Eastern countries, on the grounds they share similar cultural traits, compared with the ones based in the Sinosphere (China, Japan, both Koreas, Vietnam, Thailand, etc.).[[/note]]
[[/note]] For similar reasons, the western users of those games are never called "westerners" (西洋人 "seiyoujin", much less the already mentioned "gaijin" or even the politically correct "gaikokujin") but "overseas/foreign users" for the same reasons.


A similar, albeit not as extreme version of this, happens in the Japanese videogame industry when describing foreign versions of a game: When a Japanese videogame is released in western countries and described in Japanese media, the western version is ''never'' called as such (In Japanese 西洋版 "seiyou-ban"), but as "the overseas/foreign version" instead (海外版, "kaigai-ban"). In this case, this is justified, as many Japanese companies release their games in other Asian countries besides the western ones, even if the ones geared for America and Europe are different from the Japanese and Asian ones.[[note]]Keep in mind in Japan and East Asia, their definition of "the western world" is very different, as what they consider the "West" also includes at times Eastern Europe, Israel and some times, even Middle Eastern countries, on the grounds they share similar cultural traits, compared with the ones based in the Sinosphere (China, Japan, both Koreas, Vietnam, Thailand, etc.).[[/note]]

to:

A similar, albeit not as extreme version of this, happens in the Japanese videogame video game industry when describing foreign versions of a game: When a Japanese videogame video game is released in western countries and described in Japanese media, the western version is ''never'' called as such (In Japanese 西洋版 "seiyou-ban"), but as "the overseas/foreign version" instead (海外版, "kaigai-ban"). In this case, this is justified, as many Japanese companies release their games in other Asian countries besides the western ones, even if the ones geared for America and Europe are different from the Japanese and Asian ones.[[note]]Keep in mind in Japan and East Asia, their definition of "the western world" is very different, as what they consider the "West" also includes at times Eastern Europe, Israel and some times, even Middle Eastern countries, on the grounds they share similar cultural traits, compared with the ones based in the Sinosphere (China, Japan, both Koreas, Vietnam, Thailand, etc.).[[/note]]

Added DiffLines:

A similar, albeit not as extreme version of this, happens in the Japanese videogame industry when describing foreign versions of a game: When a Japanese videogame is released in western countries and described in Japanese media, the western version is ''never'' called as such (In Japanese 西洋版 "seiyou-ban"), but as "the overseas/foreign version" instead (海外版, "kaigai-ban"). In this case, this is justified, as many Japanese companies release their games in other Asian countries besides the western ones, even if the ones geared for America and Europe are different from the Japanese and Asian ones.[[note]]Keep in mind in Japan and East Asia, their definition of "the western world" is very different, as what they consider the "West" also includes at times Eastern Europe, Israel and some times, even Middle Eastern countries, on the grounds they share similar cultural traits, compared with the ones based in the Sinosphere (China, Japan, both Koreas, Vietnam, Thailand, etc.).[[/note]]


''Kotobagari'' ("word hunting") refers to the censorship of words considered politically incorrect in the JapaneseLanguage. It often conveys negative connotations that sarcastically criticize the [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad excess persistence in political correctness]]. Words such as...

to:

''Kotobagari'' ("word hunting") refers to the censorship of words considered politically incorrect in the JapaneseLanguage.UsefulNotes/JapaneseLanguage. It often conveys negative connotations that sarcastically criticize the [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad excess persistence in political correctness]]. Words such as...


* ''TabletopGame/VampireTheRequiem'' has the Burakumin bloodline - and lately, the word "burakumin" has been deemed offensive as well, at least according to TheOtherWiki. The bloodline originated within the mortal burakumin, and their bloodline weakness is that it's much harder for them to gain respect (the Status Merit, no matter what it's status in, is twice as expensive).

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* ''TabletopGame/VampireTheRequiem'' has the Burakumin bloodline - and lately, the word "burakumin" has been deemed offensive as well, at least according to TheOtherWiki.Wiki/TheOtherWiki. The bloodline originated within the mortal burakumin, and their bloodline weakness is that it's much harder for them to gain respect (the Status Merit, no matter what it's status in, is twice as expensive).

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[[AC:VisualNovels]]
* While originally released in English, the title of ''VisualNovel/KatawaShoujo'' invokes this since it would translate it as "Crippled Girls"


In short, this is Japan's version of "Political Correctness". It's disturbingly common when the subjects of Japan's WorldWarII atrocities and its discriminated minorities come up.

to:

In short, this is Japan's version of "Political Correctness". It's disturbingly common when the subjects of Japan's WorldWarII UsefulNotes/WorldWarII atrocities and its discriminated minorities come up.


* In the original manga of ''KeroroGunsou'', the aliens called Earth "Pokopen," which was a derogatory word that the Japanese used for China during the Sino-Japanese Wars. (Yes, it's a deliberate TakeThat.) However, Japanese broadcast authorities won't let people use the word, so we get "Pekopon" instead. Some dubs change it back to "Pokopen".

to:

* In the original manga of ''KeroroGunsou'', ''Manga/SgtFrog'', the aliens called Earth "Pokopen," which was a derogatory word that the Japanese used for China during the Sino-Japanese Wars. (Yes, it's a deliberate TakeThat.) However, Japanese broadcast authorities won't let people use the word, so we get "Pekopon" instead. Some dubs change it back to "Pokopen".


* ''LegendOfTheFiveRings'', set in a fantasy-world take on feudal Japan crossbred with warring-states China, has the lowest social class as "eta". One wonders how they would handle that in a Japanese printing.

to:

* ''LegendOfTheFiveRings'', ''TabletopGame/LegendOfTheFiveRings'', set in a fantasy-world take on feudal Japan crossbred with warring-states China, has the lowest social class as "eta". One wonders how they would handle that in a Japanese printing.



* ''VampireTheRequiem'' has the Burakumin bloodline - and lately, the word "burakumin" has been deemed offensive as well, at least according to TheOtherWiki. The bloodline originated within the mortal burakumin, and their bloodline weakness is that it's much harder for them to gain respect (the Status Merit, no matter what it's status in, is twice as expensive).

to:

* ''VampireTheRequiem'' ''TabletopGame/VampireTheRequiem'' has the Burakumin bloodline - and lately, the word "burakumin" has been deemed offensive as well, at least according to TheOtherWiki. The bloodline originated within the mortal burakumin, and their bloodline weakness is that it's much harder for them to gain respect (the Status Merit, no matter what it's status in, is twice as expensive).


Sometimes, kotobagari leads to confusing terminology. NHK, the Japanese Broadcasting Company, runs a Korean language study program, but the language is called "Hangul" to avoid being politically incorrect. This is a result of both the North and South Korean governments demanding that the program be called by the name of one country. North Korea wanted the show to be called "Chosŏn language", taken from its full name, ''Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk'' (Democratic People's Republic of Korea). South Korea wanted "Kankoku language", from the Korean name of ''Daehan Minguk'' "Republic of Korea" (the characters would be pronounced "Daikan Minkoku'' in Japanese; literally translated, "The Greater Han Popular State"). As a compromise, "Hangul" was selected, but this has led to the inappropriate usage of the term "Hangul" to refer to the Korean language. Which is like calling the English language "Alphabet".

to:

Sometimes, kotobagari leads to confusing terminology. NHK, the Japanese Broadcasting Company, runs a Korean language study program, but the language is called "Hangul" to avoid being politically incorrect. This is a result of both the North and South Korean governments demanding that the program be called by the name of one country. North Korea wanted the show to be called "Chosŏn language", taken from its full name, ''Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk'' (Democratic People's Republic of Korea). South Korea wanted "Kankoku language", from the Korean name of ''Daehan Minguk'' "Republic of Korea" (the characters would be pronounced "Daikan Minkoku'' in Japanese; literally translated, "The Greater Han Korean Popular State"). As a compromise, "Hangul" was selected, but this has led to the inappropriate usage of the term "Hangul" to refer to the Korean language. Which is like calling the English language "Alphabet".


Sometimes, kotobagari leads to confusing terminology. NHK, the Japanese Broadcasting Company, runs a Korean language study program, but the language is called "Hangul" to avoid being politically incorrect. This is a result of both the North and South Korean governments demanding that the program be called by the name of one country. North Korea wanted the show to be called "Chosŏn language", taken from its full name, ''Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk'' (Democratic People's Republic of Korea). South Korea wanted "Kankoku language", from the Korean name of ''Daehan Minguk'' "Republic of Korea" (the characters would be pronounced "Daikan Minkoku'' in Japanese; literally translated, "The Greater Han Popular State"). As a compromise, "Hangul" was selected, but this has led to the inappropriate usage of the term "Hangul" to refer to the Korean language. Which is like calling the English language the "Alphabet".

In short, this is Japan's version of "Political Correctness". It's disturbingly common when the subjects of Japan's WorldWarII atrocities and its discriminated minorities comes up.

to:

Sometimes, kotobagari leads to confusing terminology. NHK, the Japanese Broadcasting Company, runs a Korean language study program, but the language is called "Hangul" to avoid being politically incorrect. This is a result of both the North and South Korean governments demanding that the program be called by the name of one country. North Korea wanted the show to be called "Chosŏn language", taken from its full name, ''Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk'' (Democratic People's Republic of Korea). South Korea wanted "Kankoku language", from the Korean name of ''Daehan Minguk'' "Republic of Korea" (the characters would be pronounced "Daikan Minkoku'' in Japanese; literally translated, "The Greater Han Popular State"). As a compromise, "Hangul" was selected, but this has led to the inappropriate usage of the term "Hangul" to refer to the Korean language. Which is like calling the English language the "Alphabet".

In short, this is Japan's version of "Political Correctness". It's disturbingly common when the subjects of Japan's WorldWarII atrocities and its discriminated minorities comes come up.


Now ''youmuin'' is considered demeaning, so there is a shift towards using ''koumuin'' ("school task member") or ''kanrisagyouin'' ("maintenance member") instead. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Pinker Linguist Stephen Pinker]] calls this shift the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphemism_treadmill#Euphemism_treadmill euphemism treadmill]]. This tends to give rise to {{Unusual Euphemism}}s

to:

Now ''youmuin'' is considered demeaning, so there is a shift towards using ''koumuin'' ("school task member") or ''kanrisagyouin'' ("maintenance member") instead. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Pinker Linguist Stephen Pinker]] calls this shift the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphemism_treadmill#Euphemism_treadmill org/wiki/Euphemism#Evolution euphemism treadmill]]. This tends to give rise to {{Unusual Euphemism}}s


* Generally, explicit references to drugs ''by name'' or explicitly describing how to use them are prohibited. VisualKei bands, whose lyrics often reference drugs, have come up with a variety of strategies ranging from RefugeInAudacity to being the RulesLawyer, to use said lyrics or song titles. A couple of famous examples are Music/BuckTick's ''Speed,'' originally named ''Acid,'' but changed around so it could technically refer to "speed" in the sense of motion as opposed to the drug speed, with the line about popping a pill being censored in the official lyrics and only mouthed by Atsushi as he sings it, and Music/DirEnGrey's ''Egnirys Cimredopyh'' (read it backwards...).

to:

* Generally, explicit references to drugs other than alcohol or tobacco ''by name'' or explicitly describing how to use them are prohibited. VisualKei bands, whose lyrics often reference drugs, have come up with a variety of strategies ranging from RefugeInAudacity to being the RulesLawyer, to use said lyrics or song titles. A couple of famous examples are Music/BuckTick's ''Speed,'' originally named ''Acid,'' but changed around so it could technically refer to "speed" in the sense of motion as opposed to the drug speed, with the line about popping a pill being censored in the official lyrics and only mouthed by Atsushi as he sings it, and Music/DirEnGrey's ''Egnirys Cimredopyh'' (read it backwards...).

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