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Disaffected AntiHero Vindice returns home to get revenge on the lustful Duke who poisoned Vindice's beloved, Gloriana, when she refused to sleep with him. It's convoluted, disgusting and full of over-the-top gory acts of vengeance. Some people think that it was intended as a parody of the revenge-tragedy genre so popular at the time. And of ''{{Hamlet}}'' in particular (see TakeThat, below).

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Disaffected AntiHero Vindice returns home to get revenge on the lustful Duke who poisoned Vindice's beloved, Gloriana, when she refused to sleep with him. It's convoluted, disgusting and full of over-the-top gory acts of vengeance. Some people think that it was intended as a parody of the revenge-tragedy genre so popular at the time. And of ''{{Hamlet}}'' ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' in particular (see TakeThat, below).



* AlasPoorYorick: [[PlayingWithATrope Played with]]; since ''{{Hamlet}}'' came out a few years earlier, it's clearly poking fun at that scene.

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* AlasPoorYorick: [[PlayingWithATrope Played with]]; since ''{{Hamlet}}'' ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' came out a few years earlier, it's clearly poking fun at that scene.



* TakeThat: Several to the revenge-tragedy genre, and at ''{{Hamlet}}'' (which was first performed six years earlier) in particular.

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* TakeThat: Several to the revenge-tragedy genre, and at ''{{Hamlet}}'' ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' (which was first performed six years earlier) in particular.


There is a 2002 film adaptation which sets the play in post-apocalyptic Liverpool (or just Liverpool), and stars Creator/ChristopherEccleston as Vindice.

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There is a 2002 film adaptation which sets the play in post-apocalyptic Liverpool [[PlaceWorseThanDeath (or just Liverpool), Liverpool)]], and stars Creator/ChristopherEccleston as Vindice.


--> ''[[CrowningMomentOfFunny There it is!]]''

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--> ''[[CrowningMomentOfFunny ''[[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments There it is!]]''


%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.

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%% Administrivia.ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.


''The Revenger's Tragedy'' is a Jacobean {{Revenge}} play written in 1606 by (scholars now believe) Thomas Middleton. It was more widely attributed to Cyril Tourneur and some scholars (Frank Kermode) still list Tourneur as the main author to this day.

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''The Revenger's Tragedy'' is a Jacobean {{Revenge}} play written in 1606 by (scholars now believe) Thomas Middleton. It was is far more widely attributed to Cyril Tourneur and some scholars (Frank Kermode) still list Tourneur as the main author to this day.

Added DiffLines:

* GrievousHarmWithABody: Supervacuo beats the officer who brings news of Junior's death with Junior's severed head.


'''''The Revenger's Tragedy''''' is a Jacobean {{Revenge}} play written in 1606 by (scholars now believe) Thomas Middleton. It was more widely attributed to Cyril Tourneur and some scholars (Frank Kermode) still list Tourneur as the main author to this day.

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'''''The ''The Revenger's Tragedy''''' Tragedy'' is a Jacobean {{Revenge}} play written in 1606 by (scholars now believe) Thomas Middleton. It was more widely attributed to Cyril Tourneur and some scholars (Frank Kermode) still list Tourneur as the main author to this day.


!!This play provides examples of:

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!!This play film provides examples of:


* HiredToHuntYourself: After earning Lussurioso's ire as Piato, Vindice is hired as himself (well, a [[TheEeyore comically melancholy version of himself]]) to kill Piato.



* ImpersonationParadox: Vindice is asked by Lussurioso to find and kill Piato (his disguised self).


%%
%%
%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.
%%
%%



* AntiHero: Vindice.

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* %%* AntiHero: Vindice.



* CrapsackWorld: One of the most grim.

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* %%* CrapsackWorld: One of the most grim.



* DoubleEntendre: Dozens.
* HeWhoFightsMonsters: Vindice.

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* %%* DoubleEntendre: Dozens.
* %%* HeWhoFightsMonsters: Vindice.



* ItsPersonal

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* %%* ItsPersonal



* LongLostRelative: When Vindice returns home, he is one of these.
* MasterOfDisguise: Vindice, as Piato.

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* %%* LongLostRelative: When Vindice returns home, he is one of these.
* %%* MasterOfDisguise: Vindice, as Piato.



* MoralityPet: Gloriana, for Vindice.

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* %%* MoralityPet: Gloriana, for Vindice.



* {{Parody}}: Of revenge-tragedies.

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* %%* {{Parody}}: Of revenge-tragedies.



* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: Vindice.

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* %%* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: Vindice.



* ThoseTwoGuys: Vindice and Hippolito.
* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: Gloriana.
* UpperClassTwit: Lussurioso.
* UpToEleven: Vindice's revenge.

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* %%* ThoseTwoGuys: Vindice and Hippolito.
* %%* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: Gloriana.
* %%* UpperClassTwit: Lussurioso.
* %%* UpToEleven: Vindice's revenge.


* IncestIsRelative


'''''The Revenger's Tragedy''''' is a Jacobean {{Revenge}} play written in 1606 by (scholars now believe) Thomas Middleton.

to:

'''''The Revenger's Tragedy''''' is a Jacobean {{Revenge}} play written in 1606 by (scholars now believe) Thomas Middleton. \n It was more widely attributed to Cyril Tourneur and some scholars (Frank Kermode) still list Tourneur as the main author to this day.


* RealitySubtext: Since this play came out during the reign of James I, but the author is clearly looking back toward the days of [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Elizabeth I]], there are lots of references to women's virginity ("The Virgin Queen"), and anti-royal sentiments. (Not to mention that the name "Gloriana" was commonly used to refer to Elizabeth I in the poetry of her time.)



* AllStarCast: The 2002 film version has Creator/ChristopherEccleston as Vindice, Creator/EddieIzzard as Lussorioso, and Creator/DerekJacobi as the Duke.


* RealitySubtext: Since this play came out during the reign of James I, but the author is clearly looking back toward the days of Elizabeth I, there are lots of references to women's virginity ("TheVirginQueen"), and anti-royal sentiments. (Not to mention that the name "Gloriana" was commonly used to refer to Elizabeth I in the poetry of her time.)

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* RealitySubtext: Since this play came out during the reign of James I, but the author is clearly looking back toward the days of [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Elizabeth I, I]], there are lots of references to women's virginity ("TheVirginQueen"), ("The Virgin Queen"), and anti-royal sentiments. (Not to mention that the name "Gloriana" was commonly used to refer to Elizabeth I in the poetry of her time.)


* RealitySubtext: Since this play came out during the reign of James I, but the author is clearly looking back toward the days of ElizabethI, there are lots of references to women's virginity ("TheVirginQueen"), and anti-royal sentiments. (Not to mention that the name "Gloriana" was commonly used to refer to Elizabeth I in the poetry of her time.)

to:

* RealitySubtext: Since this play came out during the reign of James I, but the author is clearly looking back toward the days of ElizabethI, Elizabeth I, there are lots of references to women's virginity ("TheVirginQueen"), and anti-royal sentiments. (Not to mention that the name "Gloriana" was commonly used to refer to Elizabeth I in the poetry of her time.)

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