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* Gary Jennings' ''Aztec'' novel is a massive door stopper consisting approximately on 30% plot and about 70% info on precolombine cultures, their societies, religious beliefs and way of living. TropesAreNotBad, in part due to the rarity of creative works based on precolombine societies and the fact that few people know about them, a lot of people consider the investigation more entertaining that the novel itself.

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* Gary Jennings' ''Aztec'' novel is a massive door stopper consisting approximately on 30% plot and about 70% info on precolombine cultures, their societies, religious beliefs and way of living. TropesAreNotBad, Administrivia/TropesAreNotBad, in part due to the rarity of creative works based on precolombine societies and the fact that few people know about them, a lot of people consider the investigation more entertaining that the novel itself.

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** It's also known, however, that he has invented "sources" out of whole cloth. He's actually done it so much that he has admitted spending hours attempting to track down a source without being entirely sure if it's one he made up or not.


* ''Mortal Coils'' by Eric Nylund features an extremely detailed description of how chocolate is made. It includes lavish prose about cocoa butter oozing from roasted beans into crystal dishes and the gorgeous smells of all kinds of ingredients. Barring the partcipation of Satanic monk confectioners and choirboys singing hymns in a desecrated chapel, it's very accurate FoodPorn. This is especially striking considering how relatively little attention is paid to descriptions of women who are supposed to be supernaturally gorgeous. They get a few sentences; the chocolate gets an entire chapter.

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* ''Mortal Coils'' by Eric Nylund features an extremely detailed description of how chocolate is made. It includes lavish prose about cocoa butter oozing from roasted beans into crystal dishes and the gorgeous smells of all kinds of ingredients. Barring the partcipation of Satanic monk confectioners and choirboys singing hymns in a desecrated chapel, it's very accurate FoodPorn. This is especially striking considering how relatively little attention is paid to descriptions of women who are supposed to be supernaturally gorgeous. They get a few sentences; the chocolate gets an entire chapter.chapter.
* ''Creator/EEDocSmith'' has author's notes at the beginning of both his ''Literature/SkylarkSeries'' and ''Literature/{{Lensman}}'' series noting that he's entirely aware that relativity says nothing can travel faster than light, but that hardly makes for fun SpaceOpera.


*** The fact he worked for [[Series/{{Spooks}} MI5]] and [[SecretIntelligenceService MI6]] helps as well.

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*** The fact he worked for [[Series/{{Spooks}} MI5]] and [[SecretIntelligenceService [[UsefulNotes/SecretIntelligenceService MI6]] helps as well.


* It's pointed out in Chapter 8 of Grady Hendrix' ''Literature/PaperbacksFromHell'' that Jaron Summers' ''Below the Line'' "spends enough of its time laying out film financing and tax shelters in enough detail for any wannabe [[Creator/JerryBruckheimer Bruckheimer]] to follow."

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* It's pointed out in Chapter 8 of Grady Hendrix' ''Literature/PaperbacksFromHell'' that Jaron Summers' ''Below the Line'' "spends enough of its time laying out film financing and tax shelters in enough detail for any wannabe [[Creator/JerryBruckheimer Bruckheimer]] to follow.""
* ''Mortal Coils'' by Eric Nylund features an extremely detailed description of how chocolate is made. It includes lavish prose about cocoa butter oozing from roasted beans into crystal dishes and the gorgeous smells of all kinds of ingredients. Barring the partcipation of Satanic monk confectioners and choirboys singing hymns in a desecrated chapel, it's very accurate FoodPorn. This is especially striking considering how relatively little attention is paid to descriptions of women who are supposed to be supernaturally gorgeous. They get a few sentences; the chocolate gets an entire chapter.


* Aeron Clement did a lot of research when it cames to ''Literature/TheColdMoons''. The badgers may be {{Partially Civilized Animal}}s with their own peaceful society, but they're still badgers nevertheless. The book references more obscure facts, such as how most sows act aggressive towards their mates during birthing and how sows can withhold implantation in times of distress. There's also a lot of research on the Welsh wilderness, with [[SceneryPorn many references]] to wild plants, grasses, berries, and SeldomSeenSpecies of animals.

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* Aeron Clement did a lot of research when it cames to ''Literature/TheColdMoons''. The badgers may be {{Partially Civilized Animal}}s with their own peaceful society, but they're still badgers nevertheless. The book references more obscure facts, such as how most sows act aggressive towards their mates during birthing and how sows can withhold implantation in times of distress. There's also a lot of research on the Welsh wilderness, with [[SceneryPorn many references]] to wild plants, grasses, berries, and SeldomSeenSpecies of animals.animals.
* It's pointed out in Chapter 8 of Grady Hendrix' ''Literature/PaperbacksFromHell'' that Jaron Summers' ''Below the Line'' "spends enough of its time laying out film financing and tax shelters in enough detail for any wannabe [[Creator/JerryBruckheimer Bruckheimer]] to follow."


* ''Literature/ChanceAndChoicesAdventures'' shows off a lot of historically accurate items and ideas from its setting (1830's-1840's Arkansas) including some remarkably obscure things like the [[CoolGuns Lefaucheux 20-Shot revolver]].

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* ''Literature/ChanceAndChoicesAdventures'' shows off a lot of historically accurate items and ideas from its setting (1830's-1840's Arkansas) including some remarkably obscure things like the [[CoolGuns Lefaucheux 20-Shot revolver]].revolver]].
* Aeron Clement did a lot of research when it cames to ''Literature/TheColdMoons''. The badgers may be {{Partially Civilized Animal}}s with their own peaceful society, but they're still badgers nevertheless. The book references more obscure facts, such as how most sows act aggressive towards their mates during birthing and how sows can withhold implantation in times of distress. There's also a lot of research on the Welsh wilderness, with [[SceneryPorn many references]] to wild plants, grasses, berries, and SeldomSeenSpecies of animals.


Alternate explanation: there *is* no problem with forging a double-edged sword in which a hard steel edge is welded around a bar of low-quality steel or iron (the layer- and pattern-forging methods of Japan and Europe, respectively, were developed to make horrible slaggy nasty impure iron into good iron/low-quality steel by repeated heating and hammering. You end up with a relative fraction of the metal you started with. But it's decent metal - this is why all that work, not because it made super-wonderful swords. It just made it possible to make adequate swords. Such swords were common in the Migration and Viking Age: the sword from Sutton Hoo, for instance, is a double-edger with a hard steel edge and soft core, as was the reproduction made, using the same materials and techniques of the place and time, for Dr. Hilda Ellis-Davidson (The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England). The combination allowed both a good cutting edge and the ability for a sword to take an impact without shattering - same reason the best axes are, or were, usually made with a hard steel edge welded onto a softer eye/most of the blade. The curvature of the samurai sword is not based on the characteristics of the metals differing with the same heat! The back is specifically insulated with clay during the process to keep it cooler so that the edge can be fully hardened while the back remains able to bear the shock of impact. So the slight curve is achieved by *differential* heating.

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Alternate explanation: there *is* no problem with forging a double-edged sword in which a hard steel edge is welded around a bar of low-quality steel or iron (the layer- and pattern-forging methods of Japan and Europe, respectively, were developed to make horrible slaggy nasty impure iron into good iron/low-quality steel by repeated heating and hammering. You end up with a relative fraction of the metal you started with. But it's decent metal - this is why all that work, not because it made super-wonderful swords. It just made it possible to make adequate swords.swords). Such swords were common in the Migration and Viking Age: the sword from Sutton Hoo, for instance, is a double-edger with a hard steel edge and soft core, as was the reproduction made, using the same materials and techniques of the place and time, for Dr. Hilda Ellis-Davidson (The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England). The combination allowed both a good cutting edge and the ability for a sword to take an impact without shattering - same reason the best axes are, or were, usually made with a hard steel edge welded onto a softer eye/most of the blade. The curvature of the samurai sword is not based on the characteristics of the metals differing with the same heat! The back is specifically insulated with clay during the process to keep it cooler so that the edge can be fully hardened while the back remains able to bear the shock of impact. So the slight curve is achieved by *differential* heating.

Added DiffLines:

Alternate explanation: there *is* no problem with forging a double-edged sword in which a hard steel edge is welded around a bar of low-quality steel or iron (the layer- and pattern-forging methods of Japan and Europe, respectively, were developed to make horrible slaggy nasty impure iron into good iron/low-quality steel by repeated heating and hammering. You end up with a relative fraction of the metal you started with. But it's decent metal - this is why all that work, not because it made super-wonderful swords. It just made it possible to make adequate swords. Such swords were common in the Migration and Viking Age: the sword from Sutton Hoo, for instance, is a double-edger with a hard steel edge and soft core, as was the reproduction made, using the same materials and techniques of the place and time, for Dr. Hilda Ellis-Davidson (The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England). The combination allowed both a good cutting edge and the ability for a sword to take an impact without shattering - same reason the best axes are, or were, usually made with a hard steel edge welded onto a softer eye/most of the blade. The curvature of the samurai sword is not based on the characteristics of the metals differing with the same heat! The back is specifically insulated with clay during the process to keep it cooler so that the edge can be fully hardened while the back remains able to bear the shock of impact. So the slight curve is achieved by *differential* heating.


* In the short story "Literature/ImpossibleDreams" by Tim Pratt, Pete discovers a video store from an AlternateUniverse called Impossible Dreams Video and becomes fascinated with the [[DifferentWorldDifferentMovies differences that exist between the films made in this universe and his own]]. All of the films mentioned in the story that are not products of Pratt's imagination are either films that were never made as they became stuck in DevelopmentHell or existing films that were originally to have had different stars and/or directors.

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* In the short story "Literature/ImpossibleDreams" by Tim Pratt, Pete discovers a video store from an AlternateUniverse called Impossible Dreams Video and becomes fascinated with the [[DifferentWorldDifferentMovies differences that exist between the films made in this universe and his own]]. All of the films mentioned in the story that are not products of Pratt's imagination are either films that were never made as they became stuck in DevelopmentHell or existing films that were originally to have had different stars and/or directors.directors.
* ''Literature/ChanceAndChoicesAdventures'' shows off a lot of historically accurate items and ideas from its setting (1830's-1840's Arkansas) including some remarkably obscure things like the [[CoolGuns Lefaucheux 20-Shot revolver]].


* A.P. Herbert's ''Misleading Cases in the Common Law'' may seem to tick most of the boxes in YouFailLawForever, only getting away with it thanks to the RuleOfFunny. In fact, he was a barrister and MP, and the point of the book is that the cases described, while ludicrous, ''could'' happen under English law.

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* A.P. Herbert's ''Misleading Cases in the Common Law'' may seem to tick most of the boxes in YouFailLawForever, ArtisticLicenseLaw, only getting away with it thanks to the RuleOfFunny. In fact, he was a barrister and MP, and the point of the book is that the cases described, while ludicrous, ''could'' happen under English law.



** A shame that he coupled it with the classic [[YouFailBiologyForever SF howler]], the desert ecology consisting entirely of large predators with no prey species and no food plants.

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** A shame that he coupled it with the classic [[YouFailBiologyForever [[ArtisticLicenseBiology SF howler]], the desert ecology consisting entirely of large predators with no prey species and no food plants.



** Averted with the battle in [[YouFailGeographyForever Walnut Creek, California and the description of Mt. Diablo]]. Firstly Walnut Creek has no Eucalyptus trees anywhere; two, Mt. Diablo has no serious cliffsides; three, the top of Mt. Diablo has a visitor's center,not a depression with eucalyptus trees. Also, eucalyptus trees' scent is not as strong as the series implies.

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** Averted with the battle in [[YouFailGeographyForever [[ArtisticLicenseGeography Walnut Creek, California and the description of Mt. Diablo]]. Firstly Walnut Creek has no Eucalyptus trees anywhere; two, Mt. Diablo has no serious cliffsides; three, the top of Mt. Diablo has a visitor's center,not a depression with eucalyptus trees. Also, eucalyptus trees' scent is not as strong as the series implies.


* ''Literature/TheJenkinsVerse'': The main series, "the Deathworlders," has a lot of information on how ridiculously tough and strong human beings are, and how frail the aliens are in comparison. In fact, the author had to remove some of the precise numbers [[RealityIsUnrealistic because they sounded like an exaggeration]].

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* ''Literature/TheJenkinsVerse'': The main series, "the Deathworlders," has a lot of information on how ridiculously tough and strong human beings are, and how frail the aliens are in comparison. In fact, the author had to remove some of the precise numbers [[RealityIsUnrealistic because they sounded like an exaggeration]].exaggeration]].
* In the short story "Literature/ImpossibleDreams" by Tim Pratt, Pete discovers a video store from an AlternateUniverse called Impossible Dreams Video and becomes fascinated with the [[DifferentWorldDifferentMovies differences that exist between the films made in this universe and his own]]. All of the films mentioned in the story that are not products of Pratt's imagination are either films that were never made as they became stuck in DevelopmentHell or existing films that were originally to have had different stars and/or directors.


* Creator/TadWilliams did extensive research on cats, cat behavior, and cat biology while writing ''Literature/TailchasersSong''. ''Cat Fanciers'' magazine even praised the book for its accuracy.

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* Creator/TadWilliams did extensive research on cats, cat behavior, and cat biology while writing ''Literature/TailchasersSong''. ''Cat Fanciers'' magazine even praised the book for its accuracy.accuracy.
* ''Literature/TheJenkinsVerse'': The main series, "the Deathworlders," has a lot of information on how ridiculously tough and strong human beings are, and how frail the aliens are in comparison. In fact, the author had to remove some of the precise numbers [[RealityIsUnrealistic because they sounded like an exaggeration]].


* Bernard Cornwell's ''{{Sharpe}}'' novels, which follow a fictional British soldier through the Napoleonic Wars, offer extremely accurate depections of life in the army, 19th century warfare, historic battles and events, and the [[HistoricalDomainCharacter important people involved in all three]] (particularly UsefulNotes/TheDukeOfWellington, since the novels are loosely structured around his campaigns). Individual novels are often built around a specific battle, such as the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Talavera Battle of Talavera]] in ''Sharpe's Eagle'', and they are described in great detail. Each novel ends with a Historic Note, which Cornwell uses to throw in extra info about the period and point out the few places where he's taken dramatic licence with history, as well as what actually occured.

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* Bernard Cornwell's ''{{Sharpe}}'' ''Literature/{{Sharpe}}'' novels, which follow a fictional British soldier through the Napoleonic Wars, offer extremely accurate depections of life in the army, 19th century warfare, historic battles and events, and the [[HistoricalDomainCharacter important people involved in all three]] (particularly UsefulNotes/TheDukeOfWellington, since the novels are loosely structured around his campaigns). Individual novels are often built around a specific battle, such as the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Talavera Battle of Talavera]] in ''Sharpe's Eagle'', and they are described in great detail. Each novel ends with a Historic Note, which Cornwell uses to throw in extra info about the period and point out the few places where he's taken dramatic licence with history, as well as what actually occured.


** His new series, Safehold, is an egregious example of the trope. For those who haven't read it, humanity has regressed to technology level the same as about 1500 CE, and then goes on an accelerated progression from there. Since Weber is a military historian by trade, expect ridiculously detailed analysis of logistics, minute details of sailing equipment (he specifies both the circumference and diameter of a rope on multiple occasions, though anyone with grade school geometry can get one from the other, usually in their head. Hint: the circumference is a little more than three times the diameter.), and whole chapters with characters discussing the exact origins and mechanisms of the newest inventions. Also worth noting are the long, ponderous internal monologues he is famous for, even when it seems like a page-long or longer monologue is crammed into a split second of time (see Talking is a Free Action).

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** His new series, Safehold, is an egregious example of the trope. For those who haven't read it, humanity has regressed to technology level the same as about 1500 CE, and then goes on an accelerated progression from there. Since Weber is a military historian by trade, expect ridiculously detailed analysis of logistics, minute details of sailing equipment (he specifies both the circumference and diameter of a rope on multiple occasions, though anyone with grade school geometry can get one from the other, usually in their head. Hint: the circumference is a little more than three times the diameter.), and whole chapters with characters discussing the exact origins and mechanisms of the newest inventions. Also worth noting are the long, ponderous internal monologues he is famous for, even when it seems like [[TalkingIsAFreeAction a page-long or longer monologue is crammed into a split second of time (see Talking is a Free Action).time.]]

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