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* It is the nature of major [[CosmicRetcon Cosmic Retcons]] to do this to all previous continuity. ''ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' ''ComicBook/FlashPoint,'' etc.

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* It is the nature of major [[CosmicRetcon Cosmic Retcons]] to do this to all parts of previous continuity. ''ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' ''ComicBook/FlashPoint,'' etc.


* ''Invincible Comicbook/IronMan Annual'' #1 tells the story of a director who is forced to make a biopic about the Mandarin after he and his wife are kidnapped and threatened with death. Rather than tell the Mandarin's bloated, egotistical and self-serving version of the events, the director and his crew [[WriterRevolt eventually decide to make an unflattering film]] that will expose the world to the ''true'' Mandarin. The director concocts a plan to escape with his wife during the movie's premier, but everything goes to hell when it turns out that she had actually been mentally conditioned by the Mandarin, likely in case of such a betrayal. The director is killed by his brainwashed wife, his loyal crew members are also eliminated, and the film itself is destroyed before anyone in the outside world can ever see it, ultimately making all of the director's efforts for nothing.

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* ''Invincible Comicbook/IronMan Annual'' #1 tells the story of a director who is forced to make a biopic about the Mandarin after he and his wife are kidnapped and threatened with death. Rather than tell the Mandarin's bloated, egotistical and self-serving version of the events, the director and his crew [[WriterRevolt eventually decide to make an unflattering film]] that will expose the world to the ''true'' Mandarin.Mandarin to the world. The director concocts a plan to escape with his wife during the movie's premier, but everything goes to hell when it turns out that she had actually been mentally conditioned by the Mandarin, likely in case of such a betrayal. The director is killed by his brainwashed wife, his loyal crew members are also eliminated, and the film itself is destroyed before anyone in the outside world can ever see it, ultimately making all of the director's efforts for nothing.


* ''Invincible Comicbook/IronMan Annual'' #1 tells the story of a director who is forced to make a biopic about the Mandarin after he and his wife are kidnapped and threatened with death. Rather than tell the Mandarin's bloated, egotistical and self-serving version of the events, the director and his crew seek to make an unflattering film that will expose the world to the ''true'' Mandarin. The director concocts a plan to escape with his wife during the movie's premier, but everything goes to hell when it turns out that she had actually been mentally conditioned by the Mandarin, likely in case of such a betrayal. The director is killed by his brainwashed wife, his loyal crew members are also eliminated, and the film itself is destroyed before anyone in the outside world can ever see it, ultimately making all of the director's efforts for nothing.

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* ''Invincible Comicbook/IronMan Annual'' #1 tells the story of a director who is forced to make a biopic about the Mandarin after he and his wife are kidnapped and threatened with death. Rather than tell the Mandarin's bloated, egotistical and self-serving version of the events, the director and his crew seek [[WriterRevolt eventually decide to make an unflattering film film]] that will expose the world to the ''true'' Mandarin. The director concocts a plan to escape with his wife during the movie's premier, but everything goes to hell when it turns out that she had actually been mentally conditioned by the Mandarin, likely in case of such a betrayal. The director is killed by his brainwashed wife, his loyal crew members are also eliminated, and the film itself is destroyed before anyone in the outside world can ever see it, ultimately making all of the director's efforts for nothing.

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* ''Invincible Comicbook/IronMan Annual'' #1 tells the story of a director who is forced to make a biopic about the Mandarin after he and his wife are kidnapped and threatened with death. Rather than tell the Mandarin's bloated, egotistical and self-serving version of the events, the director and his crew seek to make an unflattering film that will expose the world to the ''true'' Mandarin. The director concocts a plan to escape with his wife during the movie's premier, but everything goes to hell when it turns out that she had actually been mentally conditioned by the Mandarin, likely in case of such a betrayal. The director is killed by his brainwashed wife, his loyal crew members are also eliminated, and the film itself is destroyed before anyone in the outside world can ever see it, ultimately making all of the director's efforts for nothing.

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* Near the end of ''ComicBook/{{Maus}}'' Vladek relates a story about a Jew who survived all of the Nazi atrocities and returned to his home in Poland, only to be killed by a group of Polish squatters living in his abandoned house.

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* ''ComicBook/TheNew52FuturesEnd'' became infamous for this. It's forty-nine issues dedicated to the premise: [[Comicbook/BatmanBeyond Terry McGinnis]] goes back in time to prevent a BadFuture where Brother Eye creates a [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot cyborg zombie]] [[ZombieApocalypse apocalypse]]. Aside from the fact that many of its subplots have little or nothing to do with that story and/or go nowhere, the series ends with Terry dying, an adult [[Comicbook/RobinSeries Tim Drake]] taking up his quest and...''not'' stopping the cyborg zombie apocalypse. It's technically a ''slightly better'' apocalypse, as there are a few more survivors (including Tim's girlfriend from this series), but that doesn't seem quite worth the $100 that one spent to read this many issues. For what it's worth, this led to a new ''Comicbook/BatmanBeyond'' series that tried to undo the apocalypse as quickly as it could, perhaps realizing that [[AudienceAlienatingPremise nobody wanted another series based on it]].


* ''SelfDemonstrating/{{Deadpool}}'' #250 is a particularly cruel example of this. The entire issue features Deadpool desperately trying to protect his friends and daughter after they've been targeted by the ULTIMATUM organization. He eventually manages to kill the terrorists, and afterwards, decides to retire from his life of violence to be with his child. Just as Deadpool and the others begin to celebrate his new beginning, the entire planet is destroyed during a collision with the ComicBook/UltimateMarvel Earth, kick-starting the events of ''[[Comicbook/SecretWars2015 Secret Wars]]''.

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* ''SelfDemonstrating/{{Deadpool}}'' #250 is a particularly cruel example of this. The entire issue features Deadpool desperately trying to protect his friends and daughter after they've been targeted by the ULTIMATUM organization. He eventually manages to kill the terrorists, and afterwards, decides to retire from his life of violence to be with his child. Just as Deadpool and the others begin to celebrate his new beginning, the entire planet is destroyed during a collision with the ComicBook/UltimateMarvel Earth, kick-starting the events of ''[[Comicbook/SecretWars2015 Secret Wars]]''. Eventually subverted when Wade and all of the other characters are brought back to life during the ''Comicbook/AllNewAllDifferentMarvel'' relaunch.



* One old issue of ''Magazine/{{Mad}}'' featured Al Jaffee's story, "The Meanign of Life". The protagonist was a dirty, smelly guy named Marvin, who was upset because [[ThisLoserIsYou he was a nobody.]] One day, he hears a voice, who suggests getting himself cleaned up. Marvin does, but he's still a nobody, a sweet-smelling nobody. The voice talks to him again, telling him he looks rotten and decrepit. So Marvin gets plastic surgery, a better hairstyle, and cleaner clothes, but he's still a nobody, a sweet-smelling, good-looking nobody. The voice speaks again, telling him he should try being more articulate in his speech. So he attends speech therapy classes, but is still a nobody, a sweet-smelling, good-looking, articulate nobody. The voice appears again, telling him to try being less crude and vulgar. So he takes music, theatre, and etiquite classes. Unfortunately, now he's a [[OverlyLongGag sweet-smelling, good-looking, articulate, cultured nobody.]] [[spoiler:Finally, the voice tells him that the true reason he's a loser is because he's being selfish, and if he finds someone who is just as much a nobody as he is, he can find purpose and be somebody. Marvin searches the world up and down, and finally finds someone who seems just like he was at the start; he's happy for a minute... but then the guy shoots and kills him. The final panel shows the killer behind his own WantedPoster, which describes him, ("Arnold Acne", Public Enemy #1) as "Ugly, smelly, inarticulate, uncultured, selfish, and ''very'' dangerous."]]
* A comic in the StarWars extended universe follows a naive young Imperial recruit through his training and service as a Storm Trooper and his growing disillusionment with the Empire. The final straw is being sent with Darth Vader into a captured transport ship - Vader is such a monster that he decides then and there that he's going to go [=AWOL=] and join the rebels. [[HeelFaceDoorSlam Then Leia shoots him and he dies.]]

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* One old issue of ''Magazine/{{Mad}}'' featured Al Jaffee's story, "The Meanign Meaning of Life". The protagonist was a dirty, smelly guy named Marvin, who was upset because [[ThisLoserIsYou he was a nobody.]] One day, he hears a voice, who suggests getting himself cleaned up. Marvin does, but he's still a nobody, a sweet-smelling nobody. The voice talks to him again, telling him he looks rotten and decrepit. So Marvin gets plastic surgery, a better hairstyle, and cleaner clothes, but he's still a nobody, a sweet-smelling, good-looking nobody. The voice speaks again, telling him he should try being more articulate in his speech. So he attends speech therapy classes, but is still a nobody, a sweet-smelling, good-looking, articulate nobody. The voice appears again, telling him to try being less crude and vulgar. So he takes music, theatre, and etiquite etiquette classes. Unfortunately, now he's a [[OverlyLongGag sweet-smelling, good-looking, articulate, cultured nobody.]] [[spoiler:Finally, the voice tells him that the true reason he's a loser is because he's being selfish, and if he finds someone who is just as much a nobody as he is, he can find purpose and be somebody. Marvin searches the world up and down, and finally finds someone who seems just like he was at the start; he's happy for a minute... but then the guy shoots and kills him. The final panel shows the killer behind his own WantedPoster, which describes him, ("Arnold Acne", Public Enemy #1) as "Ugly, smelly, inarticulate, uncultured, selfish, and ''very'' dangerous."]]
* A comic story in the StarWars extended universe ''Comicbook/StarWarsTales'' #10 follows a naive young Imperial recruit through his training and service as a Storm Trooper and his growing disillusionment with the Empire. The final straw is being sent with Darth Vader into a captured transport ship - Vader is such a monster that he decides then and there that he's going to go [=AWOL=] and join the rebels. [[HeelFaceDoorSlam Then Leia shoots him and he dies.]]

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* ''Druuna'': In some of the later albums, Druuna spends a lot of time inside the disembodied HiveMind of Captain Lewis to find a cure for the mutant disease. She eventually discovers that [[spoiler:there is no cure, as the disease is tied to the human genome itself. She wakes up with everyone else on board either dead or in hyperstasis in hopes that somebody will save them someday. Druuna chooses to go into an endless dream to forget about it.]]


* ''PlanetHulk'', granted it was pretty damn obvious that Hulk was going to be brought back to Earth by a storyline at some point, but to have a damaged warp-engine (placed by rebels as stated in ''ComicBook/WorldWarHulk'' though supposed ally Miek allowed them to do so) explode and effectively destroy everything he had spent a good portion of the novel building towards, a wife, future child, kingdom, peace and acceptance as a respected and admired being in the last few pages seems to fit this trope to a T.

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* ''PlanetHulk'', ''ComicBook/PlanetHulk'', granted it was pretty damn obvious that Hulk was going to be brought back to Earth by a storyline at some point, but to have a damaged warp-engine (placed by rebels as stated in ''ComicBook/WorldWarHulk'' though supposed ally Miek allowed them to do so) explode and effectively destroy everything he had spent a good portion of the novel building towards, a wife, future child, kingdom, peace and acceptance as a respected and admired being in the last few pages seems to fit this trope to a T.

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* A comic in the StarWars extended universe follows a naive young Imperial recruit through his training and service as a Storm Trooper and his growing disillusionment with the Empire. The final straw is being sent with Darth Vader into a captured transport ship - Vader is such a monster that he decides then and there that he's going to go [=AWOL=] and join the rebels. [[HeelFaceDoorSlam Then Leia shoots him and he dies.]]


** It gets worse within the context of the rest of the ''Starman'' series. Mist II, having carried out a perfect plan where she kills 3 superheroes and get away with it goes on to do...um, nothing really. She reunites with her evil father, dutifully obeys his orders (which mostly involve standing by the sidelines durng the GrandFinale), both Starman and her father deprecate her entire criminal career to her face, and finally her own father kills her to [[KickTheDog show off how evil]] ''he'' is. The only relevance that earlier group slaughter of the JLE has comes when she tries to brag about it and Starman [[ShutUpHannibal shuts her up]]...by [[TakeThat calling her murder victims "easy targets".]]

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** It gets worse within the context of the rest of the ''Starman'' series. Mist II, having carried out a perfect plan where she kills 3 superheroes and get away with it goes on to do...um, nothing really. She reunites with her evil father, dutifully obeys his orders (which mostly involve standing by the sidelines durng during the GrandFinale), both Starman and her father deprecate her entire criminal career to her face, and finally her own father kills her to [[KickTheDog show off how evil]] ''he'' is. The only relevance that earlier group slaughter of the JLE has comes when she tries to brag about it and Starman [[ShutUpHannibal shuts her up]]...by [[TakeThat calling her murder victims "easy targets".]]


* This happens sometimes in ComicBook/ChickTracts. In "Fatal Decision," in which the doctor sells all his stocks and bonds to afford a vaccine for a patient, loses his son in an auto accident on the way there, and arrives to give it to the patient. The patient destroys the vaccine because a disgruntled orderly manipulated him into distrusting the doctor, resulting in him dying a few days later. In case you can't tell, the doctor is {{God}}, his son is UsefulNotes{/{Jesus}}, the vaccine is salvation, the orderly is {{Satan}}, and the patient is those who reject God's salvation.

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* This happens sometimes in ComicBook/ChickTracts. In "Fatal Decision," in which the doctor sells all his stocks and bonds to afford a vaccine for a patient, loses his son in an auto accident on the way there, and arrives to give it to the patient. The patient destroys the vaccine because a disgruntled orderly manipulated him into distrusting the doctor, resulting in him dying a few days later. In case you can't tell, the doctor is {{God}}, his son is UsefulNotes{/{Jesus}}, UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}}, the vaccine is salvation, the orderly is {{Satan}}, and the patient is those who reject God's salvation.


* ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'' (vol. 5) #7 is a DayInTheLimelight issue focused on Jack Monroe, Cap's former partner. After having a psychotic relapse, Jack dons his Nomad costume and sets out to rid the world of a powerful drug dealer who is selling their product to children. He has no luck finding the dealer, and is eventually shot and killed by the [[BuckyBarnes Winter Soldier]]. The final page then reveals that it was all for nothing anyway, as the "dealer" was actually an ice cream salesman who was jokingly bragging about getting kids "addicted" to his treats.

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* ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'' (vol. 5) #7 is a DayInTheLimelight issue focused on Jack Monroe, Cap's former partner. After having a psychotic relapse, Jack dons his Nomad costume and sets out to rid the world of a powerful drug dealer who is selling their product to children. He has no luck finding the dealer, and is eventually shot and killed by the [[BuckyBarnes Winter Soldier]].ComicBook/WinterSoldier. The final page then reveals that it was all for nothing anyway, as the "dealer" was actually an ice cream salesman who was jokingly bragging about getting kids "addicted" to his treats.


* ''PlanetHulk'', granted it was pretty damn obvious that Hulk was going to be brought back to Earth by a storyline at some point, but to have a damaged warp-engine (placed by rebels as stated in ''WorldWarHulk'' though supposed ally Miek allowed them to do so) explode and effectively destroy everything he had spent a good portion of the novel building towards, a wife, future child, kingdom, peace and acceptance as a respected and admired being in the last few pages seems to fit this trope to a T.

to:

* ''PlanetHulk'', granted it was pretty damn obvious that Hulk was going to be brought back to Earth by a storyline at some point, but to have a damaged warp-engine (placed by rebels as stated in ''WorldWarHulk'' ''ComicBook/WorldWarHulk'' though supposed ally Miek allowed them to do so) explode and effectively destroy everything he had spent a good portion of the novel building towards, a wife, future child, kingdom, peace and acceptance as a respected and admired being in the last few pages seems to fit this trope to a T.


* Many of the stories in WillEisner's ''Contract with God'' trilogy are of this type.

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* Many of the stories in WillEisner's Creator/WillEisner's ''Contract with God'' trilogy are of this type.

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