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'''Original air date:''' May 22, 1989

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* BrokenAesop: Riker's insistence of being in control of his own genetics and his uncriticized destruction of his clone made without his consent are a poor attempt at being anti-cloning from a secular perspective. The thing is, cloning, in real life, doesn't work anywhere to close to how it's depicted, and even ''IF'' a clone could be produced as an adult[[note]]IT CAN'T[[/note]], genes are not the only factor in an individual's personality. So while his clones would no doubt look the same, they'd likely have their own take on things, keeping Riker "unique".


* SpaceAmish: The Bringloidi are Space Rural Irish, having been founded on a philosophy of returning to an agrarian lifestyle. That said, they seem to follow that philosophy only by default, since they have no antipathy toward advanced technology and nor qualms about returning to a high-tech lifestyle.

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* SpaceAmish: The Bringloidi are Space Rural Irish, having been founded on a philosophy of returning to an agrarian lifestyle. That said, they seem to follow that philosophy only by default, since they have no antipathy toward advanced technology and nor qualms about returning to a high-tech lifestyle.


Upon arrival, the ship discovers that solar flares from the planet's sun are threatening the colony, so they decide to evacuate the inhabitants, the Bringloidi to the ship. To the crew's dismay, the Bringloidi turn out to be [[{{Oireland}} ridiculously stereotypical Irish farmers]]. Picard and Riker meet their cheerful, folksy leader, Danilo OíDell and his beautiful, feisty daughter Brenna. As the crew struggles to contain the Bringloidi's attempts to convert the cargo hold into a makeshift farm, and Riker puts the moves on Brenna, Picard learns from Danilo of a second lost colony that was also founded by their old ship.

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Upon arrival, the ship discovers that solar flares from the planet's sun are threatening the colony, so they decide to evacuate the inhabitants, the Bringloidi Bringloidi, to the ship. To the crew's dismay, the Bringloidi turn out to be [[{{Oireland}} ridiculously stereotypical Irish farmers]]. Picard and Riker meet their cheerful, folksy leader, Danilo OíDell and his beautiful, feisty daughter Brenna. As the The crew struggles to contain the Bringloidi's attempts to convert the cargo hold into a makeshift farm, and Riker puts the moves on Brenna, while Picard learns from Danilo of a second lost colony that was also founded by their old ship.


* LivingLieDetector: Geordi's VISOR allows him to view heart rates and breathing patterns, by which he can tell when people are lying to him. Perhaps in an attempt to cover up any plot holes this revelation might open up, he says it only works on humans. Even still, it never comes up again.

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* LivingLieDetector: Geordi's VISOR [[NewPowersAsThePlotDemands suddenly allows him him]] to view heart rates and breathing patterns, by which he can tell when people are lying to him. Perhaps in an attempt to cover up any plot holes this revelation might open up, he says it only works on humans. Even still, it This power never comes up again.


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* NewPowersAsThePlotDemands: Geordi needs to figure out that Riker and Pulaski were kidnapped, so he suddenly gains the ability to [[LivingLieDetector detect lies]] through his VISOR. This ability never comes up again, likely because it would cut into Troi's abilities to sense deception.


* LowCultureHighTech: Granger is clearly concerned about how to get the Bringloidi to adapt to a 24th century society with an early 19th century understanding of technology.

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* LowCultureHighTech: Granger is clearly concerned about how to get the Bringloidi to adapt to a 24th century society with an early a 19th century understanding of technology.

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* FieryRedhead: Brenna's hair is on the auburn side, but red enough to fit the Irish stereotype of the flame-haired, hard-nosed, sexually aggressive Irish lass.


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* LargeHam: Danilo O'Dell is a character broad enough for vaudeville. Just watch him cross his eyes after a gulp of that GargleBlaster.

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* TakeAThirdOption: Picard faces the choice of allowing the Mariposans to keep their civilization viable for a dozen more generations via cloning or allow them to die out. He takes a third option by encouraging the Bringloidi to settle in Mariposa and reinstitute sexual procreation, which will sustain Mariposa indefinitely.

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* MoodWhiplash: In the middle of BreatherEpisode largely devoted to drunken Irish hijinks and [[BareYourMidriff bare midriffs]], Riker performs what is, at best, a summary abortion, and at worst, outright murder.


* OldTimeyAnkleTaboo: In one scene, Riker is having a conversation with one of the women from the colony and she lifts up her skirt to show her ankles, indicating she wants a relationship with him.

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* OldTimeyAnkleTaboo: In one scene, Brenna seduces Riker is having a conversation with one of the women from the colony by showing him her ankles and asking him where she lifts up can wash her skirt to show feet. It takes her ankles, indicating she wants a relationship with him.few times before he understands that it's a direct proposition.



* SpaceAmish: The Bringloidi are Space Rural Irish, complete with whiskey stills.

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* SpaceAmish: The Bringloidi are Space Rural Irish, complete with whiskey stills.having been founded on a philosophy of returning to an agrarian lifestyle. That said, they seem to follow that philosophy only by default, since they have no antipathy toward advanced technology and nor qualms about returning to a high-tech lifestyle.



* WorfHadTheFlu: He really did, even though it didn't affect the plot.


Picard calls Riker into his ready room and plays a beacon thatís been transmitting from deep in space for a month. They agree that it sounds like an SOS code, but itís a Terran code that hasnít been used in centuries. Upon leaving the ready room, Picard finds Worf collapsed, and Data calling for Doctor Pulaski. But donít worry; this cliffhanger is irrelevant to the episodeís plot. Worf just has the Klingon measles, and Pulaski gets him in shape in no time.

The crew discovers the planet where the beacon came from, and finds that its sun is undergoing ominous solar flares. Itís quickly decided that they must evacuate the planet, but they arenít quite prepared for the inhabitantsí insistence on bringing their livestock along. The colonists, called the Bringloidi, have given up much of their technology and are now farmers who somehow fit [[{{Oireland}} every offensive Irish stereotype in the book]] despite having left Earth centuries ago. This is especially true of their cheerful, folksy leader, Danilo OíDell. Picard sets the colonists up in one of the cargo holds, which they quickly turn into a makeshift farm, with chicken coops and homemade stills in every corner and straw all over the floor. The silliness of the situation [[ActuallyPrettyFunny even gets a laugh out of Picard,]] although Riker is too busy flirting with OíDellís daughter Brenna to appreciate it. But either way, the colonists are safely aboard and itís a short trip to the nearest starbase, so everything seems to be going swell, until OíDell asks if Picard has heard anything from the other colony.

They find the second colony easily enough and make contact with its prime minister, Wilson Granger, who invites them down for a visit, but Troi cautions that thereís something heís not telling them. Riker, Worf, and Pulaski beam down to the colony, which is much more technologically advanced than the Bringloidi society, and they notice quickly that everyone they encounter looks alike. Pulaski guesses easily enough that their entire population is made up of clones, and Granger confirms it. He explains that only five of the original colonists survived, and cloning was the only way for the colony to continue, but they are deteriorating with each generation, which means they need new genes to introduce into the gene pool in order to survive. Granger asks for tissue samples from the ''Enterprise'' crew to create new clones from, but Riker shoots the idea down with prejudice. He says people preserve their legacy by having children, not by cloning themselves, which is pretty much just rubbing salt in the wound since the entire reason these guys need help is because they canít do that. Picard decides for everyone on the ship that they all agree with Riker, but he does order a repair crew down to the planet to fix their equipment. Somehow, it doesnít occur to him that heís almost begging for the colonists to kidnap them and clone them without their consent. And wouldnít you know it, as soon as they get Riker and Pulaski alone, thatís exactly what they do.

The two of them return to the ''Enterprise'' with no memory of what happened, but they piece it together when Geordi asks them where they disappeared to, claiming that he could tell the clones were lying about their whereabouts with his VISOR (a talent never mentioned before or since). They beam back to the lab and destroy their clones, unconcerned with the fact that itís technically murder, but it does get them thinking that maybe they should do more for these guys than just wishing them luck. Pulaski far too belatedly points out that even adding new clones to the mix wouldnít save them for long; what they really need is to breed with other humans. And as it happens the ''Enterprise'' has a whole cargo bay full of humans to offer them.

Now, they do at least address how unreasonable it is to decide other peopleís breeding choices for them, but after a session of negotiations Picard does manage to convince both parties that itís in their best interests. Pulaski tells them that the best way to get the gene pool to a sustainable size is for each female to breed with three different males, which strikes OíDell just fine, and even his daughter warms to the idea once she takes a shine to Prime Minister Granger.

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Picard calls Riker into his ready room and plays a beacon thatís that's been transmitting from deep in space for a month. They agree that it sounds like an SOS code, but itís a Terran code that hasnít been used in centuries. Upon leaving Data discovers that the ready room, Picard finds code comes from the planet Bringloid V, home to a colony founded on the philosophy of returning to a pre-industrial way of living. On the way there, Worf collapsed, and Data calling for Doctor Pulaski. But donít worry; this cliffhanger is irrelevant to the episodeís plot. Worf just has the Klingon measles, briefly falls ill, and Pulaski gets him in shape in no time.

The crew
covers for him, earning his thanks.

Upon arrival, the ship
discovers the planet where the beacon came from, and finds that its sun is undergoing ominous solar flares. Itís quickly decided that flares from the planet's sun are threatening the colony, so they must decide to evacuate the planet, but they arenít quite prepared for inhabitants, the inhabitantsí insistence on bringing their livestock along. The colonists, called Bringloidi to the Bringloidi, have given up much of their technology and are now farmers who somehow fit ship. To the crew's dismay, the Bringloidi turn out to be [[{{Oireland}} every offensive ridiculously stereotypical Irish stereotype in the book]] despite having left Earth centuries ago. This is especially true of farmers]]. Picard and Riker meet their cheerful, folksy leader, Danilo OíDell. Picard sets OíDell and his beautiful, feisty daughter Brenna. As the colonists up in one of crew struggles to contain the Bringloidi's attempts to convert the cargo holds, which they quickly turn hold into a makeshift farm, with chicken coops and homemade stills in every corner and straw all over the floor. The silliness of the situation [[ActuallyPrettyFunny even gets a laugh out of Picard,]] although Riker is too busy flirting with OíDellís daughter Brenna to appreciate it. But either way, puts the colonists are safely aboard and itís a short trip to the nearest starbase, so everything seems to be going swell, until OíDell asks if moves on Brenna, Picard has heard anything learns from the other colony.

Danilo of a second lost colony that was also founded by their old ship.

They find the second colony colony, Mariposa, easily enough and make contact with its prime minister, Wilson Granger, who invites them down for a visit, but Troi cautions that thereís something heís not telling them. Riker, Worf, and Pulaski beam down to the colony, which is much more technologically advanced than the Bringloidi society, and they notice quickly that everyone they encounter looks alike. Pulaski guesses easily enough deduces that their entire population is made up of clones, and Granger confirms it. He explains that only five of the original colonists survived, and cloning was the only way for the colony to continue, but they are deteriorating with each generation, which means they need new genes to introduce into CloneDegeneration will wipe them out within the gene pool in order to survive. Granger next few generations. He asks for tissue samples from the ''Enterprise'' bridge crew to create new clones from, but Riker shoots the idea down with prejudice. He says people preserve for their legacy by having children, not by cloning themselves, which is pretty much just rubbing salt in the wound since the entire reason these guys need help is because they canít do that. genetic material to renew their clone stock, but Picard decides for everyone on the ship states that they all no one onboard would agree with Riker, but he does order to such a thing. Instead, they agree only to repair crew down to the planet to fix some of their equipment. Somehow, it doesnít occur to him that heís almost begging for the colonists to kidnap them and clone them without their consent. And wouldnít you know it, as soon as they get equipment before moving on.

The Mariposans kidap
Riker and Pulaski alone, thatís exactly what they do.

The two of
and steal their genes, leaving them return to the ''Enterprise'' with no memory of what happened, memory, but they piece it together when Granger claims to have not seen them, Geordi asks them where they disappeared to, claiming that he could tell picks up on the clones were lying about their whereabouts with lie using his VISOR (a talent never mentioned before or since). They VISOR, and the truth quickly comes out. Riker, Pulaski and Geordi beam back to the lab down and destroy their clones, unconcerned with the fact that itís technically murder, but it does get them thinking that maybe they should do more for these guys than just wishing them luck. Pulaski far too belatedly points out that even adding new clones to the mix wouldnít save them for long; what they really need is to breed with other humans. And as it happens the ''Enterprise'' has a whole cargo bay full of humans to offer them.

Now, they do at least address how unreasonable it is to decide other peopleís breeding choices for
already being made from their genes. Granger confronts them, but after a session of negotiations Picard does manage to convince both parties that itís in their best interests. Pulaski tells them arguing that the best way Mariposans have a right to get the gene pool avoid annihilation. Picard is now stuck with two problems: a wild and rustic group of settlers with no home, and an advanced civilization in desperate need of fresh blood. It doesn't take a genius to a sustainable size is for realize that these problems solve each female other.

Picard organizes a sit-down between Danilo and Granger. They instantly hate each other and point out all the problems that trying
to breed coexist with three different males, which strikes OíDell each other will entail. But once Danilo discovers just fine, and even his daughter how much screwing will be required to rejuvenate Mariposa, he warms to the idea. The Mariposans have foresworn all sexual interest and find the idea once repugnant, but Danilo assures Granger that nature will take its course. The two sides agree to join forces. Finally, Picard convinces Brenna to provide her leadership to the new society, and she takes quickly decides that Granger, a shine to Prime Minister Granger.man of importance, will be one of her husbands.



* AnachronismStew: {{Lampshaded}} InUniverse re the Bringloidi, not just in their ancestors' time but especially on the ''Enterprise'', and then among the Mariposans.



** Cloning Riker wouldn't make an exact copy of him, only a person with identical physical traits.

to:

** Cloning Riker wouldn't make an exact copy of him, only a person with identical physical traits.genetics.
** Real clones don't look perfectly identical, just as "identical" twins don't actually look exactly alike. Only some of the background Mariposans are played by real twins who only look somewhat similar to each other. Others are played by the same actor.



* BareYourMidriff: Brenna O'Dell, when she is advancing on Riker.

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* BaitAndSwitch: Picard is getting frustrated by the Bringloidi's antics. When it seems he's finally had enough, he turns away and steadies himself. But when he turns back around, he's [[ActuallyPrettyFunny actually laughing]]. Riker expresses surprise at his attitude, and Picard says that sometimes, you just have to laugh at the absurdity of it all.
* BareYourMidriff: Brenna O'Dell, when she is advancing on Riker.wears a midriff-baring top through most of the episode.



* BreatherEpisode: The stakes are pretty low in this episode, and most of it is dedicated to some ''very'' broad humor.



* DidntThinkThisThrough: The Bringloidi have a shallow and mistaken understanding of Dr. Pulaski's polygamy plan: They don't realize ''polyamory'' will also be required. Both O'Dells are all agog at the prospect of having three "spouses" -- what they don't realize is each "spouse" will need to breed with two other people in addition to them. The episode wraps up so quickly that it's not clear if the ''Enterprise'' crew, or the creators, realized this either.



* GargleBlaster: Worf introduces the Bringloidi to a ''very'' potent Klingon potable.

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* GargleBlaster: When Danilo turns his nose at the replicator's attempt at whisky, Worf introduces the Bringloidi to gives him a ''very'' potent Klingon potable.potable, which leaves him nearly speechless.



* LivingLieDetector: Geordi's VISOR allows him to view heart rates and breathing patterns, by which he can tell when people are lying to him. As to how he was so easily taken in by the Pakleds in [[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E17SamaritanSnare the previous episode]], he claims that he's only trained himself to detect lies from humans.
* LowCultureHighTech: Something else the Mariposans have to dread, given that they are a technologically advanced civilization about to be overrun by an influx of SpaceAmish. Prime Minister Granger looks rather mortified upon seeing the Bringloidi encampment in the ''Enterprise'' cargo bay.
* MoralMyopia:
** Cloning someone without their consent is a huge crime. Forcing a group of traditional monogamous rural people and another group physically repulsed at the idea of sex, neither of which you have any legal authority over, to form a new polygamous culture by threatening to steal the technology they depend on to survive is apparently a laudable deed.
** Also, killing a potentially sentient being because it had been made without your consent. Albeit plenty of people would agree, with the closest real-world equivalent being the choice of the DNA donors.
* {{Oireland}}: Even though the Bringloidi left the Earth in the 22nd century and have been living on their new planet for a couple of hundred years, their appearance, language, and behavior fits the 20th century stereotype of the rural Irish, including UsefulNotes/IrishTravellers. This is somewhat justified, since the Bringloidi are the descendants of a movement that set out to build a SpaceAmish utopia on another planet, though it remains unclear why said utopia is based on historical Irish clichés.

to:

* LivingLieDetector: Geordi's VISOR allows him to view heart rates and breathing patterns, by which he can tell when people are lying to him. As Perhaps in an attempt to how cover up any plot holes this revelation might open up, he was so easily taken in by the Pakleds in [[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E17SamaritanSnare the previous episode]], he claims that he's says it only trained himself to detect lies from humans.
works on humans. Even still, it never comes up again.
* LowCultureHighTech: Something else the Mariposans have to dread, given that they are a technologically advanced civilization about to be overrun by an influx of SpaceAmish. Prime Minister Granger looks rather mortified upon seeing is clearly concerned about how to get the Bringloidi encampment in the ''Enterprise'' cargo bay.
* MoralMyopia:
** Cloning someone without their consent is a huge crime. Forcing a group of traditional monogamous rural people and another group physically repulsed at the idea of sex, neither of which you have any legal authority over,
to form a new polygamous culture by threatening adapt to steal the technology they depend on to survive is apparently a laudable deed.
** Also, killing a potentially sentient being because it had been made without your consent. Albeit plenty of people would agree,
24th century society with the closest real-world equivalent being the choice an early 19th century understanding of the DNA donors.
technology.
* {{Oireland}}: Even though the The Bringloidi left the descend from Earth in Irish, and apparently only the 22nd stereotypes of 19th and 20th century and have been living on their new planet for a couple of hundred years, their Irish survived the years. Their appearance, language, and behavior fits the 20th century stereotype stereotypical model of the rural Irish, including UsefulNotes/IrishTravellers. This is somewhat justified, since lusty, daffy, drunken and rowdy Irishman as well as the Bringloidi are the descendants of a movement that set out to build a SpaceAmish utopia on another planet, though it remains unclear why said utopia is based on historical Irish clichés.beautiful, FieryRedhead Irishwoman.



* ShoutOut:
** The list of deep space launches between 2123 and 2190 seen on Picard's desktop monitor includes references to ''Franchise/StarWars'' Episode IV: ''Film/ANewHope'', ''Film/TheAdventuresOfBuckarooBanzaiAcrossTheEighthDimension'', and ''Anime/UruseiYatsura''.
** The Bringloidi half of the plot is reminiscent of ''Film/OperationPetticoat'', with the crew dealing with an increasingly ludicrous situation aboard ship to the point where TheCaptain himself is forced to bow to the absurdity of it all.

to:

* ShoutOut:
**
ShoutOut: The list of deep space launches between 2123 and 2190 seen on Picard's desktop monitor includes references to ''Franchise/StarWars'' Episode IV: ''Film/ANewHope'', ''Film/TheAdventuresOfBuckarooBanzaiAcrossTheEighthDimension'', and ''Anime/UruseiYatsura''.
** The Bringloidi half of the plot is reminiscent of ''Film/OperationPetticoat'', with the crew dealing with an increasingly ludicrous situation aboard ship to the point where TheCaptain himself is forced to bow to the absurdity of it all.
''Anime/UruseiYatsura''.



* SpaceWhaleAesop: Riker's killing of his not yet fully-developed clone was actually intended as a pro-choice message by writer Melinda Snodgrass and showrunner Maurice Hurley. However, the way it's handled--Riker casually kills the clone, later comments that he did it because "one Riker is unique," then the matter is never brought up again--completely obscures the intended message, and even with the necessary leaps in logic could actually be interpreted to mean that abortion should only be legal in the case of rape victims. It's an Aesop that has aged poorly, because pro-choice arguments thirty years on largely focus on the iniquity of requiring a woman to allow another creature to inhabit her living body against her will, and sometimes even claim that if pregnancy could be ended safely without harm to the fetus then that would be preferred. The idea that you should be able to destroy your own offspring, even were it able to exist without harm to you, isn't a factor in the discussion.

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* PlotHole: The Bringloidi have no advanced technology on their planet; Data states that there is no evidence of an advanced communications network, and Worf says there is no artificial power source operating on the planet. Despite this, they were somehow able, not only to learn that the Bringloid sun's flare activity was about to kill them, but to send a distress signal powerful -- and ''[[SubspaceAnsible fast]]'' -- enough to be picked up in another star system and summon help in time. This is never explained.


[[caption-width-right:350:O'Brien beams up the Bringloidi, and probably dies a little inside.]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:O'Brien beams up the Bringloidi, and probably Creator/ColmMeaney dies a little inside.]]

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* DidntThinkThisThrough: The Bringloidi have a shallow and mistaken understanding of Dr. Pulaski's polygamy plan: They don't realize ''polyamory'' will also be required. Both O'Dells are all agog at the prospect of having three "spouses" -- what they don't realize is each "spouse" will need to breed with two other people in addition to them. The episode wraps up so quickly that it's not clear if the ''Enterprise'' crew, or the creators, realized this either.


** Even with the two colonies combined the population is too small to be genetically viable. The Bringloidi colony's numbers are explicitly stated to be 223 (plus two who are still in the womb). While the Mariposans are more numerous in terms of individuals, genetically speaking there are only five of them. Most estimates put the minimum starting numbers for a permanent population in the thousands, unless breeding is ''very'' strictly controlled. Presumably by agreeing to take in the Bringloidi refugees, the Mariposans would find Starfleet more disposed to help them with things like using their technology to help with preventing genetic deterioration and offering other settlers to further diversify the gene pool.

to:

** Even with the two colonies combined combined, the population is too small to be genetically viable. The Bringloidi colony's numbers are explicitly stated to be 223 (plus two who are still in the womb). While the Mariposans are more numerous in terms of individuals, genetically speaking there are only five of them. Most estimates put the minimum starting numbers for a permanent population in the thousands, unless breeding is ''very'' strictly controlled. Presumably by agreeing to take in the Bringloidi refugees, the Mariposans would find Starfleet more disposed to help them with things like using their technology to help with preventing genetic deterioration and offering other settlers to further diversify the gene pool.



* CloneDegeneration: The Mariposans have this problem, as a civilization of clones made from previous generations of clones. Genetically speaking there are only five of them.

to:

* CloneDegeneration: The Mariposans have this problem, as a civilization of clones made from previous generations of clones. Genetically speaking speaking, there are only five of them.



** Also, killing a potentially sentient being because it had been made without your consent. Albeit, plenty of people would agree, with the closest real-world equivalent being the choice of the DNA donors.
* {{Oireland}}: Even though the Bringloidi left the Earth in the 22nd century, and have been living on their new planet for a couple of hundred years, their appearance, language, and behavior fits the 20th century stereotype of the rural Irish, including UsefulNotes/IrishTravellers. This is somewhat justified, since the Bringloidi are the descendants of a movement that set out to build a SpaceAmish utopia on another planet, though it remains unclear why said utopia is based on historical Irish clichés.

to:

** Also, killing a potentially sentient being because it had been made without your consent. Albeit, Albeit plenty of people would agree, with the closest real-world equivalent being the choice of the DNA donors.
* {{Oireland}}: Even though the Bringloidi left the Earth in the 22nd century, century and have been living on their new planet for a couple of hundred years, their appearance, language, and behavior fits the 20th century stereotype of the rural Irish, including UsefulNotes/IrishTravellers. This is somewhat justified, since the Bringloidi are the descendants of a movement that set out to build a SpaceAmish utopia on another planet, though it remains unclear why said utopia is based on historical Irish clichés.



* SpaceWhaleAesop: Riker's killing of his not yet fully-developed clone was actually intended as a pro-choice message by writer Melinda Snodgrass and showrunner Maurice Hurley. However, the way it's handled--Riker casually kills the clone, later comments that he did it because "one Riker is unique," then the matter is never brought up again--completely obscures the intended message, and even with the necessary leaps in logic could actually be interpreted to mean that abortion should only be legal in the case of rape victims. It's an Aesop that has aged poorly, because pro-choice arguments thirty years on largely focus on the iniquity of requiring a woman to allow another creature to inhabit her living body against her will, and sometimes even claim that if pregnancy could be ended safely without harm to the fetus then that would be preferred. The idea that you should be able to destroy your own offspring, were it able to exist without harm to you, isn't a factor in the discussion.

to:

* SpaceWhaleAesop: Riker's killing of his not yet fully-developed clone was actually intended as a pro-choice message by writer Melinda Snodgrass and showrunner Maurice Hurley. However, the way it's handled--Riker casually kills the clone, later comments that he did it because "one Riker is unique," then the matter is never brought up again--completely obscures the intended message, and even with the necessary leaps in logic could actually be interpreted to mean that abortion should only be legal in the case of rape victims. It's an Aesop that has aged poorly, because pro-choice arguments thirty years on largely focus on the iniquity of requiring a woman to allow another creature to inhabit her living body against her will, and sometimes even claim that if pregnancy could be ended safely without harm to the fetus then that would be preferred. The idea that you should be able to destroy your own offspring, even were it able to exist without harm to you, isn't a factor in the discussion.

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