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** Apparently, the Heir of Slytherin at the time, Corvinus Gaunt, managed to interfere with the project enough to protect the original trapdoor and transfer its hidden-language wards to one of the sinks, which raises the question of how a teenager was able to do this, much less without anyone noticing, much less a member of [[RoyallyScrewedUp the notoriously inbred and violent Gaunt family]]. And if Gaunt could do all this, it seems like it'd be a lot easier to just block up the original passage and make a new entrance elsewhere. A girl's bathroom sink isn't what you'd call a convenient place for your hiding spot.

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** Apparently, the Heir of Slytherin at the time, Corvinus Gaunt, managed to interfere with the project enough to protect the original trapdoor and transfer its hidden-language wards to one of the sinks, which raises the question of how a teenager was able to do this, much less without anyone noticing, much less a member of [[RoyallyScrewedUp the notoriously inbred and violent Gaunt family]]. And if Gaunt could do all this, it seems like it'd be a lot easier to just block up the original passage and make a new entrance elsewhere. A girl's bathroom sink isn't what you'd call a convenient place for your hiding spot. For that matter, why didn’t Gaunt open the Chamber himself, if he knew where it was and how to do so, and wanted to purge Muggle-borns from the school?


* ''VideoGame/AsheronsCall'' attempted to make an in-universe explanation for why monsters respawn: They are actually teleporting in through portals that Asheron's spell (the titular "call") opened on their respective homeworlds. While this might make sense for {{Mooks}} and random animals, it falls completely flat in explaining why named/unique [=NPCs=] respawn (unless we are meant to assume they have an endless supply of [[ExpendableClone expendable clones]] they keep sending through when they die for some reason). Later [[FlipFlopOfGod it was said]] that unique [=NPCs=] actually respawned due to lifestones (In game devices used to set your respawn point), while this might make sense for intelligent creatures, it still doesn't explain how unique animals and the like can respawn, not to mention the obvious problem that in most cases theres clearly no lifestone nearby. Really, this is one of those game mechanics that should have just gone unexplained.

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* ''VideoGame/AsheronsCall'' attempted to make an in-universe explanation for why monsters respawn: They are actually teleporting in through portals that Asheron's spell (the titular "call") opened on their respective homeworlds. While this might make sense for {{Mooks}} and random animals, it falls completely flat in explaining why named/unique [=NPCs=] respawn (unless we are meant to assume they have an endless supply of [[ExpendableClone expendable clones]] they keep sending through when they die for some reason). Later [[FlipFlopOfGod it was said]] that unique [=NPCs=] actually respawned due to lifestones (In game devices used to set your respawn point), while this might make sense for intelligent creatures, it still doesn't explain how unique animals and the like can respawn, not to mention the obvious problem that in most cases theres clearly no lifestone nearby. Also, neither "version" of this explanation accounts for why certain creatures only "portal in" to certain locations (such as high level monsters only appearing in the games designated high level areas, even though the portals would have no way of "knowing" how to assign creatures to the right area based on their power) Really, this is one of those game mechanics that should have just gone unexplained.

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** The main game introduced "Legendary Weapons", special variants of the normal weapons wielded by the player which were previously utilized by the characters in the film, and differ from said weapons with unique aspects (i.e. Hudson's Pulse Rifle can carry 99 rounds instead of the standard 30). However, this raises several problems once the player catches on that the majority of the weapons were ''destroyed'' in the film -- Ripley's Pulse Rifle, Frost's Flamethrower and Vasquez's Smartgun were all inside the alien hive in Hadley's Hope when the atmospheric plant exploded, and would have been vaporized regardless, while Gorman's and Vasquez's Pistols were destroyed when they detonated a grenade in the tunnels near the Medical Wing. In gameplay, you can find these weapons in random spots, including tucked inside a cargo container (Vasquez's Smartgun), on the Sulaco (Hicks' Shotgun) or other undamaged locations. More notably, the Legendary Weapons all require special ammo to use, even though they are functionally identical to the normal weapons and shouldn't have any problems drawing from the same ammo pool.

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** There is a spell called "Tasha's Hideous Laughter" that [[LaughingMad causes the target to start laughing so hard they can't fight.]] If the caster is a differnt creature type than the target (e.g a humanoid casting it on a dragon) the target gets a bonus to it's save because the humor supposedly doesn't "translate well". The problem being that, most cases of LostInTranslation (in real life, at least) are due to two languages being too differnt to conveigh the full meaning or relying on a {{Pun}} that doesn't work in target language due to the words being too different. There's no reason to think if both creatures speak the same language, they would be unable to understand each other. The implication may be that [[YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm some monsters mind's are just too alien to understand human humor,]] but if that's the case, you'd think the spell wouldn't work at all on them.


* The third-party adventure "World's Largest Dungeon" falls into this a lot.
** It proudly advertises having every monster in the game, with the ExcusePlot of taking place in a massive underground prison complex built by celestials. Nonetheless, it ends up badly stretching that logic to deliver on its promise, which is nowhere more obvious than with its pseudodragon encounter: a NeutralGood creature that celestials would want to leave alone and that wouldn't make much of a prison guard. The book claims that the pseudodragon ended up there by mistake, as the celestials thought it was a baby red dragon. But while that very mistake is common for novice adventurers (it's basically the reason pseudodragons exist), it makes no sense for someone any more knowledgeable about dragons--among other things, a wyrmling red dragon is about the size of a St. Bernard, while a pseudodragon is a ShoulderSizedDragon. This isn't even mentioning that they're intelligent and capable of telepathic speech, so the pseudodragon should be able to point this out and ask to be released, and a simple Detect Evil spell (which nearly any celestial can cast) would verify it was telling the truth. So either the celestials running the dungeon are complete morons, or they're such paranoid jerks that they locked up the dragon anyway. This is especially ''JustForFun/{{Egregious}}'' considering most pseudodragons are purple or maroon and not red, which, combined with the size difference, makes it seem like the celestials had a massive case of in-universe CriticalResearchFailure when they made the dungeon.
** The explanation for the many deadly traps in the dungeon is that they were put there to keep the original prisoners contained. Fair enough--except that the prisoners are demons, devils, and undead, and many of the traps involve the use of poison. All three of these creature types are immune to poison. Furthermore, many regions make use of unbreakable walls of force (in a dungeon where teleport magic doesn't work). Why not dispense with the traps and just put up more walls?
** A xill wizard character has the motivation that he's taken his army inside the dungeon in the hopes of freeing a pit fiend, who can use its wish-granting ability to help the xill find the location of a SealedEvilInACan. But why would a rather powerful wizard looking for a wish invade a notoriously inescapable dungeon, instead of just shelling out the money for a luck blade or a wish scroll? And why would he want to free a pit fiend for his wish, a creature that would be a JackassGenie at best, assuming it didn't just kill him? The pit fiend isn't even the only thing in the dungeon capable of casting Wish, so why not just bully one of the efreeti into line? It would be much easier to just say he was there to free the SealedEvilInACan because it was in the dungeon to begin with.



* The third-party adventure "World's Largest Dungeon" falls into this a lot.
** It proudly advertises having every monster in the game, with the ExcusePlot of taking place in a massive underground prison complex built by celestials. Nonetheless, it ends up badly stretching that logic to deliver on its promise, which is nowhere more obvious than with its pseudodragon encounter: a NeutralGood creature that celestials would want to leave alone and that wouldn't make much of a prison guard. The book claims that the pseudodragon ended up there by mistake, as the celestials thought it was a baby red dragon. But while that very mistake is common for novice adventurers (it's basically the reason pseudodragons exist), it makes no sense for someone any more knowledgeable about dragons--among other things, a wyrmling red dragon is about the size of a St. Bernard, while a pseudodragon is a ShoulderSizedDragon. This isn't even mentioning that they're intelligent and capable of telepathic speech, so the pseudodragon should be able to point this out and ask to be released, and a simple Detect Evil spell (which nearly any celestial can cast) would verify it was telling the truth. So either the celestials running the dungeon are complete morons, or they're such paranoid jerks that they locked up the dragon anyway. This is especially ''JustForFun/{{Egregious}}'' considering most pseudodragons are purple or maroon and not red, which, combined with the size difference, makes it seem like the celestials had a massive case of in-universe CriticalResearchFailure when they made the dungeon.
** The explanation for the many deadly traps in the dungeon is that they were put there to keep the original prisoners contained. Fair enough--except that the prisoners are demons, devils, and undead, and many of the traps involve the use of poison. All three of these creature types are immune to poison. Furthermore, many regions make use of unbreakable walls of force (in a dungeon where teleport magic doesn't work). Why not dispense with the traps and just put up more walls?
** A xill wizard character has the motivation that he's taken his army inside the dungeon in the hopes of freeing a pit fiend, who can use its wish-granting ability to help the xill find the location of a SealedEvilInACan. But why would a rather powerful wizard looking for a wish invade a notoriously inescapable dungeon, instead of just shelling out the money for a luck blade or a wish scroll? And why would he want to free a pit fiend for his wish, a creature that would be a JackassGenie at best, assuming it didn't just kill him? The pit fiend isn't even the only thing in the dungeon capable of casting Wish, so why not just bully one of the efreeti into line? It would be much easier to just say he was there to free the SealedEvilInACan because it was in the dungeon to begin with.


** In the fourth movie, Richard Nixon's head (through Fry's mind reading) admits that the one thing they never figured out was that they really ''did'' fake the m
Moon landing -- on Venus!

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** In the fourth movie, Richard Nixon's head (through Fry's mind reading) admits that the one thing they never figured out was that they really ''did'' fake the m
Moon landing -- on Venus!


** In the first game, Covenant weapons like the Plasma Rifle and Plasma Pistol didn't use traditional ammo systems and instead had more of a battery that they used that, when overused, would make them no longer function. In game it was never really explained why the weapons became unusable but the early novels said that the reason why in game the weapons were essentially thrown away after use was because humanity lacked knowledge of the Covenants weapons to understand how they work and how to get them to essentially "reload", compared to weapons like the Needler which is more ammo focused. While this explains why in the first game you would stop using them, games after the first never address this at all. For example, ''VideoGame/Halo2'' and ''VideoGame/Halo3'' allow you to play as the Arbiter, who, as a member of the Covenant, would logically know how they work and should be able to avert them not working properly, but instead the weapons fuction like they did in the first game. Its a hole in the story that never gets elaborated on.
** In the first game, the enemies all had names that were designed to make it easy to tell what their role was. Grunts were TheGoomba, Elites were a {{Elite Mook|s}}, Jackals were less named for their combat role but their appearance and laugh, and the Hunter was a BossInMookClothes. It was justified in game by the fact that these names were what humanity called the Covenant, but in ''VideoGame/Halo2'', the Covenant say these names like its what they actually are. Later lore would provide names to the races of the Covenant, but its something that doesn't make sense at all and never gets addressed. The Jackals are especially odd, as why would an alien empire name one of their units after and Earth animal.

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** In the first game, Covenant weapons like the Plasma Rifle and Plasma Pistol didn't use traditional ammo systems and instead had more of a battery that they used that, when overused, would make them no longer function. In game it was never really explained why the weapons became unusable but the early novels said that the reason why in game the weapons were essentially thrown away after use was because humanity lacked knowledge of the Covenants weapons to understand how they work and how to get them to essentially "reload", compared to weapons like the Needler which is more ammo focused. While this explains why in the first game you would stop using them, games after the first never address this at all. For example, ''VideoGame/Halo2'' and ''VideoGame/Halo3'' allow you to play as the Arbiter, who, as a member of the Covenant, would logically know how they work and should be able to avert them not working properly, but instead the weapons fuction function like they did in the first game. Its a hole in the story that never gets elaborated on.
on and seems to have been forgotten entirely.
** In the first game, the enemies all had names that were designed to make it easy to tell what their role was. Grunts were TheGoomba, Elites were a {{Elite Mook|s}}, Jackals were less named for their combat role but their appearance and laugh, and the Hunter was a BossInMookClothes. It was justified in game by the fact that these names were what humanity called the Covenant, but in ''VideoGame/Halo2'', the Covenant say these names like its what they actually are. Later lore would provide names to the races of the Covenant, but its something that doesn't make sense at all and never gets addressed. The Jackals are especially odd, as why would an alien empire name one of their units after and an Earth animal.animal, especially when for all intense and purposes, they know so little of Earth before the Human-Covenant War?


** In the first game, the enemies all had names that were designed to make it easy to tell what their role was. Grunts were TheGoomba, Elites were a {{Elite Mook|s}}, Jackals were less named for their combat role but their appearance and laugh, and the Hunter was a BossInMookClothes. It was justified in game by the fact that these names were what humanity called the Covenant, but in ''VideoGame/Halo2'', the Covenant say these names like its what they actually are. Later lore would provide names to the races of the Covenant, but its something that doesn't make sense at all and never gets addressed.

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** In the first game, the enemies all had names that were designed to make it easy to tell what their role was. Grunts were TheGoomba, Elites were a {{Elite Mook|s}}, Jackals were less named for their combat role but their appearance and laugh, and the Hunter was a BossInMookClothes. It was justified in game by the fact that these names were what humanity called the Covenant, but in ''VideoGame/Halo2'', the Covenant say these names like its what they actually are. Later lore would provide names to the races of the Covenant, but its something that doesn't make sense at all and never gets addressed. The Jackals are especially odd, as why would an alien empire name one of their units after and Earth animal.


* ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaDawnOfSorrow'' claims that the castle the game takes place in is an exact replica of the {{Trope Namer|s}} for ChaosArchitecture for the purpose of avoiding an ArtifactTitle (the game doesn't take place in Dracula's Castle, AKA Castlevania), which would merely be trivia otherwise.

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* ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaDawnOfSorrow'' claims that the castle the game takes place in is an exact replica of the {{Trope Namer|s}} for ChaosArchitecture for the purpose of avoiding an ArtifactTitle (the game doesn't take place in Dracula's Castle, AKA Castlevania), which would merely be trivia otherwise. "Exact replica" could also mean that it works in the same way as Dracula's castle, which is possible, so the trope is downplayed.


'''Kang:''' I am actually speaking Rigellian. By astonishing coincidence, both of our languages are exactly the same.** The episode featuring a guest appearance by Creator/RayRomano (as "Ray Magini") centers around all the other characters thinking Ray is made-up, and Homer getting increasingly defensive about the existence of his new friend. In the end, after Ray's existence is revealed to everyone, it's explained (by Creator/StephenHawking, no less) that one of the reasons Bart was not able to see him in an earlier scene, despite standing right beside him, was because a reality-warping wormhole had spontaneously opened up in front of Ray. The audience is clearly being trolled at this point, since that same scene featured Bart holding a giant pile of stuff that could have easily been used as an explanation for his blocked line of sight.

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'''Kang:''' I am actually speaking Rigellian. By astonishing coincidence, both of our languages are exactly the same.same.
** The episode featuring a guest appearance by Creator/RayRomano (as "Ray Magini") centers around all the other characters thinking Ray is made-up, and Homer getting increasingly defensive about the existence of his new friend. In the end, after Ray's existence is revealed to everyone, it's explained (by Creator/StephenHawking, no less) that one of the reasons Bart was not able to see him in an earlier scene, despite standing right beside him, was because a reality-warping wormhole had spontaneously opened up in front of Ray. The audience is clearly being trolled at this point, since that same scene featured Bart holding a giant pile of stuff that could have easily been used as an explanation for his blocked line of sight.


'''Kang:''' I am actually speaking Rigellian. By astonishing coincidence, both of our languages are exactly the same.
** A straight example in "That 90's Show". The first flashback episode took place in 1974, and the second flashback episode, which supposedly took place not long after the first, took place in 1980. In this episode, Lisa asks what they were doing during the six years in between (ie: the time between when Homer and Marge first met and when Bart was born). Accordingly, this episode ''should'' have taken place in the 1970s. But guess where it actually ''does'' take place.
** The episode featuring a guest appearance by Creator/RayRomano (as "Ray Magini") centers around all the other characters thinking Ray is made-up, and Homer getting increasingly defensive about the existence of his new friend. In the end, after Ray's existence is revealed to everyone, it's explained (by Creator/StephenHawking, no less) that one of the reasons Bart was not able to see him in an earlier scene, despite standing right beside him, was because a reality-warping wormhole had spontaneously opened up in front of Ray. The audience is clearly being trolled at this point, since that same scene featured Bart holding a giant pile of stuff that could have easily been used as an explanation for his blocked line of sight.

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'''Kang:''' I am actually speaking Rigellian. By astonishing coincidence, both of our languages are exactly the same.
** A straight example in "That 90's Show". The first flashback episode took place in 1974, and the second flashback episode, which supposedly took place not long after the first, took place in 1980. In this episode, Lisa asks what they were doing during the six years in between (ie: the time between when Homer and Marge first met and when Bart was born). Accordingly, this episode ''should'' have taken place in the 1970s. But guess where it actually ''does'' take place.
same.** The episode featuring a guest appearance by Creator/RayRomano (as "Ray Magini") centers around all the other characters thinking Ray is made-up, and Homer getting increasingly defensive about the existence of his new friend. In the end, after Ray's existence is revealed to everyone, it's explained (by Creator/StephenHawking, no less) that one of the reasons Bart was not able to see him in an earlier scene, despite standing right beside him, was because a reality-warping wormhole had spontaneously opened up in front of Ray. The audience is clearly being trolled at this point, since that same scene featured Bart holding a giant pile of stuff that could have easily been used as an explanation for his blocked line of sight.


** Most forms of stun or immobilized give the attacker advantage when attacking the enemy, a way to simulate the idea that when you attack, they cannot defend themselves so you are able to hit them easier. However, you still can miss despite them being unable to dodge your attack. Its commonly justified as being that while they cannot dodge, your attack hits something like a part of their armor or that in your haste to attack, you end up missing. This however doesn't explain flatly how its possible to miss a person who cannot dodge or fight back at point blank range. If it was a case of hitting the wrong spot, why would your character not know that? This also doesn't work on things without armor, how can a character miss hitting a stunned wolf with their sword if the wolf is unable to move. Its almost entirely a gameplay mechanic without a way to justify or logically explain it.
** An example specific to one monster: Time elementals (which first appeared in 1st edtion but were later converted to 3rd edition in the third party book ''Tome Of Horrors'') cause wounds that never heal naturally and [[DeaderThanDead make it harder to bring a victim back from the dead.]] The in-game explanation is that their attacks cause "cell death", the problem being that a lot of [[DamageTyping damage sources]] (such as freezing cold or electricity) also cause cell death (in real life, at least), but aren't any harder to heal than normal.

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** Most forms of stun or immobilized give the attacker advantage when attacking the enemy, a way to simulate the idea that when you attack, they cannot defend themselves so you are able to hit them easier. However, you still can miss despite them being unable to dodge your attack. Its commonly justified as being that while they cannot dodge, dodge your attack, the attack hits something like a part of their armor the enemies armor/body that qualifies it as a miss, or that the attacker is unable to hit due to tripping up in your haste to attack, you end up missing. This some way. The issue with this approach however is that it doesn't explain flatly how make sense logically speaking. For starters, if its possible to miss a person who cannot dodge or fight back at point blank range. If it was a case of the player hitting the wrong spot, why would your character they hit there when they could hit anywhere else? While someone could have armor thick enough to block it, if the person lacks armor, it doesn't make sense for them to somehow not know that? at least damage them. This also doesn't work on things without armor, armor since they shouldn't be able to just naturally tank an attack; how can a character miss hitting a stunned wolf with their sword if the wolf is unable to move. move and has no armor? Its almost entirely a gameplay mechanic without a way to justify or logically explain it.
it from a story perspective.
** An example specific to one monster: Time elementals (which first appeared in 1st edtion edition but were later converted to 3rd edition in the third party book ''Tome Of Horrors'') cause wounds that never heal naturally and [[DeaderThanDead make it harder to bring a victim back from the dead.]] The in-game explanation is that their attacks cause "cell death", the problem being that a lot of [[DamageTyping damage sources]] (such as freezing cold or electricity) also cause cell death (in real life, at least), but aren't any harder to heal than normal.



** Starting with 3rd edition, there has been the infamous Wall Of The Faithless, which is basically a giant wall around Kelemvor's (the god of death's) realm were people who didn't worship any god(s) in life have their souls trapped and [[FateWorseThanDeath slowly disintegrated]] until they [[CessationOfExistence simply cease to exist]]. At first there was no explanation for why the Wall existed, but when the writers realized that the Wall made Kelemvor (Who is inteded to be LawfulNeutral) seem like a [[JerkassGods massive asshole]], they decided that the Wall was made by the previous death god Myrkul (who was evil) and Kelemvor wanted to remove it and just reward or punish unbelievers based on their deeds in life. Unfortunately, this made enough stop worshipping gods (who [[GodsNeedPrayerBadly need worship to survive]]) that he had to put it back in place. The problems with this explanation are two-fold: 1. Getting a good afterlife isn't the only reason people worship gods in the Realms, as they provide other benefits such as giving their clerics magic powers (among other things) and. 2. It still makes Kelemvor look bad, as it raises the question of why he can't just make the souls of non-believers [[CessationOfExistence cease to exist]], as that seems far less cruel (and happens anyway after the Wall is done with them.)

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** Starting with 3rd edition, there has been the infamous Wall Of The Faithless, which is basically a giant wall around Kelemvor's (the god of death's) realm were people who didn't worship any god(s) in life have their souls trapped and [[FateWorseThanDeath slowly disintegrated]] until they [[CessationOfExistence simply cease to exist]]. At first there was no explanation for why the Wall existed, but when the writers realized that the Wall made Kelemvor (Who (who is inteded intended to be LawfulNeutral) seem like a [[JerkassGods massive asshole]], they decided that the Wall was made by the previous death god Myrkul (who was evil) and Kelemvor wanted to remove it and just reward or punish unbelievers based on their deeds in life. Unfortunately, this made enough stop worshipping worshiping gods (who [[GodsNeedPrayerBadly need worship to survive]]) that he had to put it back in place. The problems with this explanation are two-fold: 1. Getting a good afterlife isn't the only reason people worship gods in the Realms, as they provide other benefits such as giving their clerics magic powers (among other things) and. 2. It still makes Kelemvor look bad, as it raises the question of why he can't just make the souls of non-believers [[CessationOfExistence cease to exist]], as that seems far less cruel (and happens anyway after the Wall is done with them.)

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* There is a [[{{Fanon}} common fan explanation]] that Secondary Adamantium (not quite, but still nigh–indestructible, with the added benefit that this makes it ''much'' easier to produce and therefore much more common) does not cause blood poisoning, allowing for Bullseye's spine to be made from that. (Also provides a potential explanation for Wolverine's PowerCreepPowerSeep if his second adamantium skeleton is secondary adamantium, allowing his healing factor to focus on other things.)


** ''WesternAnimation/Ben10AlienForce'' has Gwen's magical powers explained as alien powers inherited from her alien grandmother. The episode in which this revelation is made clear goes on to say that there is no such thing as magic. This despite on a previous episode Gwen clearly used divination to locate their enemies, to say nothing of how the former series ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}}'' showcased were spells read from incantations, a fountain of youth, and soul-swapping. Then WordOfGod would go on to say that both Hex and Charmcaster are in fact magic users, with ''Ultimate Alien'' giving the impression that Gwen has both alien superpowers ''and'' magical abilities. She simply doesn't know where to draw the line between them since they're similar and come from the same source ("mana").

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** ''WesternAnimation/Ben10AlienForce'' has Gwen's magical powers explained as alien powers inherited from her alien grandmother. The episode in which this revelation is made clear goes on to say that there is no such thing as magic. This despite on a previous episode Gwen clearly used divination to locate their enemies, to say nothing of how the former series ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}}'' showcased were spells read from incantations, a fountain of youth, and soul-swapping. Then Then, WordOfGod would go on to say that both Hex and Charmcaster are in fact magic users, with ''Ultimate Alien'' giving the impression that Gwen has both alien superpowers ''and'' magical abilities. She simply doesn't know where to draw the line between them since they're similar and come from the same source ("mana").



*** Several of the retcons and continuity changes were handwaved in "So Long and Thanks for the Smoothies" by [[ApocalypseHow the Universe having been destroyed by]] [[DoomsdayDevice the Anihilarg]] and Ben rebuilding it as [[PhysicalGod Alien X]]; [[CosmicRetcon any little changes can be attributed to Ben's flawed memory or inability to use Alien X properly]]. How he re-created parts of the Universe he had never seen or heard of, and how an alien whose power is to be omnipotent can make mistakes in rebuilding the Universe, is left unexplained. Some fans consider this to be the animated equivalent of the "Superboy-Prime punches time" meme.
*** The Rooter story arc makes a retcon in an attempt to explain some controversial AF elements, such as the change in Kevin's origin (who went from being a {{Mutant|s}} to a HalfHumanHybrid descended from an alien species known as Osmosian) and the existence of various [[HalfHumanHybrid Human-Alien Hybrids]]. Said explanation is that Osmosians actually ''are'' a subspecies of human similar to mutants, the various hybrid kids were actually regular humans who got their alien traits by being Guinea Pigs for a Black Op, and none of them remembered this because they suffered LaserGuidedAmnesia. Problem is, that doesn't explain why nobody before questioned the fact Kevin claimed to be from an alien species that apparently didn't exist, nor does it explain why nobody ever questioned how the Plumber's Kids were the sole alien-human hybrids of their kind in existence.

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*** Several of the retcons and continuity changes were handwaved in "So Long and Thanks for the Smoothies" by [[ApocalypseHow the Universe having been destroyed by]] [[DoomsdayDevice the Anihilarg]] and Ben rebuilding it as [[PhysicalGod Alien X]]; X.]] [[CosmicRetcon any little changes can be attributed to Ben's flawed memory or inability to use Alien X properly]]. properly.]] How he re-created parts of the Universe he had never seen or heard of, and how an alien whose power is to be omnipotent can make mistakes in rebuilding the Universe, is left unexplained. Some fans consider this to be the animated equivalent of the "Superboy-Prime punches time" meme.
*** The Rooter Rooters story arc makes a retcon in an attempt to explain some controversial AF elements, such as the change in Kevin's origin (who went from being a {{Mutant|s}} to a HalfHumanHybrid descended from an alien species known as Osmosian) and the existence of various [[HalfHumanHybrid Human-Alien Hybrids]]. Hybrids.]] Said explanation is that Osmosians actually ''are'' a subspecies of human similar to mutants, the various hybrid kids were actually regular humans who got their alien traits by being Guinea Pigs guinea pigs for a Black Op, black op, and none of them remembered this because they suffered LaserGuidedAmnesia. Problem is, that doesn't explain why nobody before questioned the fact Kevin claimed to be from an alien species that apparently didn't exist, nor does it explain why nobody ever questioned how the Plumber's Kids were the sole alien-human hybrids of their kind in existence.



** WordOfGod's explanation for what ghosts are: they're not dead people; they're beings from another dimension who have taken on the ''memories and appearances'' of dead people. Fan reaction to this proclamation was uniformly negative, with some believing it to be a cop-out attempt to appease the MoralGuardians, especially since it seems to contradict the show itself! Most notably, Poindexter, a DeliberatelyMonochrome ghost stuck in TheFifties. Because that's when he attended Casper High ''when he was alive.''

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** WordOfGod's explanation for what ghosts are: they're not dead people; people, they're beings from another dimension who have taken on the ''memories and appearances'' of dead people. Fan reaction to this proclamation was uniformly negative, with some believing it to be a cop-out attempt to appease the MoralGuardians, especially since it seems to contradict the show itself! Most notably, Poindexter, a DeliberatelyMonochrome ghost stuck in TheFifties. Because that's when he attended Casper High ''when he was alive.''



* WordOfGod of ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'' says that [[CompanionCube Plank]] is just a hunk of wood. While most of the strange incidents concerning Plank could be the insanity of Johnny, Plank's owner, a few things just can't be explained. For example, in "Rent-A-Ed", Plank told Johnny that Eddy had messed up the kitchen -- while Johnny was trapped in a tree far away from the incident. He also manages to sprout a branch in "Scrambled Ed", and drives a bus in ''[[WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddysBigPictureShow Big Picture Show]]''.

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* WordOfGod of ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'' says that [[CompanionCube Plank]] is just a hunk of wood. While most of the strange incidents concerning Plank could be the insanity of Johnny, Plank's owner, a few things just can't be explained. For example, in "Rent-A-Ed", Plank told Johnny that Eddy had messed up the kitchen -- while Johnny was trapped in a tree far away from the incident. He also manages to sprout a branch in "Scrambled Ed", and drives a bus in ''[[WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddysBigPictureShow Big Picture Show]]''.Show.]]''



--->'''Salty:''' The longer we stay here the more people'll question how a fisherman with no engineering background managed to [[ItMakesSenseInContext build a sophisticated talking fish robot]].

to:

--->'''Salty:''' The longer we stay here the more people'll question how a fisherman with no engineering background managed to [[ItMakesSenseInContext build a sophisticated talking fish robot]].robot.]]



'''Farnsworth:''' Well, Omicron Persei 8 is about a thousand light years away, so [[AliensStealCable electromagnetic waves would just recently have gotten there]]. You see--\\

to:

'''Farnsworth:''' Well, Omicron Persei 8 is about a thousand light years away, so [[AliensStealCable electromagnetic waves would just recently have gotten there]]. there.]] You see--\\



** In the fourth movie, Richard Nixon's head (through Fry's mind reading) admits that the one thing they never figured out was that they really ''did'' fake the moon landing -- on Venus!
** In [[Recap/FuturamaS2E12TheDeepSouth "The Deep South"]], Zoidberg builds an underwater house, only to lose it almost as quickly:

to:

** In the fourth movie, Richard Nixon's head (through Fry's mind reading) admits that the one thing they never figured out was that they really ''did'' fake the moon m
Moon
landing -- on Venus!
** In [[Recap/FuturamaS2E12TheDeepSouth "The Deep South"]], South",]] Zoidberg builds an underwater house, only to lose it almost as quickly:



***It does...in production order, which also explain's Ford's absence.



* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/JimmyTwoShoes'', when Molotov sees a dancing house and demands an explanation. Heloise replies that the house owed her a favour.

to:

* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/JimmyTwoShoes'', when Molotov sees a dancing house and demands an explanation. Heloise replies that the house owed her a favour.favor.



** The use of platinum armor to make mechs immune to metalbending. Even if you handwave wave the rarity and expense of so much platinum by saying it [[WorthlessYellowRocks might not be as rare in the Avatar world]], that still leaves the issue that platinum is a relatively soft metal (closest to soft iron), so would make horrible armor for any purpose other than resisting metalbending[[note]]Like Mandaloran armor in the ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' universe; which is made of a material that can NoSell lightsabers, but is rubbish against anything else.[[/note]] Any strong Earthbender (of the type likely to be part of any defensive force) could destroy any such mech with a single boulder. And any sort of electroplating or platinum alloy would reduce the metal's purity, lowering its resistance to bending. Also, like gold, it's heavy, which would make it a doubly-horrible choice for armoring [[spoiler:Kuvira's giant mech from season 4]]. It could be argued that the platinum armor is meant specifically to counter metalbenders, who the show portrays as suffering from CripplingOverspecialization. But that makes sense for Zaofu and Republic City, not the Earth Kingdom at large. And any attempt at arguing that Avatarverse platinum might not correspond to real world platinum (might be stronger, not as heavy) means that it isn't really platinum: it's {{Unobtanium}} being [[CallASmeerpARabbit called "platinum".]]
* PlayedForLaughs in the ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' episode "Baby Cakes", when the Earth Ponies Mr. and Mrs. Cake have two children -- one of which is a unicorn and the other one is a pegasus. When asked about this, Mr. Cake gives a convoluted genealogical explanation (including a relative who is related by marriage, not blood), then adds "[[LampshadeHanging That makes sense, right?]]" (complete with nervous AsideGlance). Fanon has since assumed that the three races (earth ponies, pegasi, and unicorns) can and often do intermarry, and the resulting foals are usually either of the races of the two parents. If not, that can be explained by an ancestor of one of the two parents being that race or, if fans are feeling much more cynical, [[ChocolateBaby that Mrs. Cake was unfaithful]].
* Played for laughs in ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb''. When the anti-intellectual bully Buford is revealed to be fluent in French, he waves it off as being easy to learn if you know Latin. Another episode had an acknowledged one when Dr. Doofenshmirtz's teleporter, after spinning a wheel of possible destinations, sends its targets into his pants; he figures out that the he confused it with his dry-cleaning wheel, hence why his pants were among the possibilities... but he has no idea why his dry-cleaning wheel is a thing that exists.

to:

** The use of platinum armor to make mechs immune to metalbending. Even if you handwave wave the rarity and expense of so much platinum by saying it [[WorthlessYellowRocks might not be as rare in the Avatar world]], world,]] that still leaves the issue that platinum is a relatively soft metal (closest to soft iron), so would make horrible armor for any purpose other than resisting metalbending[[note]]Like Mandaloran armor in the ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' universe; universe, which is made of a material that can NoSell lightsabers, but is rubbish against anything else.[[/note]] Any strong Earthbender (of the type likely to be part of any defensive force) could destroy any such mech with a single boulder. And any sort of electroplating or platinum alloy would reduce the metal's purity, lowering its resistance to bending. Also, like gold, it's heavy, which would make it a doubly-horrible choice for armoring [[spoiler:Kuvira's giant mech from season 4]]. 4.]] It could be argued that the platinum armor is meant specifically to counter metalbenders, who the show portrays as suffering from CripplingOverspecialization. But that makes sense for Zaofu and Republic City, not the Earth Kingdom at large. And any attempt at arguing that Avatarverse platinum might not correspond to real world platinum (might be stronger, not as heavy) means that it isn't really platinum: it's {{Unobtanium}} being [[CallASmeerpARabbit called "platinum".]]
* PlayedForLaughs in the ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' episode "Baby Cakes", when the Earth Ponies Mr. and Mrs. Cake have two children -- one of which is a unicorn and the other one is a pegasus. When asked about this, Mr. Cake gives a convoluted genealogical explanation (including a relative who is related by marriage, not blood), then adds "[[LampshadeHanging That makes sense, right?]]" (complete with nervous AsideGlance). Fanon has since assumed that the three races (earth ponies, pegasi, and unicorns) can and often do intermarry, and the resulting foals are usually either of the races of the two parents. If not, that can be explained by an ancestor of one of the two parents being that race or, if fans are feeling much more cynical, [[ChocolateBaby that Mrs. Cake was unfaithful]].
unfaithful.]]
* Played for laughs in ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb''. When the anti-intellectual bully Buford is revealed to be fluent in French, he waves it off as being easy to learn if you know Latin. Another episode had an acknowledged one when Dr. Doofenshmirtz's teleporter, after spinning a wheel of possible destinations, sends its targets into his pants; he pants. He figures out that the he confused it with his dry-cleaning wheel, hence why his pants were among the possibilities... possibilities...but he has no idea why his dry-cleaning wheel is a thing that exists.


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Bambi}}'' has one in form of how fast the characters age. The original movie implies that the Spring after Bambi's Mother died is the immediate Spring afterward, making it rather strange that Bambi has suddenly undergone a big growth spurt when we had last seen him as a scrawny fawn (to say nothing of how Bambi should have already been close to that large by winter [[ArtisticLicenseBiology if real life deer aging is taken into account]]). At least one of the [[ComicBookAdaptation Dell Comic adaptations]] of the first movie, as well as the [[WesternAnimation/BambiII midquel movie]], tries to HandWave this by stating that the spring we see Yearling Bambi in is actually [[TimeSkip takes place a year after that fateful winter]] and isn't the immediate spring, which gives a much more plausible length of time for Bambi to grow so much. But then ''another'' Disney comic adaptation also stated [[ContinuitySnarl that it was the immediate Spring and not a later on]]. And then the Dell comic book adaptation of ''Bambi's Children'' throws a wrench into all of this by having the eponymous fawns abruptly shown grow up after winter via a TimeSkip--but this time, the narration explicitly points out that its the immediate spring and not a later one!

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Bambi}}'' has one in form of how fast the characters age. The original movie implies that the Spring after Bambi's Mother died is the immediate Spring afterward, making it rather strange that Bambi has suddenly undergone a big growth spurt when we had last seen him as a scrawny fawn (to say nothing of how Bambi should have already been close to that large by winter [[ArtisticLicenseBiology if real life deer aging is taken into account]]). At least one of the [[ComicBookAdaptation Dell Comic adaptations]] of the first movie, as well as the [[WesternAnimation/BambiII midquel movie]], movie,]] tries to HandWave this by stating that the spring we see Yearling Bambi in is actually [[TimeSkip takes place a year after that fateful winter]] and isn't the immediate spring, which gives a much more plausible length of time for Bambi to grow so much. But then ''another'' Disney comic adaptation also stated [[ContinuitySnarl that it was the immediate Spring spring and not a later on]]. one.]] And then the Dell comic Comic book adaptation of ''Bambi's Children'' throws a wrench into all of this by having the eponymous fawns abruptly shown grow grown up after winter via a TimeSkip--but this time, the narration explicitly points out that its it's the immediate spring and not a later one!



* ''WesternAnimation/DespicableMe'' heavily implies (although never outright states) that Gru created the Minions, since we see a "blueprint" of a Minion in the background of a shot of Gru's lab. However, when it came time to do [[WesternAnimation/{{Minions}} a spinoff featuring the Minions]], that was understandably too restrictive, so the Minions instead became creatures that existed since the dawn of time to serve evil. Of course, that leads to some very awkward questions - not least, [[StupidJetpackHitler did Hitler have Minions]]? So instead, the Minions became depressed after the defeat of UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte and hid in a cave for 150 years, conveniently avoiding the horrors of the 19th and 20th centuries until they pop out... er, at the height of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. An awkward handwave to deal with an awkward handwave, but probably [[Administrivia/TropesAreTools better than the alternative]]. Still leaves quite the InferredHolocaust on the Minions' hands, though.
** Another Voodoo Shark is that the ''Minions'' movie mentions the minions always follow the most evil creature they can. Seeing as Gru suffers heavy InUniverse VillainDecay starting from ''the first movie'', which only gets exacerbated in the second (at least in the first movie he was trying to commit an act of supervillainy; in [[WesternAnimation/DespicableMe2 the second]] he's actively working ''against'' villains), it makes one wonder why the Minions bother to keep following him at all instead of changing their allegiance to another, more competent villain. However, in [[WesternAnimation/DespicableMe3 the third movie]], the Minions finally ditch Gru because they wish to be villains again. It doesn't stick.....but in the long run, [[spoiler:they go to work for his brother, Dru]].
* In ''WesternAnimation/FelixTheCatTheMovie'', The Duke of Zill, the ruler of an alternate dimension Felix travels into, based his giant Master Cylinder off of the one in Felix's dimension to serve as his ultimate weapon and the source of power for his mass produced cylinder army. The movies tries to {{handwave}} how this is possible by showing the Duke's blueprints, which have a comparison chart between the main universe Master Cylinder and Zill's take on him, but this opens up a big PlotHole—the Duke didn't have access to the Dimensporter technology that allowed Felix to travel into the dimension, so how could he have possibly known about or seen the Master Cylinder in Felix's universe? It's particularly glaring as the writers could have just as easily not had an alternate universe at all and, if they even felt the need to explain "Oriana" in the first place, simply had it be a different country which Felix traveled to.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/DespicableMe'' heavily implies (although never outright states) that Gru created the Minions, since we see a "blueprint" of a Minion in the background of a shot of Gru's lab. However, when it came time to do [[WesternAnimation/{{Minions}} a spinoff featuring the Minions]], Minions,]] that was understandably too restrictive, so the Minions instead became creatures that existed since the dawn of time to serve evil. Of course, that leads to some very awkward questions - not least, [[StupidJetpackHitler did Hitler have Minions]]? So instead, the Minions became depressed after the defeat of UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte and hid in a cave for 150 years, conveniently avoiding the horrors of the 19th and 20th centuries until they pop out... er, at the height of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. An awkward handwave to deal with an awkward handwave, but probably [[Administrivia/TropesAreTools better than the alternative]]. alternative.]] Still leaves quite the InferredHolocaust on the Minions' hands, though.
** Another Voodoo Shark is that the ''Minions'' movie mentions the minions always follow the most evil creature they can. Seeing as Gru suffers heavy InUniverse VillainDecay starting from ''the first movie'', which only gets exacerbated in the second (at least in the first movie he was trying to commit an act of supervillainy; in supervillainy. In [[WesternAnimation/DespicableMe2 the second]] he's actively working ''against'' villains), it makes one wonder why the Minions bother to keep following him at all instead of changing their allegiance to another, more competent villain. However, in [[WesternAnimation/DespicableMe3 the third movie]], movie,]] the Minions finally ditch Gru because they wish to be villains again. It doesn't stick.....but in the long run, [[spoiler:they go to work for his brother, Dru]].
Dru.]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/FelixTheCatTheMovie'', The Duke of Zill, the ruler of an alternate dimension Felix travels into, based his giant Master Cylinder off of the one in Felix's dimension to serve as his ultimate weapon and the source of power for his mass produced mass-produced cylinder army. The movies tries to {{handwave}} how this is possible by showing the Duke's blueprints, which have a comparison chart between the main universe universe's Master Cylinder and Zill's take on him, but this opens up a big PlotHole—the Duke didn't have access to the Dimensporter technology that allowed Felix to travel into the dimension, so how could he have possibly known about or seen the Master Cylinder in Felix's universe? It's particularly glaring as the writers could have just as easily not had an alternate universe at all and, if they even felt the need to explain "Oriana" in the first place, simply had it be a different country which Felix traveled to.



* The [[http://unshavedmouse.wordpress.com/2013/07/11/disney-reviews-with-the-unshaved-mouse-33-pocahontas/ Unshaved Mouse]] refers to WesternAnimation/{{Pocahontas}} suddenly being able to communicate in English with John Smith after listening to the wind with this [[ReferencedBy/TVTropes exact term]] linked to this very page. He did it again in his ''WesternAnimation/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'' review, when he called out on the movie's explanation of the Atlanteans' ability to speak surface languages as Atlantean is the root of every modern language, which means they can automatically speak English. If you don't know why this is [[ArtisticLicenseLinguistics complete bullshit]]; consider the fact that even [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQVyol7N1Jo Old English]] is nothing like the modern language, and knowing one will ''not'' help you understand the other.

to:

* The [[http://unshavedmouse.wordpress.com/2013/07/11/disney-reviews-with-the-unshaved-mouse-33-pocahontas/ Unshaved Mouse]] refers to WesternAnimation/{{Pocahontas}} suddenly being able to communicate in English with John Smith after listening to the wind with this [[ReferencedBy/TVTropes exact term]] linked to this very page. He did it again in his ''WesternAnimation/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'' review, when he called out on the movie's explanation of the Atlanteans' ability to speak surface languages as Atlantean is the root of every modern language, which means they can automatically speak English. If you don't know why this is [[ArtisticLicenseLinguistics complete bullshit]]; bullshit,]] consider the fact that even [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQVyol7N1Jo Old English]] is nothing like the modern language, and knowing one will ''not'' help you understand the other.

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