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* There is a [[{{Fanon}} common fan explanation]] that Secondary Adamantium (not quite, but still nigh–indestructible, with the added benefit that this makes it ''much'' easier to produce and therefore much more common) does not cause blood poisoning, allowing for Bullseye's spine to be made from that. (Also provides a potential explanation for Wolverine's PowerCreepPowerSeep if his second adamantium skeleton is secondary adamantium, allowing his healing factor to focus on other things.)


** ''WesternAnimation/Ben10AlienForce'' has Gwen's magical powers explained as alien powers inherited from her alien grandmother. The episode in which this revelation is made clear goes on to say that there is no such thing as magic. This despite on a previous episode Gwen clearly used divination to locate their enemies, to say nothing of how the former series ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}}'' showcased were spells read from incantations, a fountain of youth, and soul-swapping. Then WordOfGod would go on to say that both Hex and Charmcaster are in fact magic users, with ''Ultimate Alien'' giving the impression that Gwen has both alien superpowers ''and'' magical abilities. She simply doesn't know where to draw the line between them since they're similar and come from the same source ("mana").

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** ''WesternAnimation/Ben10AlienForce'' has Gwen's magical powers explained as alien powers inherited from her alien grandmother. The episode in which this revelation is made clear goes on to say that there is no such thing as magic. This despite on a previous episode Gwen clearly used divination to locate their enemies, to say nothing of how the former series ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}}'' showcased were spells read from incantations, a fountain of youth, and soul-swapping. Then Then, WordOfGod would go on to say that both Hex and Charmcaster are in fact magic users, with ''Ultimate Alien'' giving the impression that Gwen has both alien superpowers ''and'' magical abilities. She simply doesn't know where to draw the line between them since they're similar and come from the same source ("mana").



*** Several of the retcons and continuity changes were handwaved in "So Long and Thanks for the Smoothies" by [[ApocalypseHow the Universe having been destroyed by]] [[DoomsdayDevice the Anihilarg]] and Ben rebuilding it as [[PhysicalGod Alien X]]; [[CosmicRetcon any little changes can be attributed to Ben's flawed memory or inability to use Alien X properly]]. How he re-created parts of the Universe he had never seen or heard of, and how an alien whose power is to be omnipotent can make mistakes in rebuilding the Universe, is left unexplained. Some fans consider this to be the animated equivalent of the "Superboy-Prime punches time" meme.
*** The Rooter story arc makes a retcon in an attempt to explain some controversial AF elements, such as the change in Kevin's origin (who went from being a {{Mutant|s}} to a HalfHumanHybrid descended from an alien species known as Osmosian) and the existence of various [[HalfHumanHybrid Human-Alien Hybrids]]. Said explanation is that Osmosians actually ''are'' a subspecies of human similar to mutants, the various hybrid kids were actually regular humans who got their alien traits by being Guinea Pigs for a Black Op, and none of them remembered this because they suffered LaserGuidedAmnesia. Problem is, that doesn't explain why nobody before questioned the fact Kevin claimed to be from an alien species that apparently didn't exist, nor does it explain why nobody ever questioned how the Plumber's Kids were the sole alien-human hybrids of their kind in existence.

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*** Several of the retcons and continuity changes were handwaved in "So Long and Thanks for the Smoothies" by [[ApocalypseHow the Universe having been destroyed by]] [[DoomsdayDevice the Anihilarg]] and Ben rebuilding it as [[PhysicalGod Alien X]]; X.]] [[CosmicRetcon any little changes can be attributed to Ben's flawed memory or inability to use Alien X properly]]. properly.]] How he re-created parts of the Universe he had never seen or heard of, and how an alien whose power is to be omnipotent can make mistakes in rebuilding the Universe, is left unexplained. Some fans consider this to be the animated equivalent of the "Superboy-Prime punches time" meme.
*** The Rooter Rooters story arc makes a retcon in an attempt to explain some controversial AF elements, such as the change in Kevin's origin (who went from being a {{Mutant|s}} to a HalfHumanHybrid descended from an alien species known as Osmosian) and the existence of various [[HalfHumanHybrid Human-Alien Hybrids]]. Hybrids.]] Said explanation is that Osmosians actually ''are'' a subspecies of human similar to mutants, the various hybrid kids were actually regular humans who got their alien traits by being Guinea Pigs guinea pigs for a Black Op, black op, and none of them remembered this because they suffered LaserGuidedAmnesia. Problem is, that doesn't explain why nobody before questioned the fact Kevin claimed to be from an alien species that apparently didn't exist, nor does it explain why nobody ever questioned how the Plumber's Kids were the sole alien-human hybrids of their kind in existence.



** WordOfGod's explanation for what ghosts are: they're not dead people; they're beings from another dimension who have taken on the ''memories and appearances'' of dead people. Fan reaction to this proclamation was uniformly negative, with some believing it to be a cop-out attempt to appease the MoralGuardians, especially since it seems to contradict the show itself! Most notably, Poindexter, a DeliberatelyMonochrome ghost stuck in TheFifties. Because that's when he attended Casper High ''when he was alive.''

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** WordOfGod's explanation for what ghosts are: they're not dead people; people, they're beings from another dimension who have taken on the ''memories and appearances'' of dead people. Fan reaction to this proclamation was uniformly negative, with some believing it to be a cop-out attempt to appease the MoralGuardians, especially since it seems to contradict the show itself! Most notably, Poindexter, a DeliberatelyMonochrome ghost stuck in TheFifties. Because that's when he attended Casper High ''when he was alive.''



* WordOfGod of ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'' says that [[CompanionCube Plank]] is just a hunk of wood. While most of the strange incidents concerning Plank could be the insanity of Johnny, Plank's owner, a few things just can't be explained. For example, in "Rent-A-Ed", Plank told Johnny that Eddy had messed up the kitchen -- while Johnny was trapped in a tree far away from the incident. He also manages to sprout a branch in "Scrambled Ed", and drives a bus in ''[[WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddysBigPictureShow Big Picture Show]]''.

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* WordOfGod of ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'' says that [[CompanionCube Plank]] is just a hunk of wood. While most of the strange incidents concerning Plank could be the insanity of Johnny, Plank's owner, a few things just can't be explained. For example, in "Rent-A-Ed", Plank told Johnny that Eddy had messed up the kitchen -- while Johnny was trapped in a tree far away from the incident. He also manages to sprout a branch in "Scrambled Ed", and drives a bus in ''[[WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddysBigPictureShow Big Picture Show]]''.Show.]]''



--->'''Salty:''' The longer we stay here the more people'll question how a fisherman with no engineering background managed to [[ItMakesSenseInContext build a sophisticated talking fish robot]].

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--->'''Salty:''' The longer we stay here the more people'll question how a fisherman with no engineering background managed to [[ItMakesSenseInContext build a sophisticated talking fish robot]].robot.]]



'''Farnsworth:''' Well, Omicron Persei 8 is about a thousand light years away, so [[AliensStealCable electromagnetic waves would just recently have gotten there]]. You see--\\

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'''Farnsworth:''' Well, Omicron Persei 8 is about a thousand light years away, so [[AliensStealCable electromagnetic waves would just recently have gotten there]]. there.]] You see--\\



** In the fourth movie, Richard Nixon's head (through Fry's mind reading) admits that the one thing they never figured out was that they really ''did'' fake the moon landing -- on Venus!
** In [[Recap/FuturamaS2E12TheDeepSouth "The Deep South"]], Zoidberg builds an underwater house, only to lose it almost as quickly:

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** In the fourth movie, Richard Nixon's head (through Fry's mind reading) admits that the one thing they never figured out was that they really ''did'' fake the moon m
Moon
landing -- on Venus!
** In [[Recap/FuturamaS2E12TheDeepSouth "The Deep South"]], South",]] Zoidberg builds an underwater house, only to lose it almost as quickly:



***It does...in production order, which also explain's Ford's absence.



* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/JimmyTwoShoes'', when Molotov sees a dancing house and demands an explanation. Heloise replies that the house owed her a favour.

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* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/JimmyTwoShoes'', when Molotov sees a dancing house and demands an explanation. Heloise replies that the house owed her a favour.favor.



** The use of platinum armor to make mechs immune to metalbending. Even if you handwave wave the rarity and expense of so much platinum by saying it [[WorthlessYellowRocks might not be as rare in the Avatar world]], that still leaves the issue that platinum is a relatively soft metal (closest to soft iron), so would make horrible armor for any purpose other than resisting metalbending[[note]]Like Mandaloran armor in the ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' universe; which is made of a material that can NoSell lightsabers, but is rubbish against anything else.[[/note]] Any strong Earthbender (of the type likely to be part of any defensive force) could destroy any such mech with a single boulder. And any sort of electroplating or platinum alloy would reduce the metal's purity, lowering its resistance to bending. Also, like gold, it's heavy, which would make it a doubly-horrible choice for armoring [[spoiler:Kuvira's giant mech from season 4]]. It could be argued that the platinum armor is meant specifically to counter metalbenders, who the show portrays as suffering from CripplingOverspecialization. But that makes sense for Zaofu and Republic City, not the Earth Kingdom at large. And any attempt at arguing that Avatarverse platinum might not correspond to real world platinum (might be stronger, not as heavy) means that it isn't really platinum: it's {{Unobtanium}} being [[CallASmeerpARabbit called "platinum".]]
* PlayedForLaughs in the ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' episode "Baby Cakes", when the Earth Ponies Mr. and Mrs. Cake have two children -- one of which is a unicorn and the other one is a pegasus. When asked about this, Mr. Cake gives a convoluted genealogical explanation (including a relative who is related by marriage, not blood), then adds "[[LampshadeHanging That makes sense, right?]]" (complete with nervous AsideGlance). Fanon has since assumed that the three races (earth ponies, pegasi, and unicorns) can and often do intermarry, and the resulting foals are usually either of the races of the two parents. If not, that can be explained by an ancestor of one of the two parents being that race or, if fans are feeling much more cynical, [[ChocolateBaby that Mrs. Cake was unfaithful]].
* Played for laughs in ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb''. When the anti-intellectual bully Buford is revealed to be fluent in French, he waves it off as being easy to learn if you know Latin. Another episode had an acknowledged one when Dr. Doofenshmirtz's teleporter, after spinning a wheel of possible destinations, sends its targets into his pants; he figures out that the he confused it with his dry-cleaning wheel, hence why his pants were among the possibilities... but he has no idea why his dry-cleaning wheel is a thing that exists.

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** The use of platinum armor to make mechs immune to metalbending. Even if you handwave wave the rarity and expense of so much platinum by saying it [[WorthlessYellowRocks might not be as rare in the Avatar world]], world,]] that still leaves the issue that platinum is a relatively soft metal (closest to soft iron), so would make horrible armor for any purpose other than resisting metalbending[[note]]Like Mandaloran armor in the ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' universe; universe, which is made of a material that can NoSell lightsabers, but is rubbish against anything else.[[/note]] Any strong Earthbender (of the type likely to be part of any defensive force) could destroy any such mech with a single boulder. And any sort of electroplating or platinum alloy would reduce the metal's purity, lowering its resistance to bending. Also, like gold, it's heavy, which would make it a doubly-horrible choice for armoring [[spoiler:Kuvira's giant mech from season 4]]. 4.]] It could be argued that the platinum armor is meant specifically to counter metalbenders, who the show portrays as suffering from CripplingOverspecialization. But that makes sense for Zaofu and Republic City, not the Earth Kingdom at large. And any attempt at arguing that Avatarverse platinum might not correspond to real world platinum (might be stronger, not as heavy) means that it isn't really platinum: it's {{Unobtanium}} being [[CallASmeerpARabbit called "platinum".]]
* PlayedForLaughs in the ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' episode "Baby Cakes", when the Earth Ponies Mr. and Mrs. Cake have two children -- one of which is a unicorn and the other one is a pegasus. When asked about this, Mr. Cake gives a convoluted genealogical explanation (including a relative who is related by marriage, not blood), then adds "[[LampshadeHanging That makes sense, right?]]" (complete with nervous AsideGlance). Fanon has since assumed that the three races (earth ponies, pegasi, and unicorns) can and often do intermarry, and the resulting foals are usually either of the races of the two parents. If not, that can be explained by an ancestor of one of the two parents being that race or, if fans are feeling much more cynical, [[ChocolateBaby that Mrs. Cake was unfaithful]].
unfaithful.]]
* Played for laughs in ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb''. When the anti-intellectual bully Buford is revealed to be fluent in French, he waves it off as being easy to learn if you know Latin. Another episode had an acknowledged one when Dr. Doofenshmirtz's teleporter, after spinning a wheel of possible destinations, sends its targets into his pants; he pants. He figures out that the he confused it with his dry-cleaning wheel, hence why his pants were among the possibilities... possibilities...but he has no idea why his dry-cleaning wheel is a thing that exists.


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Bambi}}'' has one in form of how fast the characters age. The original movie implies that the Spring after Bambi's Mother died is the immediate Spring afterward, making it rather strange that Bambi has suddenly undergone a big growth spurt when we had last seen him as a scrawny fawn (to say nothing of how Bambi should have already been close to that large by winter [[ArtisticLicenseBiology if real life deer aging is taken into account]]). At least one of the [[ComicBookAdaptation Dell Comic adaptations]] of the first movie, as well as the [[WesternAnimation/BambiII midquel movie]], tries to HandWave this by stating that the spring we see Yearling Bambi in is actually [[TimeSkip takes place a year after that fateful winter]] and isn't the immediate spring, which gives a much more plausible length of time for Bambi to grow so much. But then ''another'' Disney comic adaptation also stated [[ContinuitySnarl that it was the immediate Spring and not a later on]]. And then the Dell comic book adaptation of ''Bambi's Children'' throws a wrench into all of this by having the eponymous fawns abruptly shown grow up after winter via a TimeSkip--but this time, the narration explicitly points out that its the immediate spring and not a later one!

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Bambi}}'' has one in form of how fast the characters age. The original movie implies that the Spring after Bambi's Mother died is the immediate Spring afterward, making it rather strange that Bambi has suddenly undergone a big growth spurt when we had last seen him as a scrawny fawn (to say nothing of how Bambi should have already been close to that large by winter [[ArtisticLicenseBiology if real life deer aging is taken into account]]). At least one of the [[ComicBookAdaptation Dell Comic adaptations]] of the first movie, as well as the [[WesternAnimation/BambiII midquel movie]], movie,]] tries to HandWave this by stating that the spring we see Yearling Bambi in is actually [[TimeSkip takes place a year after that fateful winter]] and isn't the immediate spring, which gives a much more plausible length of time for Bambi to grow so much. But then ''another'' Disney comic adaptation also stated [[ContinuitySnarl that it was the immediate Spring spring and not a later on]]. one.]] And then the Dell comic Comic book adaptation of ''Bambi's Children'' throws a wrench into all of this by having the eponymous fawns abruptly shown grow grown up after winter via a TimeSkip--but this time, the narration explicitly points out that its it's the immediate spring and not a later one!



* ''WesternAnimation/DespicableMe'' heavily implies (although never outright states) that Gru created the Minions, since we see a "blueprint" of a Minion in the background of a shot of Gru's lab. However, when it came time to do [[WesternAnimation/{{Minions}} a spinoff featuring the Minions]], that was understandably too restrictive, so the Minions instead became creatures that existed since the dawn of time to serve evil. Of course, that leads to some very awkward questions - not least, [[StupidJetpackHitler did Hitler have Minions]]? So instead, the Minions became depressed after the defeat of UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte and hid in a cave for 150 years, conveniently avoiding the horrors of the 19th and 20th centuries until they pop out... er, at the height of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. An awkward handwave to deal with an awkward handwave, but probably [[Administrivia/TropesAreTools better than the alternative]]. Still leaves quite the InferredHolocaust on the Minions' hands, though.
** Another Voodoo Shark is that the ''Minions'' movie mentions the minions always follow the most evil creature they can. Seeing as Gru suffers heavy InUniverse VillainDecay starting from ''the first movie'', which only gets exacerbated in the second (at least in the first movie he was trying to commit an act of supervillainy; in [[WesternAnimation/DespicableMe2 the second]] he's actively working ''against'' villains), it makes one wonder why the Minions bother to keep following him at all instead of changing their allegiance to another, more competent villain. However, in [[WesternAnimation/DespicableMe3 the third movie]], the Minions finally ditch Gru because they wish to be villains again. It doesn't stick.....but in the long run, [[spoiler:they go to work for his brother, Dru]].
* In ''WesternAnimation/FelixTheCatTheMovie'', The Duke of Zill, the ruler of an alternate dimension Felix travels into, based his giant Master Cylinder off of the one in Felix's dimension to serve as his ultimate weapon and the source of power for his mass produced cylinder army. The movies tries to {{handwave}} how this is possible by showing the Duke's blueprints, which have a comparison chart between the main universe Master Cylinder and Zill's take on him, but this opens up a big PlotHole—the Duke didn't have access to the Dimensporter technology that allowed Felix to travel into the dimension, so how could he have possibly known about or seen the Master Cylinder in Felix's universe? It's particularly glaring as the writers could have just as easily not had an alternate universe at all and, if they even felt the need to explain "Oriana" in the first place, simply had it be a different country which Felix traveled to.

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* ''WesternAnimation/DespicableMe'' heavily implies (although never outright states) that Gru created the Minions, since we see a "blueprint" of a Minion in the background of a shot of Gru's lab. However, when it came time to do [[WesternAnimation/{{Minions}} a spinoff featuring the Minions]], Minions,]] that was understandably too restrictive, so the Minions instead became creatures that existed since the dawn of time to serve evil. Of course, that leads to some very awkward questions - not least, [[StupidJetpackHitler did Hitler have Minions]]? So instead, the Minions became depressed after the defeat of UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte and hid in a cave for 150 years, conveniently avoiding the horrors of the 19th and 20th centuries until they pop out... er, at the height of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. An awkward handwave to deal with an awkward handwave, but probably [[Administrivia/TropesAreTools better than the alternative]]. alternative.]] Still leaves quite the InferredHolocaust on the Minions' hands, though.
** Another Voodoo Shark is that the ''Minions'' movie mentions the minions always follow the most evil creature they can. Seeing as Gru suffers heavy InUniverse VillainDecay starting from ''the first movie'', which only gets exacerbated in the second (at least in the first movie he was trying to commit an act of supervillainy; in supervillainy. In [[WesternAnimation/DespicableMe2 the second]] he's actively working ''against'' villains), it makes one wonder why the Minions bother to keep following him at all instead of changing their allegiance to another, more competent villain. However, in [[WesternAnimation/DespicableMe3 the third movie]], movie,]] the Minions finally ditch Gru because they wish to be villains again. It doesn't stick.....but in the long run, [[spoiler:they go to work for his brother, Dru]].
Dru.]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/FelixTheCatTheMovie'', The Duke of Zill, the ruler of an alternate dimension Felix travels into, based his giant Master Cylinder off of the one in Felix's dimension to serve as his ultimate weapon and the source of power for his mass produced mass-produced cylinder army. The movies tries to {{handwave}} how this is possible by showing the Duke's blueprints, which have a comparison chart between the main universe universe's Master Cylinder and Zill's take on him, but this opens up a big PlotHole—the Duke didn't have access to the Dimensporter technology that allowed Felix to travel into the dimension, so how could he have possibly known about or seen the Master Cylinder in Felix's universe? It's particularly glaring as the writers could have just as easily not had an alternate universe at all and, if they even felt the need to explain "Oriana" in the first place, simply had it be a different country which Felix traveled to.



* The [[http://unshavedmouse.wordpress.com/2013/07/11/disney-reviews-with-the-unshaved-mouse-33-pocahontas/ Unshaved Mouse]] refers to WesternAnimation/{{Pocahontas}} suddenly being able to communicate in English with John Smith after listening to the wind with this [[ReferencedBy/TVTropes exact term]] linked to this very page. He did it again in his ''WesternAnimation/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'' review, when he called out on the movie's explanation of the Atlanteans' ability to speak surface languages as Atlantean is the root of every modern language, which means they can automatically speak English. If you don't know why this is [[ArtisticLicenseLinguistics complete bullshit]]; consider the fact that even [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQVyol7N1Jo Old English]] is nothing like the modern language, and knowing one will ''not'' help you understand the other.

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* The [[http://unshavedmouse.wordpress.com/2013/07/11/disney-reviews-with-the-unshaved-mouse-33-pocahontas/ Unshaved Mouse]] refers to WesternAnimation/{{Pocahontas}} suddenly being able to communicate in English with John Smith after listening to the wind with this [[ReferencedBy/TVTropes exact term]] linked to this very page. He did it again in his ''WesternAnimation/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'' review, when he called out on the movie's explanation of the Atlanteans' ability to speak surface languages as Atlantean is the root of every modern language, which means they can automatically speak English. If you don't know why this is [[ArtisticLicenseLinguistics complete bullshit]]; bullshit,]] consider the fact that even [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQVyol7N1Jo Old English]] is nothing like the modern language, and knowing one will ''not'' help you understand the other.


* ''FanFic/TheNuptialverse'' has a [[WordOfGod self-admitted]] example: In a flashback, Twilight explains to Spike that it's impossible for ponies to shape shift anything. This was meant to explain away why it never occurred to Twilight that the Cadence who didn't recognize her was an impostor and why the shape shifting was a uniquely changeling trait. However, it was pointed out that Twilight has shape shifted several things in the show proper. The author has since [[{{Rewrite}} rewritten]] it to state that shape shifting one sapient being to another takes a load of magic, more than many can use, making it impractical for a pony to disguise herself as such.

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* ''FanFic/TheNuptialverse'' has a [[WordOfGod self-admitted]] example: In a flashback, Twilight explains to Spike that it's impossible for ponies to shape shift shapeshift anything. This was meant to explain away why it never occurred to Twilight that the Cadence Cadance who didn't recognize her was an impostor and why the shape shifting shapeshifting was a uniquely changeling trait. However, it was pointed out that Twilight has shape shifted shapeshifted several things in the show proper. The author has since [[{{Rewrite}} rewritten]] it to state that shape shifting shapeshifting one sapient being to another takes a load of magic, more than many can use, making it impractical for a pony to disguise herself as such.



** Exposure to [[TheCorruption Dark Chaos Energy]] is established to be able to rapidly evolve Shroud parasites. Despite this, during his fight with Dark Tails in Episode 69, Tails does not lose control and [[LovecraftianSuperpower mutate into Shroud Tails]]. This is explained later on - Tails has to directly absorb Dark Chaos Energy to mutate. However, this doesn't explain his first mutation in Episode 67... when he wasn't exposed to any energy at all. This is handwaved later on that the transformation in Episode 67 was an angry "spasm" rather than a full evolution, but it's not much better.

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** Exposure to [[TheCorruption Dark Chaos Energy]] is established to be able to rapidly evolve Shroud parasites. Despite this, during his fight with Dark Tails in Episode 69, Tails does not lose control and [[LovecraftianSuperpower mutate into Shroud Tails]]. This is explained later on - Tails has to directly absorb Dark Chaos Energy to mutate. However, this doesn't explain his first mutation in Episode 67... when he wasn't exposed to any energy at all. This is handwaved later on that the transformation in Episode 67 was an angry "spasm" rather than a full evolution, but it's not much better.


** The biggest issue in the mythos, especially nowadays: why doesn't Batman [[JustEatGilligan just kill]] ComicBook/TheJoker? Many answers have come forth, anything from Batman thinking that if he breaks [[ThouShaltNotKill his one rule]] he won't have the willpower to make himself [[JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope stop]] killing ''all'' criminals (Ra's Al Ghul is a madman Bats is ''definitely'' willing to kill to stop, but Ra's has the advantage of having access to Lazarus Pits so he won't stay dead) to Batman thinking that killing the Joker really isn't going to do anything to reduce crime in Gotham (someone just as bad if not worse will just appear, he thinks, but certain arcs make clear that even an AncientConspiracy like the Court of Owls [[EvilerThanThou has nothing on the Joker in terms of viciousness]]) to Commissioner Gordon enforcing Batman's decision and declaring that if he ever kills the Joker, Gordon will consider him just as mad-dog crazy as all of the other Gotham supercriminals and bring him down (the Joker is a '''very''' notorious CopKiller) to Batman thinking that the decision to kill the Joker should only be in the hands of the law (New Jersey ([[WhereTheHellIsSpringfield where Gotham is sometimes said to be]]) is a state with no death penalty). Some arcs even provide a more supernatural explanation like Joker making people believe that he's a demon in ''Endgame'' and post-''Rebirth'' it's been revealed that the Joker, if killed, will exude a variation of the Joker Toxin that will immediately turn whoever is in the vicinity into a virtual Joker clone (this is the origin of The Batman Who Laughs, even). In the end, the true reason is simple: [[JokerImmunity Joker stories sell]].

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** The biggest issue in the mythos, especially nowadays: why doesn't Batman [[JustEatGilligan just kill]] ComicBook/TheJoker? Many answers have come forth, anything from Batman thinking that if he breaks [[ThouShaltNotKill his one rule]] he won't have the willpower to make himself [[JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope stop]] killing ''all'' criminals (Ra's Al Ghul (ComicBook/RasAlGhul is a madman Bats is ''definitely'' willing to kill to stop, but Ra's has the advantage of having access to Lazarus Pits so he won't stay dead) to Batman thinking that killing the Joker really isn't going to do anything to reduce crime in Gotham (someone just as bad if not worse will just appear, he thinks, but certain arcs make clear that even an AncientConspiracy like the Court of Owls [[EvilerThanThou has nothing on the Joker in terms of viciousness]]) to Commissioner Gordon enforcing Batman's decision and declaring that if he ever kills the Joker, Gordon will consider him just as mad-dog crazy as all of the other Gotham supercriminals and bring him down (the Joker is a '''very''' notorious CopKiller) to Batman thinking that the decision to kill the Joker should only be in the hands of the law (New Jersey ([[WhereTheHellIsSpringfield where Gotham is sometimes said to be]]) is a state with no death penalty). Some arcs even provide a more supernatural explanation like Joker making people believe that he's a demon in ''Endgame'' and post-''Rebirth'' it's been revealed that the Joker, if killed, will exude a variation of the Joker Toxin that will immediately turn whoever is in the vicinity into a virtual Joker clone (this is the origin of The Batman Who Laughs, even). In the end, the true reason is simple: [[JokerImmunity Joker stories sell]].



* There was the attempt to absolve the Hulk of any major charges for his rampages by arguing that, improbably, he's ''never'' killed anyone during them. Apparently Bruce is so concerned he might and also ''that'' intelligent, he subconsciously restrains the Hulk and calculates his actions so he never kills anyone.

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* There was the attempt to absolve the Hulk ComicBook/IncredibleHulk of any major charges for [[InferredHolocaust his rampages rampages]] by arguing that, improbably, he's ''never'' [[NoEndorHolocaust he's]] ''[[NoEndorHolocaust never]]'' [[NoEndorHolocaust killed anyone during them.them]]. Apparently Bruce is so concerned he might and also ''that'' intelligent, he subconsciously restrains the Hulk and calculates his actions so he never kills anyone.



* ''ComicBook/JLAActOfGod'': Every explanation or handwave as to why this group of heroes was affected by The Black Wave or where this group went just generated more questions (without really answering the first one). The technological heroes are still active, so why did Kyle Rayner's Green Lantern ring, Atom's shrinking rig and Steel's armor stop working (And why did Steel's armor start working again)? Why did the Black Wave effect heroes of extra-normal origin (like Superman, Aquaman, Starfire or Martian Manhunter), since they had no metagene to neutralize? The magic heroes suddenly vanished. So how are Wonder Woman (empowered by the Greek Gods) Billy Batson (Captain Marvel is explicitly magic-powered), the Linda Danvers Supergirl (an earthborn angel) and Red Tornado (at the time was an Air Elemental) still around?
** Also, the answer the comic all but states ([[DiabolusExMachina "God did it"]]) comes with it's own questions. Namely A) Why? B) If this, indeed, some sort of punishment for metahuman arrogance, why then allow them to pick up where they left off with technology? Is throwing tanks around in power armor that less likely to feed arrogance than genetics or magic? C) Why allow them to truly start over via [[spoiler:Superman and Wonder Woman's son?]]
* The ''ComicBook/LegionOfSuperheroes'' comics were fairly notorious for MonochromeCasting and HumansAreWhite, with the common joke being that the team had more [[RubberForeheadAliens blue people]] on it than black, and even crowd shots often [[ExecutiveMeddling being edited]] to remove black people. In the 70s, it was revealed that this was because... all the black people on Earth had become racial separatists, and now lived on an island off the African coast that occasionally vanishes entirely. On top of being ''staggeringly'' racist (Mike Grell even had a WriterRevolt over it), it raised countless questions. How did the entire black population of Earth become racial separatists, a viewpoint controversial even then? Did Earth become so racist at some point that even native Africans wanted to leave their homelands? Why are black people still the biggest prejudice target when aliens are walking around? How can this one island support a billion-plus black population? Why didn't they just colonize another planet? Pretty much every writer since has completely ignored the idea, and for good reason.

to:

* ''ComicBook/JLAActOfGod'': Every explanation or handwave as to why this group of heroes was affected by The Black Wave or where this group went just generated more questions (without really answering the first one). The technological heroes are still active, so why did Kyle Rayner's Green Lantern ring, Atom's shrinking rig and Steel's armor stop working (And why did Steel's armor start working again)? Why did the Black Wave effect affect heroes of extra-normal origin (like Superman, Aquaman, Starfire or Martian Manhunter), since they had no metagene to neutralize? The magic heroes suddenly vanished. So how are Wonder Woman (empowered by the Greek Gods) Billy Batson (Captain Marvel is explicitly magic-powered), the Linda Danvers Supergirl (an earthborn angel) and Red Tornado (at the time was an Air Elemental) still around?
**
around? Also, the answer the comic all but states ([[DiabolusExMachina "God did it"]]) comes with it's own questions. Namely A) Why? B) If this, indeed, some sort of punishment for metahuman arrogance, why then allow them to pick up where they left off with technology? Is throwing tanks around in power armor that less likely to feed arrogance than genetics or magic? C) Why allow them to truly start over via [[spoiler:Superman and Wonder Woman's son?]]
son]]?
* The ''ComicBook/LegionOfSuperheroes'' ''ComicBook/LegionOfSuperHeroes'' comics were fairly notorious for MonochromeCasting and HumansAreWhite, with the common joke being that the team had more [[RubberForeheadAliens blue people]] on it than black, and even crowd shots often [[ExecutiveMeddling being edited]] to remove black people. In the 70s, it was revealed that this was because... all the black people on Earth had become racial separatists, and now lived on an island off the African coast that occasionally vanishes entirely. On top of being ''staggeringly'' racist (Mike Grell even had a WriterRevolt over it), it raised countless questions. How did the entire black population of Earth become racial separatists, a viewpoint controversial even then? Did Earth become so racist at some point that even native Africans wanted to leave their homelands? Why are black people still the biggest prejudice target when aliens are walking around? How can this one island support a billion-plus black population? Why didn't they just colonize another planet? Pretty much every writer since has completely ignored the idea, and for good reason.



** Wolverine and related characters have another one that sprung up in the late 2000s, which tried to maintain some tension when Wolverine can heal from pretty much anything -- Wolverine, and by extension Sabretooth, Daken, X-23 and everyone else in that "family" of characters, will die from drowning. The explanation is that, if their brains are cut off from oxygen long enough, they die like anyone else, which also explains why beheading would kill them. Okay, so... how about just shooting their lungs into oblivion so by the time they regenerate, the brain is dead? How about an explosion that destroys the lungs and airways? How about brain damage that stops the body from breathing? How about all those times the characters ''are'' functionally dead and walk it off? Basically this means you could kill one of these guys the same as any of person as long as your method involves depriving the person of air or fucking up their lungs bad enough. The comics have largely ignored these possibilities and maintained the whole "beheading or drowning is the only way" idea.

to:

** Wolverine and related characters have another one that sprung up in the late 2000s, which tried to maintain some tension when Wolverine can heal from pretty much anything -- Wolverine, and by extension Sabretooth, Daken, X-23 ComicBook/{{Daken}}, ComicBook/{{X 23}} and everyone else in that "family" of characters, will die from drowning. The explanation is that, if their brains are cut off from oxygen long enough, they die like anyone else, which also explains why beheading would kill them. Okay, so... how about just shooting their lungs into oblivion so by the time they regenerate, the brain is dead? How about an explosion that destroys the lungs and airways? How about brain damage that stops the body from breathing? How about all those times the characters ''are'' functionally dead and walk it off? Basically this means you could kill one of these guys the same as any of other person as long as your method involves depriving the person of air or fucking up their lungs bad enough. The comics have largely ignored these possibilities and maintained the whole "beheading or drowning is the only way" idea.



** If Tsali is so powerful, why didn't he just kill Sonic and his friends in the very first chapter? [[spoiler:It's because Maledict was monitoring him and ordering him not to]]. But this turns into a plot hole because Tsali can still resist and defy Maledict - which exactly what he does later as they animosity between them grows. Downplayed later on, as it's revealed that Tsali is terrified of pissing off Satan (and [[DoNotTauntCthulhu for good reason]]) and [[spoiler:when he ignores Maledict and decides to attack the Blue Typhoon in Episode 73]], he fully expects to be harshly punished for it... but he decides [[AxCrazy killing Cosmo and Sonic is worth it]] and doesn't care anymore.

to:

** If Tsali is so powerful, why didn't he just kill Sonic and his friends in the very first chapter? [[spoiler:It's because Maledict was monitoring him and ordering him not to]]. to.]] But this turns into a plot hole because Tsali can still resist and defy Maledict - which exactly what he does later as they animosity between them grows. Downplayed later on, as it's revealed that Tsali is terrified of pissing off Satan (and [[DoNotTauntCthulhu for good reason]]) and [[spoiler:when he ignores Maledict and decides to attack the Blue Typhoon in Episode 73]], he fully expects to be harshly punished for it... but he decides [[AxCrazy killing Cosmo and Sonic is worth it]] and doesn't care anymore.



-->'''WebVideo/NostalgiaCritic:''' Why the fuck did we have a different dimension in this movie?! Why couldn't Felix just be in Oriana, the strange world? He's already strange; he's a talking cat! It's not like the real world meets something odd and whimsical. IT'S WEIRD-ASS SHIT MEETING WEIRD-ASS SHIT! So this plot point has no purpose! It's just wasting time, something you'll find this movie is very, very good at!

to:

-->'''WebVideo/NostalgiaCritic:''' -->'''WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic:''' Why the fuck did we have a different dimension in this movie?! Why couldn't Felix just be in Oriana, the strange world? He's already strange; he's a talking cat! It's not like the real world meets something odd and whimsical. IT'S WEIRD-ASS SHIT MEETING WEIRD-ASS SHIT! So this plot point has no purpose! It's just wasting time, something you'll find this movie is very, very good at!



* The first ''Literature/{{Goosebumps}}'' book ''Welcome To Dead House'' has a pretty big one: [[spoiler:the whole town consists of undead, who are [[WeakenedByTheLight destroyed by sunlight]]; at the end Amanda manages to push a tree down and expose them to sunlight, which destroys them. Apparently they were [[TorturedMonster tormented by their existence]] and thank Amanda for releasing them from their torment. While it does make for a bit of a TearJerker it also makes you wonder why the hell they didn't just walk into the sunlight themselves a long time ago. You could {{handwave}} it by saying they have some religious prohibition against suicide, however, that doesn't really fly when you consider that it's not really suicide since they're ''already dead'']].



* ''Literature/{{Goosebumps}}'' The first book ''Welcome To Dead House'' has a pretty big one: [[spoiler:the whole town consists of undead, who are [[WeakenedByTheLight destroyed by sunlight]]; at the end Amanda manages to push a tree down and expose them to sunlight, which destroys them. Apparently they were [[TorturedMonster tormented by their existence]] and thank Amanda for releasing them from their torment. While it does make for a bit of a TearJerker it also makes you wonder why the hell they didn't just walk into the sunlight themselves a long time ago. You could {{handwave}} it by saying they have some religious prohibition against suicide, however, that doesn't really fly when you consider that it's not really suicide since they're ''already dead'']].

to:

* ''Literature/{{Goosebumps}}'' In ''[[Literature/TowerAndTheHive The Rowan]]'', it was assumed that "Prime Travel Sickness" -- chronically severe vertigo caused by interplanetary teleportation -- was simply part of [[BlessedWithSuck being a Prime]], the strongest level of psychic talent. The appearance of [[UnskilledButStrong wild talent]] [[TheAce Jeff Raven]], who could teleport between worlds with no ill effects, caused further investigation. It was uncovered that "Travel Sickness" was the result of Prime Siglen imprinting her own condition (an inner-ear defect that produced said severe vertigo) on her peers and protégés -- ''i.e.'', every other Prime that wasn't Raven. But there was explicitly three centuries between ''The Rowan'' and its prequel ''Pegasus in Flight''. In that time period, either Siglen and her peers are the first book ''Welcome To Dead House'' has a pretty big one: [[spoiler:the whole town consists generation of undead, who are [[WeakenedByTheLight destroyed by sunlight]]; at the end Amanda manages to push a tree down and expose them to sunlight, which destroys them. Apparently they were [[TorturedMonster tormented by their existence]] and thank Amanda for releasing them from their torment. While it does make for a bit of a TearJerker it also makes you wonder why the hell they didn't just walk into the sunlight themselves a long time ago. You could {{handwave}} it by saying they have some religious prohibition against suicide, however, Primes, no Prime-level psychic talent attempted interplanetary travel via teleportation, or no one noticed that doesn't really fly when you consider that it's not really suicide since they're ''already dead'']]."Travel Sickness" wasn't a big deal until Siglen made it so. All of these are equally unlikely.



* In ''[[Literature/TowerAndTheHive The Rowan]]'', it was assumed that "Prime Travel Sickness" -- chronically severe vertigo caused by interplanetary teleportation -- was simply part of [[BlessedWithSuck being a Prime]], the strongest level of psychic talent. The appearance of [[UnskilledButStrong wild talent]] [[TheAce Jeff Raven]], who could teleport between worlds with no ill effects, caused further investigation. It was uncovered that "Travel Sickness" was the result of Prime Siglen imprinting her own condition (an inner-ear defect that produced said severe vertigo) on her peers and protégés -- ''i.e.'', every other Prime that wasn't Raven. But there was explicitly three centuries between ''The Rowan'' and its prequel ''Pegasus in Flight''. In that time period, either Siglen and her peers are the first generation of Primes, no Prime-level psychic talent attempted interplanetary travel via teleportation, or no one noticed that "Travel Sickness" wasn't a big deal until Siglen made it so. All of these are equally unlikely.



* One of the explanations in mythology/folklore for vampire's MissingReflection is that they have no souls. The problem with this is neither do ''all the various inanimate objects in the room which still show up in mirrors''. The second (much more logical) explanation is that mirrors are made using silver and silver is considered a really "pure" metal so it won't hold the vampire's reflection, (for similar reasons as to why the SilverBullet trope exists). Similarly, this might also explain the "Vampires don't appear in photography" concept. Early film used silver particles.

to:

* One of the explanations in mythology/folklore for vampire's [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampire]]'s MissingReflection is that they have no souls. The problem with this is neither do ''all the various inanimate objects in the room which still show up in mirrors''. The second (much more logical) explanation is that mirrors are made using silver and silver is considered a really "pure" metal so it won't hold the vampire's reflection, (for similar reasons as to why the SilverBullet trope exists). Similarly, this might also explain the "Vampires don't appear in photography" concept. Early film used silver particles.



* ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms''
** Starting with 3rd edition, there has been the infamous Wall Of The Faithless, which is basically a giant wall around Kelemvor's (the god of death's) realm were people who didn't worship any god(s) in life have their souls trapped and [[FateWorseThanDeath slowly disintegrated]] until they [[CessationOfExistence simply cease to exist]]. At first there was no explanation for why the Wall existed, but when the writers realized that the Wall made Kelemvor (Who is inteded to be LawfulNeutral) seem like a [[JerkassGods massive asshole]], they decided that the Wall was made by the previous death god Myrkul (who was evil) and Kelemvor wanted to remove it and just reward or punish unbelievers based on their deeds in life. Unfortunately, this made enough stop worshipping gods (who [[GodsNeedPrayerBadly need worship to survive]]) that he had to put it back in place. The problems with this explanation are two-fold: 1. Getting a good afterlife isn't the only reason people worship gods in the Realms, as they provide other benefits such as giving their clerics magic powers (among other things) and. 2. It still makes Kelemvor look bad, as it raises the question of why he can't just make the souls of non-belivers [[CessationOfExistence cease to exist]], as that seems far less cruel (and happens anyway after the Wall is done with them.)

to:

* ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms''
''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'':
** Starting with 3rd edition, there has been the infamous Wall Of The Faithless, which is basically a giant wall around Kelemvor's (the god of death's) realm were people who didn't worship any god(s) in life have their souls trapped and [[FateWorseThanDeath slowly disintegrated]] until they [[CessationOfExistence simply cease to exist]]. At first there was no explanation for why the Wall existed, but when the writers realized that the Wall made Kelemvor (Who is inteded to be LawfulNeutral) seem like a [[JerkassGods massive asshole]], they decided that the Wall was made by the previous death god Myrkul (who was evil) and Kelemvor wanted to remove it and just reward or punish unbelievers based on their deeds in life. Unfortunately, this made enough stop worshipping gods (who [[GodsNeedPrayerBadly need worship to survive]]) that he had to put it back in place. The problems with this explanation are two-fold: 1. Getting a good afterlife isn't the only reason people worship gods in the Realms, as they provide other benefits such as giving their clerics magic powers (among other things) and. 2. It still makes Kelemvor look bad, as it raises the question of why he can't just make the souls of non-belivers non-believers [[CessationOfExistence cease to exist]], as that seems far less cruel (and happens anyway after the Wall is done with them.)



** In the first game, the enemies all had names that were designed to make it easy to tell what their role was. Grunts were TheGoomba, Elites were a EliteMook, Jackals were less named for their combat role but their appearance and laugh, and the Hunter was a BossInMookClothes. It was justified in game by the fact that these names were what humanity called the Covenant, but in ''VideoGame/Halo2'', the Covenant say these names like its what they actually are. Later lore would provide names to the races of the Covenant, but its something that doesn't make sense at all and never gets addressed.

to:

** In the first game, the enemies all had names that were designed to make it easy to tell what their role was. Grunts were TheGoomba, Elites were a EliteMook, {{Elite Mook|s}}, Jackals were less named for their combat role but their appearance and laugh, and the Hunter was a BossInMookClothes. It was justified in game by the fact that these names were what humanity called the Covenant, but in ''VideoGame/Halo2'', the Covenant say these names like its what they actually are. Later lore would provide names to the races of the Covenant, but its something that doesn't make sense at all and never gets addressed.



* ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClankFutureToolsOfDestruction'' introduced the idea that Ratchet's race, Lombaxes, were functionally extinct, and Ratchet was the LastOfHisKind. Many fans pointed out that this didn't make sense, because ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClankGoingCommando'' had featured what appeared a different Lombax, Angela, without any implication that she and Ratchet were the last of their species. ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClankFutureACrackInTime'' decided to patch this by having a pair of radio announcers acknowledge that Angela exists and is indeed a Lombax. However, one of the main reasons given in ''Tools'' to prove Ratchet was the last one was that he'd never seen another one, a claim he didn't contest. Prior to this, one could maybe assume that this meant the ''Future'' trilogy was a SoftReboot and [[RetGone Angela didn't actually exist in its continuity]], but now she does, so the whole thing no longer works.

to:

* ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClankFutureToolsOfDestruction'' introduced the idea that Ratchet's race, Lombaxes, were functionally extinct, and Ratchet was the LastOfHisKind. Many fans pointed out that this didn't make sense, because ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClankGoingCommando'' had seemingly featured what appeared a different Lombax, Angela, without any implication that she and Ratchet were the last of their species. ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClankFutureACrackInTime'' decided to patch this by having a pair of radio announcers acknowledge that Angela exists and is indeed a Lombax. However, one of the main reasons given in ''Tools'' to prove Ratchet was the last one was that he'd never seen another one, a claim he didn't contest. Prior to this, one could maybe assume that this meant the ''Future'' trilogy was a SoftReboot and [[RetGone Angela didn't actually exist in its continuity]], but now she does, so the whole thing no longer works.



* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'':
** [[WordOfGod Word Of God]]'s explanation for why humans appear in some ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' games and not others is that the cast can freely jump between a WorldOfFunnyAnimals and a human world. Not only is such a thing never hinted at in the games [[note]] ''Anime/SonicX'' had Sonic and the rest being from another world but was an AlternateContinuity where their [[TrappedInAnotherWorld inability to return home]] was a major plot point and nearly brought about TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt.[[/note]], it flat-out contradicts multiple games and characters' backstories [[note]] to the point the aforementioned ''Anime/SonicX'' had to do serious rewrites when adapting them into its "two worlds" scenario[[/note]]. Some of the most notable examples being: ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' (Angel Island and the ruins of an echidna temple are a short train ride away from a human populated city), [[note]] This alone would infer that humans and funny animals have coexisted [[AlternateHistory in some]] [[AfterTheEnd capacity]] [[Comicbook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog for 700+ years]] [[/note]] ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'' (Shadow was created by human scientists decades before Sonic was born, [[note]] Also for some reason, he shares many of Sonic's chaos abilities including teleportation and a super form, as if though there should be some sort of connection between them. [[/note]] Rouge is a spy for the human military organization GUN who's high ranking enough to be in direct contact with the President of the [[EagleLand United]] [[FantasyCounterpartCulture Federation]], and Professor Gerald based the core of the ARK on the Master Emerald's shrine), ''VideoGame/SonicBattle'' (Sonic, Tails, Amy, and Rouge live in or around Central City, the capital of the United Federation), ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'' (Silver lives in the BadFuture of the human populated Soleanna), and ''VideoGame/SonicRidersZeroGravity'' (GUN is stated to be investigating rampaging security robots, which are controlled by a master computer near the ancestral home of the avian Babylon Rogues). Making matters worse there wasn't technically a PlotHole which needed fixing. [[BrokenBase Some fans]] were upset by ''Sonic Adventure'''s introduction of human [=NPCs=] (other than [[BigBad Eggman]]) into what they had imagined to be a WorldOfFunnyAnimals ([[MyFriendsAndZoidberg and Eggman]]), or at least wanted to see some more FunnyAnimal [=NPCs=] mixed in, but {{fanon}} had long since handwaved their absence with the more palatable explanation that [[FantasyWorldMap humans and ''Funny Animal'' communities are geographically isolated]] and Funny Animals living alongside humans (and vice-versa) are a minority. Finally, there's no explanation for why when Sonic is held prisoner for six months in ''VideoGame/SonicForces'' he doesn't simply use his dimension switching power to escape, not even a throwaway line about how Infinite or Eggman have some kind of device/power that keeps him stuck in that dimension.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'':
In ''[[Creator/ZapDramatic Sir Basil Pike Public School]]'', the game only spans three days. WordOfGod is that it's the last week of school, but this doesn't make a whole lot of sense for a few reasons:
** A BigGame subplot is introduced (and poorly resolved just as quickly). School sports seasons typically end a few weeks before the last week.
** No one alludes to it being the last week of school, which would obviously be a pretty big deal for schoolchildren and warrant at least one mention.
** Both Ted and Ms. Pruet teach their classes. During the last week or two of school, teachers typically allow students to use the classes as extended study halls. Additionally, Ms. Pruet gives an assignment to Tammy and Tariq on what is supposed to be the last day of school.
* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'':
** [[WordOfGod Word Of God]]'s explanation for why humans appear in some ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' games and not others is that the cast can freely jump between a WorldOfFunnyAnimals and a human world. Not only is such a thing never hinted at in the games [[note]] ''Anime/SonicX'' had Sonic and the rest being from another world but was an AlternateContinuity where their [[TrappedInAnotherWorld inability to return home]] was a major plot point and nearly brought about TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt.[[/note]], it flat-out contradicts multiple games and characters' backstories [[note]] to the point the aforementioned ''Anime/SonicX'' had to do serious rewrites when adapting them into its "two worlds" scenario[[/note]]. Some of the most notable examples being: ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' (Angel Island and the ruins of an echidna temple are a short train ride away from a human populated city), [[note]] This alone would infer that humans and funny animals have coexisted [[AlternateHistory in some]] [[AfterTheEnd capacity]] [[Comicbook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog for 700+ years]] [[/note]] ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'' (Shadow was created by human scientists decades before Sonic was born, [[note]] Also for some reason, he shares many of Sonic's chaos abilities including teleportation and a super form, as if though there should be some sort of connection between them. [[/note]] Rouge is a spy for the human military organization GUN who's high ranking enough to be in direct contact with the President of the [[EagleLand United]] [[FantasyCounterpartCulture Federation]], and Professor Gerald based the core of the ARK on the Master Emerald's shrine), ''VideoGame/SonicBattle'' (Sonic, Tails, Amy, and Rouge live in or around Central City, the capital of the United Federation), ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'' (Silver lives in the BadFuture of the human populated Soleanna), and ''VideoGame/SonicRidersZeroGravity'' (GUN is stated to be investigating rampaging security robots, which are controlled by a master computer near the ancestral home of the avian Babylon Rogues). Making matters worse there wasn't technically a PlotHole which needed fixing. [[BrokenBase Some fans]] were upset by ''Sonic Adventure'''s introduction of human [=NPCs=] (other than [[BigBad Eggman]]) into what they had imagined to be a WorldOfFunnyAnimals ([[MyFriendsAndZoidberg and Eggman]]), or at least wanted to see some more FunnyAnimal [=NPCs=] mixed in, but {{fanon}} had long since handwaved their absence with the more palatable explanation that [[FantasyWorldMap humans and ''Funny Animal'' communities are geographically isolated]] and Funny Animals living alongside humans (and vice-versa) are a minority. Finally, there's no explanation for why when Sonic is held prisoner for six months in ''VideoGame/SonicForces'' he doesn't simply use his dimension switching power to escape, not even a throwaway line about how Infinite or Eggman have some kind of device/power that keeps him stuck in that dimension.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Superman 64}}'', the horrific draw distance is [[SerendipityWritesThePlot explained]] by "Kryptonite fog". However, this raises the question of how Franchise/{{Superman}} is able to breathe, let alone fly. This might qualify as a double Voodoo Shark as it was already established that Superman is trapped in Luthor's virtual reality simulator, meaning they could just claim Luthor deleberately made it harder to see when he programmed it. There was one comic where Kryptonite was released into the atmosphere and Earth itself was uninhabitable by Kryptonians (it was solved by self-replicating nanites, don't worry), and the level of Kryptonite in the atmosphere was at ''lethal levels'' for Kryptonians... and yet, you could still see through the atmosphere fine. Perhaps slightly green-tinged, but still fine. If Kryptonite fog was thick enough to not see through, Superman wouldn't just have trouble ''flying,'' there is a serious question of how he would be able to survive ''that much'' Kryptonite radiation, even from ''orbit.''

to:

* In ''VideoGame/{{Superman 64}}'', the horrific draw distance is [[SerendipityWritesThePlot explained]] by "Kryptonite fog". However, this raises the question of how Franchise/{{Superman}} is able to breathe, let alone fly. This might qualify as a double Voodoo Shark as it was already established that Superman is trapped in Luthor's virtual reality simulator, meaning they could just claim Luthor deleberately deliberately made it harder to see when he programmed it. There was one comic where Kryptonite was released into the atmosphere and Earth itself was uninhabitable by Kryptonians (it was solved by self-replicating nanites, don't worry), and the level of Kryptonite in the atmosphere was at ''lethal levels'' for Kryptonians... and yet, you could still see through the atmosphere fine. Perhaps slightly green-tinged, but still fine. If Kryptonite fog was thick enough to not see through, Superman wouldn't just have trouble ''flying,'' there is a serious question of how he would be able to survive ''that much'' Kryptonite radiation, even from ''orbit.''



* In ''[[Creator/ZapDramatic Sir Basil Pike Public School]]'', the game only spans three days. WordOfGod is that it's the last week of school, but this doesn't make a whole lot of sense for a few reasons:
** A BigGame subplot is introduced (and poorly resolved just as quickly). School sports seasons typically end a few weeks before the last week.
** No one alludes to it being the last week of school, which would obviously be a pretty big deal for schoolchildren and warrant at least one mention.
** Both Ted and Ms. Pruet teach their classes. During the last week or two of school, teachers typically allow students to use the classes as extended study halls. Additionally, Ms. Pruet gives an assignment to Tammy and Tariq on what is supposed to be the last day of school.
* In ''VideoGame/ZombieDriver'', The Mayor pops up early in the story to tell you that he'll pay you for killing the
zombies that are destroying his city. The game neglects to mention who's giving you money ''when you destroy the city as well''.

to:

* In ''[[Creator/ZapDramatic Sir Basil Pike Public School]]'', the game only spans three days. WordOfGod is that it's the last week of school, but this doesn't make a whole lot of sense for a few reasons:
** A BigGame subplot is introduced (and poorly resolved just as quickly). School sports seasons typically end a few weeks before the last week.
** No one alludes to it being the last week of school, which would obviously be a pretty big deal for schoolchildren and warrant at least one mention.
** Both Ted and Ms. Pruet teach their classes. During the last week or two of school, teachers typically allow students to use the classes as extended study halls. Additionally, Ms. Pruet gives an assignment to Tammy and Tariq on what is supposed to be the last day of school.
* In ''VideoGame/ZombieDriver'', The Mayor pops up early in the story to tell you that he'll pay you for killing the
the zombies that are destroying his city. The game neglects to mention who's giving you money ''when you destroy the city as well''.



* PlayedForLaughs in ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FD7PB-6TWrg Ted Bear]]'', a parody of ''Series/ManVsWild'' from WebAnimation/CyanideAndHappiness. Host Ted Bear survives on a desert island by finding a "fruitfish" that produces natural fruit punch. He anticipates the audience's objection that there is no such thing as a fruitfish by admitting that it's actually a crustacean.

to:

* PlayedForLaughs in ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FD7PB-6TWrg Ted Bear]]'', a parody of ''Series/ManVsWild'' from WebAnimation/CyanideAndHappiness.''WebAnimation/TheCyanideAndHappinessShow''. Host Ted Bear survives on a desert island by finding a "fruitfish" that produces natural fruit punch. He anticipates the audience's objection that there is no such thing as a fruitfish by admitting that it's actually a crustacean.



** PlayedForLaughs and {{Lampshaded}} in [[http://www.terrorisland.net/strips/057.html one strip]].
-->'''Liln''': It's been a long time since you guys went shopping. Why haven't you starved to death yet?\\

to:

** PlayedForLaughs and {{Lampshaded}} {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in [[http://www.terrorisland.net/strips/057.html one strip]].
-->'''Liln''': --->'''Liln''': It's been a long time since you guys went shopping. Why haven't you starved to death yet?\\



** In “The former life of Brian”...
-->'''Stewie:''' Say, Brian, now that I think about it, how can you possibly have a thirteen-year-old son when you yourself are only seven?\\

to:

** In “The former life "The Former Life of Brian”...
-->'''Stewie:'''
Brian"...
--->'''Stewie:'''
Say, Brian, now that I think about it, how can you possibly have a thirteen-year-old son when you yourself are only seven?\\



-->'''Salty:''' The longer we stay here the more people'll question how a fisherman with no engineering background managed to [[ItMakesSenseInContext build a sophisticated talking fish robot]].

to:

-->'''Salty:''' --->'''Salty:''' The longer we stay here the more people'll question how a fisherman with no engineering background managed to [[ItMakesSenseInContext build a sophisticated talking fish robot]].



* Fans of ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' wanted to know what Dipper really thought of Pacifica. Literature/GravityFallsJournal3 at least implies he could have developed a crush on her, but it also has a mild case of this trope:
** The episode "Roadside Attraction" showed he was still obsessed with Wendy at the same time, and in said episode, why did Dipper flirt with all these girls because he was desperate to be with anyone when he already had a new potential love interest? And why is this never addressed or alluded to during the rest of the series, even when Dipper and Pacifica depart in the last episode, when Dipper getting a girlfriend was a significant plot point in the series? This those issues could, to some extend, be [[HandWave explained]] by saying Dipper is simply in denial (he did cross those sentences out in the journal, after all) and that it's more than possible to be attracted to multiple people at once, but it still would have made more sense to simply not address it in Journal 3. Wouldn't it be easier to just have "Roadside Attraction" take place before "Northwest Mansion Mystery", especially as it was a BreatherEpisode with no plot relevance?
** Also in Journal 3, it's said that [=.GIFfany=] survived "Soos and the Real Girl" and went into Rumble [=McSkirmish's=] game. If that's true, why didn't she appear with him during Weirdmaggedon? We didn't see every character from his game then, but one does still wonder...

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'':
**
Fans of ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' wanted to know what Dipper really thought of Pacifica. Literature/GravityFallsJournal3 ''Literature/GravityFallsJournal3'' at least implies he could have developed a crush on her, but it also has a mild case of this trope:
**
trope: The episode "Roadside Attraction" showed he was still obsessed with Wendy at the same time, and in said episode, why did Dipper flirt with all these girls because he was desperate to be with anyone when he already had a new potential love interest? And why is this never addressed or alluded to during the rest of the series, even when Dipper and Pacifica depart in the last episode, when Dipper getting a girlfriend was a significant plot point in the series? This those These issues could, to some extend, extent, be [[HandWave explained]] by saying Dipper is simply in denial (he did cross those sentences out in the journal, after all) and that it's more than possible to be attracted to multiple people at once, but it still would have made more sense to simply not address it in Journal 3.''Journal 3''. Wouldn't it be easier to just have "Roadside Attraction" take place before "Northwest Mansion Mystery", especially as it was a BreatherEpisode with no plot relevance?
** Also in Journal 3, ''Journal 3'', it's said that [=.GIFfany=] survived "Soos and the Real Girl" and went into Rumble [=McSkirmish's=] game. If that's true, why didn't she appear with him during Weirdmaggedon? We didn't see every character from his game then, but one does still wonder...



** The episode featuring a guest appearance by Ray Romano (as "Ray Magini") centers around all the other characters thinking Ray is made-up, and Homer getting increasingly defensive about the existence of his new friend. In the end, after Ray's existence is revealed to everyone, it's explained (by Stephen Hawking, no less) that one of the reasons Bart was not able to see him in an earlier scene, despite standing right beside him, was because a reality-warping wormhole had spontaneously opened up in front of Ray. The audience is clearly being trolled at this point, since that same scene featured Bart was holding a giant pile of stuff that could have easily been used as an explanation for his blocked line of sight.

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** The episode featuring a guest appearance by Ray Romano Creator/RayRomano (as "Ray Magini") centers around all the other characters thinking Ray is made-up, and Homer getting increasingly defensive about the existence of his new friend. In the end, after Ray's existence is revealed to everyone, it's explained (by Stephen Hawking, Creator/StephenHawking, no less) that one of the reasons Bart was not able to see him in an earlier scene, despite standing right beside him, was because a reality-warping wormhole had spontaneously opened up in front of Ray. The audience is clearly being trolled at this point, since that same scene featured Bart was holding a giant pile of stuff that could have easily been used as an explanation for his blocked line of sight.



** Played for laughs in the Franchise/ScoobyDoo AffectionateParody episode, "Korn's Groovy Pirate Mystery". At the very end, when Korn is going through the process of DoingInTheWizard to explain the presence of the pirate ghosts, the methods turn out to be complete nonsense. The ghosts were created using a flashlight and cotton swabs, and a GhostShip was made using a mirror, a candle, and two squirrels.
** In the Imaginationland three-parter, a subplot explaining how the terrorists gained access to the gateway to Imaginationland (they stole it from the Russians, who planned an attack in our imagination back during the cold war) was cut because it raised more questions than it answered.

to:

** Played for laughs in the Franchise/ScoobyDoo ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' AffectionateParody episode, "Korn's Groovy Pirate Mystery". At the very end, when Korn is going through the process of DoingInTheWizard to explain the presence of the pirate ghosts, the methods turn out to be complete nonsense. The ghosts were created using a flashlight and cotton swabs, and a GhostShip was made using a mirror, a candle, and two squirrels.
** In the Imaginationland three-parter, a subplot explaining how the terrorists gained access to the gateway to Imaginationland (they stole it from the Russians, who planned an attack in our imagination back during the cold war) Cold War) was cut because it raised more questions than it answered.

Added DiffLines:

** In "How Hermes Requisitioned His Groove Back", Morgan asks Fry why he has a cap full of yogurt in his locker. He replies that it used to be milk, but it expired because, as he puts it, "time makes fools of us all". This of course raises the question of why he had a cap full of milk.


* In ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'', starting with 3rd edition, there has been the infamous Wall Of The Faithless, which is basically a giant wall around Kelemvor's (the god of death's) realm were people who didn't worship any god(s) in life have their souls trapped and [[FateWorseThanDeath slowly disintegrated]] until they [[CessationOfExistence simply cease to exist]]. At first there was no explanation for why the Wall existed, but when the writers realized that the Wall made Kelemvor (Who is inteded to be LawfulNeutral) seem like a [[JerkassGods massive asshole]], they decided that the Wall was made by the previous death god Myrkul (who was evil) and Kelemvor wanted to remove it and just reward or punish unbelievers based on their deeds in life. Unfortunately, this made enough stop worshipping gods (who [[GodsNeedPrayerBadly need worship to survive]]) that he had to put it back in place. The problems with this explanation are two-fold: 1. Getting a good afterlife isn't the only reason people worship gods in the Realms, as they provide other benefits such as giving their clerics magic powers (among other things) and. 2. It still makes Kelemvor look bad, as it raises the question of why he can't just make the souls of unbelivers [[CessationOfExistence cease to exist]], as that seems far less cruel (and happens anyway after the Wall is done with them.)

to:

* In ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'', starting ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms''
** Starting
with 3rd edition, there has been the infamous Wall Of The Faithless, which is basically a giant wall around Kelemvor's (the god of death's) realm were people who didn't worship any god(s) in life have their souls trapped and [[FateWorseThanDeath slowly disintegrated]] until they [[CessationOfExistence simply cease to exist]]. At first there was no explanation for why the Wall existed, but when the writers realized that the Wall made Kelemvor (Who is inteded to be LawfulNeutral) seem like a [[JerkassGods massive asshole]], they decided that the Wall was made by the previous death god Myrkul (who was evil) and Kelemvor wanted to remove it and just reward or punish unbelievers based on their deeds in life. Unfortunately, this made enough stop worshipping gods (who [[GodsNeedPrayerBadly need worship to survive]]) that he had to put it back in place. The problems with this explanation are two-fold: 1. Getting a good afterlife isn't the only reason people worship gods in the Realms, as they provide other benefits such as giving their clerics magic powers (among other things) and. 2. It still makes Kelemvor look bad, as it raises the question of why he can't just make the souls of unbelivers non-belivers [[CessationOfExistence cease to exist]], as that seems far less cruel (and happens anyway after the Wall is done with them.))
** The official lore for 5th edition states that when Ao remade the Tables of Fate and separate Abeir and Toril, the effects of the first sundering from many years in the past, "flowed through time" and caused a second sundering. This is why so much of the ''Forgotten Realms'' lore changed heavily as a result. This raises a lot of questions about why ''only'' this event happened. The first sundering happened for completely unrelated reasons and Ao had no direct hand in it, so how could its effects "link up" to the cause the second, especially with Ao doing something that in theory is supposed to bring stability to the land instead of harm. Also, why is it that this event was able to flow "forwards in time"? Other events in the past have never had such an effect as far as officially, so it doesn't make sense for it to be that unique. The other is that it raises a question on how time works in the Forgotten Realms, as it implies that said event somehow affected the future tangible instead of simply being an event in the past that already happened. If that is the case, than why hasn't other events like the Time of Troubles or Spellplague have similar effects that caused events many years later to have similar issues?


** An example specific to one monster: Time elementals (which first appeared in 1st edtion but were later converted to 3rd edition in the third party book ''Tome Of Horrors'') cause wounds that never heal naturally and [[DeaderThanDead harder to bring a victim back from the dead.]] The in-game explanation is that their attacks cause "cell death", the problem being that a lot of [[DamageTyping damage sources]] (such as freezing cold or electricity) also cause cell death (in real life, at least), but aren't any harder to heal than normal.

to:

** An example specific to one monster: Time elementals (which first appeared in 1st edtion but were later converted to 3rd edition in the third party book ''Tome Of Horrors'') cause wounds that never heal naturally and [[DeaderThanDead make it harder to bring a victim back from the dead.]] The in-game explanation is that their attacks cause "cell death", the problem being that a lot of [[DamageTyping damage sources]] (such as freezing cold or electricity) also cause cell death (in real life, at least), but aren't any harder to heal than normal.

Added DiffLines:

** An example specific to one monster: Time elementals (which first appeared in 1st edtion but were later converted to 3rd edition in the third party book ''Tome Of Horrors'') cause wounds that never heal naturally and [[DeaderThanDead harder to bring a victim back from the dead.]] The in-game explanation is that their attacks cause "cell death", the problem being that a lot of [[DamageTyping damage sources]] (such as freezing cold or electricity) also cause cell death (in real life, at least), but aren't any harder to heal than normal.


** In the original series, it was stated that bending was learned from various interactions between mankind and nature, and that humans developed bending from these interactions (fire bending from the Dragons, earth bending from the badger-moles, water bending from watching the moons effect on the tide, and air bending from the Sky-Bison). ''Korra'' would later provide an origin story for the Avatar, and as a side effect of this also explain the origins of bending: originally mankind lived on the backs of Lion-Turtles, and were gifted bending by the Lion-Turtles for hunting and would take it away if need be. Likely aware of this trope being a problem, the writers had the Lion-Turtles leave after a certain point in this time period and even show Wan practicing his fire bending with Dragons, but this not only retcons the original explanation, but raises many questions about bending and the Lion-Turtles. How did the Lion-Turtles have bending, and why could they gift it to people? How can each one have different elements? Does this mean that creatures like Dragons were gifted it by them as well? Furthermore, if the original origin stories are still true, then how could tales of their original bending skills have been so lost that people thought they learned it other beings, especially with bending being hereditary as well. Plus, where does energy bending fit into this? It is still possible for the original stories to be true since with the Lion-Turtles gone, mankind would need to learn it somehow, but it doesn't account for how said fact would be lost over time.


** A controversial one came about near the end of Warlords of Draenor. WordOfGod explained that the Archimonde we fight at the end of the expansion is the same one we killed in ''Warcraft III''. To explain how he's back, and why he's in an alternate timeline, we were given the explanation that demon souls regenerate in their home plane and transcend all realities. This immediately led to a huge ton of questions about how pretty much any past encounter with the demons made sense. For one, if the same demons have to move between all timelines, that implies that they go through every timeline in order to repeat their actions exactly in any timeline where those actions were not a PointOfDivergence. For another, many demons, Archimonde included, were not born as such, and were corrupted, so what happens to all of the other Archimondes in any number of infinite timelines who also get corrupted into demons? Also, while this was seemingly meant to make the Legion feel like more of an insurmountable threat, it only made it seem like we'd done a good job forcing them to respawn in just a single timeline, let alone all the others out there that could theoretically become our allies. It should be noted that neither of these things have been referenced much in game (and sometimes they're seemingly contradicted, like Velen being forced to kill [[spoiler:his demon-corrupted son]] being seen as a tragic end, instead of just a matter of time before he'll respawn and get another chance at redemption). It also raises the question of why any demons stay in the Twisting Nether i.e the one place they can be KilledOffForReal, rather than getting to another plane as soon as possible. Finally, Archimonde and Mannoroth both died on Azeroth in the third game. Why didn't ''they'' respawn?

to:

** A controversial one came about near the end of Warlords of Draenor. WordOfGod explained that the Archimonde we fight at the end of the expansion is the same one we killed in ''Warcraft III''. To explain how he's back, and why he's in an alternate timeline, we were given the explanation that demon souls regenerate in their home plane and transcend all realities. This immediately led to a huge ton of questions about how pretty much any past encounter with the demons made sense. For one, if the same demons have to move between all timelines, that implies that they go through every timeline in order to repeat their actions exactly in any timeline where those actions were not a PointOfDivergence. For another, many demons, Archimonde included, were not born as such, and were corrupted, so what happens to all of the other Archimondes in any number of infinite timelines who also get corrupted into demons? Also, while this was seemingly meant to make the Legion feel like more of an insurmountable threat, it only made it seem like we'd done a good job forcing them to respawn in just a single timeline, let alone all the others out there that could theoretically become our allies. It should be noted that neither of these things have been referenced much in game (and sometimes they're seemingly contradicted, like Velen being forced to kill [[spoiler:his demon-corrupted son]] being seen as a tragic end, instead of just a matter of time before he'll respawn and get another chance at redemption). It also raises the question of why any demons stay in the Twisting Nether i.e the one place they can be KilledOffForReal, rather than getting to another plane as soon as possible. Finally, Archimonde and Mannoroth both died on Azeroth in the third game. Why didn't ''they'' respawn?game, but while Achimonde would later return in ''Warlords of Draenor'', Mannoroth never returns despite the fact all his deaths occur in ways that would let him return, which raises questions of why select demons seem to be able to respawn but some just vanish for good.


** A controversial one came about near the end of Warlords of Draenor. WordOfGod explained that the Archimonde we fight at the end of the expansion is the same one we killed in ''Warcraft III''. To explain how he's back, and why he's in an alternate timeline, we were given the explanation that demon souls regenerate in their home plane and transcend all realities. This immediately led to a huge ton of questions about how pretty much any past encounter with the demons made sense. For one, if the same demons have to move between all timelines, that implies that they go through every timeline in order to repeat their actions exactly in any timeline where those actions were not a PointOfDivergence. For another, many demons, Archimonde included, were not born as such, and were corrupted, so what happens to all of the other Archimondes in any number of infinite timelines who also get corrupted into demons? Also, while this was seemingly meant to make the Legion feel like more of an insurmountable threat, it only made it seem like we'd done a good job forcing them to respawn in just a single timeline, let alone all the others out there that could theoretically become our allies. It should be noted that neither of these things have been referenced much in game (and sometimes they're seemingly contradicted, like Velen being forced to kill [[spoiler:his demon-corrupted son]] being seen as a tragic end, instead of just a matter of time before he'll respawn and get another chance at redemption). It also raises the question of why any demons stay in the Twisting Nether i.e the one place they can be KilledOffForReal, rather than getting to another plane as soon as possible.

to:

** A controversial one came about near the end of Warlords of Draenor. WordOfGod explained that the Archimonde we fight at the end of the expansion is the same one we killed in ''Warcraft III''. To explain how he's back, and why he's in an alternate timeline, we were given the explanation that demon souls regenerate in their home plane and transcend all realities. This immediately led to a huge ton of questions about how pretty much any past encounter with the demons made sense. For one, if the same demons have to move between all timelines, that implies that they go through every timeline in order to repeat their actions exactly in any timeline where those actions were not a PointOfDivergence. For another, many demons, Archimonde included, were not born as such, and were corrupted, so what happens to all of the other Archimondes in any number of infinite timelines who also get corrupted into demons? Also, while this was seemingly meant to make the Legion feel like more of an insurmountable threat, it only made it seem like we'd done a good job forcing them to respawn in just a single timeline, let alone all the others out there that could theoretically become our allies. It should be noted that neither of these things have been referenced much in game (and sometimes they're seemingly contradicted, like Velen being forced to kill [[spoiler:his demon-corrupted son]] being seen as a tragic end, instead of just a matter of time before he'll respawn and get another chance at redemption). It also raises the question of why any demons stay in the Twisting Nether i.e the one place they can be KilledOffForReal, rather than getting to another plane as soon as possible. Finally, Archimonde and Mannoroth both died on Azeroth in the third game. Why didn't ''they'' respawn?


* ''VideoGame/MortalKombatX'' introduced a new character named D'Vorah, a member of a bug race called [[TheWormThatWalks Kytinn]], as an agent of Kotal Khan, and later TheMole for Shinnok. In an attempt to justify her importance and existence, the developers made a chapter focusing on Raiden where during a flashback to the events of ''VideoGame/MortalKombat2'', it is revealed D'Vorah was at the events of that game, even fighting Raiden before leaving. This presented several issues about her status as [[RememberTheNewGuy character that was there all along]], most of which being why she never was involved with the tournament despite her supposed importance as a warrior of Shao Khan. Other issues arose with her when ''VideoGame/MortalKombat11'' attempted to justify her existence further with statements like her being responsible for killing Jerrod, the king of Edenia and Kitana's father. These once again raised many questions that neither game tried to explain. Why was she not part of any of the tournaments despite her allegiance at the time, nor her lack of appearance in any other major events. Why would Shao Khan have a random bug woman kill the king of the place he was invading, especially when it had been established Khan had been the one to kill him? How come Raiden wouldn't find it strange that Shao Khan had a powerful bug like ally on his side who vanished for years only to suddenly reappear? These issues have resulted in the character becoming quite polarizing by the fans.

to:

* ''Franchise/MortalKombat'':
**
''VideoGame/MortalKombatX'' introduced a new character named D'Vorah, a member of a bug race called [[TheWormThatWalks Kytinn]], as an agent of Kotal Khan, and later TheMole for Shinnok. In an attempt to justify her importance and existence, the developers made a chapter focusing on Raiden where during a flashback to the events of ''VideoGame/MortalKombat2'', it is revealed D'Vorah was at the events of that game, even fighting Raiden before leaving. This presented several issues about her status as [[RememberTheNewGuy character that was there all along]], most of which being why she never was involved with the tournament despite her supposed importance as a warrior of Shao Khan. Other issues arose with her when ''VideoGame/MortalKombat11'' attempted to justify her existence further with statements like her being responsible for killing Jerrod, the king of Edenia and Kitana's father. These once again raised many questions that neither game tried to explain. Why was she not part of any of the tournaments despite her allegiance at the time, nor her lack of appearance in any other major events. Why would Shao Khan have a random bug woman kill the king of the place he was invading, especially when it had been established Khan had been the one to kill him? How come Raiden wouldn't find it strange that Shao Khan had a powerful bug like ally on his side who vanished for years only to suddenly reappear? These issues have resulted in the character becoming quite polarizing by the fans.fans.
** ''VideoGame/MortalKombat11'' brought Sindel back as a playable character via DLC. Her pre-release bio however revealed she was being retconned into being an EvilAllAlong GoldDigger who helped Shao Khan kill her husband Jerrod and plunge the world of Edenia into being merged with Outworld, just so she could marry Shao Khan. In an attempt to explain this, the writers claimed that Sindel was killed by Quan Chi and her death was manipulated into coming across as suicide. However, none of these changes line up with the games that came before ''11'', or even with dialogue in ''11'' itself like Geras' intro with Kitana. For starters, Sindel's bio in ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9'' kept the same backstory as her original timeline, but with the inclusion of her death creating a barrier around Earthrealm that prevented Shao Khan from invading, something that was shown in said game as being real, hence why they needed the revived and undead Sindel to get around it. If her death was not suicide than, where did this barrier come from and why it was there? If Sindel really did get killed by Quan Chi, how could he cover it up so well that nobody thought it was odd a powerful and sadistic person like her would commit suicide? Beyond that, how could Kitana ever think her mother was loving and a good person if she never acted as such? Unless Sindel was that much of a liar that she treated Kitana well for her whole life so Kitana would never know, it doesn't line up with Kitana's memories of her, as we see Sindel openly dislike Kitana because she's too much like her father. Initially there was hope this was just her Revenant self being tricked, but the ''Aftermath'' DLC story released over a year after the game came out confirmed that the retcon real and not just a trick. According to the writers, they did this to avoid UnfortunateImplications, but in doing so fans agree her character was made even worse.


* In Myth/NorseMythology the god Tyr is permanently missing a hand due to the [[CanisMajor Fenris Wolf]] biting it off. The problem being: while Norse gods aren't omnipotent, they are still powerful enough to come BackFromTheDead and the like, so why he can't fix a (relatively) minor thing like a severed hand doesn't make sense. It could be that [[WildMassGuessing any wounds caused by the Fenris Wolf are somehow cursed and never heal]], but there's no sign of this in the myths (well, what remains of them and wasn't lost or politically retconned during Christianization).
* Myth/GreekMythology has a similar voodoo shark involving the god's injuries: Namely Hephaestus was rendered handicapped for life after he fell off Mount Olympus, whereas Zeus had is [[YourHeadAsplode head split open]] and Athena come out fully formed, only for his head to completely heal. Why Hephaestus' injuries never healed isn't explained. Granted, Zeus is the most powerful god but you'd think he could heal Hephaestus or something if that were the case.


** WordOfGod's explanation for what ghosts are: they're not dead people; they're beings from another dimension who have taken on the ''memories and appearances'' of dead people. Fan reaction to this proclamation was uniformly negative, with some believing it to be a cop-out attempt to appease the MoralGuardians, especially since it seems to contradict the show itself! Most notably, Poindexter, a DeliberatelyMonochrome ghost stuck in TheFifties. Because that's when he attended Casper High ''when he was alive.'' Makes for FridgeHorror when you realize his entire afterlife has been being brutally bullied for fifty years.

to:

** WordOfGod's explanation for what ghosts are: they're not dead people; they're beings from another dimension who have taken on the ''memories and appearances'' of dead people. Fan reaction to this proclamation was uniformly negative, with some believing it to be a cop-out attempt to appease the MoralGuardians, especially since it seems to contradict the show itself! Most notably, Poindexter, a DeliberatelyMonochrome ghost stuck in TheFifties. Because that's when he attended Casper High ''when he was alive.'' Makes for FridgeHorror when you realize his entire afterlife has been being brutally bullied for fifty years.

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