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* ''WesternAnimation/DespicableMe'' heavily implies (although never outright states) that Gru created the Minions, since we see a "blueprint" of a Minion in the background of a shot of Gru's lab. However, when it came time to do [[WesternAnimation/{{Minions}} a spinoff featuring the Minions,]] that was understandably too restrictive, so the Minions instead became creatures that existed since the dawn of time to serve evil. Of course, that leads to some very awkward questions - not least, [[StupidJetpackHitler did Hitler have Minions]]? So instead, the Minions became depressed after the defeat of UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte and hid in a cave for 150 years, conveniently avoiding the horrors of the 19th and 20th centuries until they pop out...er, at the height of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. An awkward handwave to deal with an awkward handwave, but probably [[Administrivia/TropesAreTools better than the alternative.]] Still leaves quite the InferredHolocaust on the Minions' hands, though.
** Another Voodoo Shark is that the ''Minions'' movie mentions the minions always follow the most evil creature they can. Seeing as Gru suffers heavy InUniverse VillainDecay starting from ''the first movie'', which only gets exacerbated in the second (at least in the first movie he was trying to commit an act of supervillainy. In [[WesternAnimation/DespicableMe2 the second]] he's actively working ''against'' villains), it makes one wonder why the Minions bother to keep following him at all instead of changing their allegiance to another, more competent villain. However, in [[WesternAnimation/DespicableMe3 the third movie,]] the Minions finally ditch Gru because they wish to be villains again. It doesn't stick.....but in the long run, [[spoiler:they go to work for his brother, Dru.]]

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* ''WesternAnimation/DespicableMe'' heavily implies (although never outright states) that Gru created the Minions, since we see a "blueprint" of a Minion in the background of a shot of Gru's lab. However, when it came time to do [[WesternAnimation/{{Minions}} a spinoff featuring the Minions,]] that was understandably too restrictive, so the Minions instead became creatures that existed since the dawn of time to serve evil. Of course, that leads to some very awkward questions - not least, [[StupidJetpackHitler did Hitler have Minions]]? So instead, the Minions became depressed after the defeat of UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte and hid in a cave for 150 years, conveniently avoiding the horrors of the 19th and 20th centuries until they pop out...out, er, at the height of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. An awkward handwave to deal with an awkward handwave, but probably [[Administrivia/TropesAreTools better than the alternative.]] Still leaves quite the InferredHolocaust on the Minions' hands, though.
** Another Voodoo Shark is that the ''Minions'' movie mentions the minions always follow the most evil creature they can. Seeing as Gru suffers heavy InUniverse VillainDecay starting from ''the first movie'', which only gets exacerbated in the second (at least in the first movie he was trying to commit an act of supervillainy. supervillainy by shrinking and stealing the Moon. In [[WesternAnimation/DespicableMe2 the second]] he's actively working ''against'' villains), villains like El Macho), it makes one wonder why the Minions bother to keep following him at all instead of changing their allegiance to another, more competent villain. However, in [[WesternAnimation/DespicableMe3 the third movie,]] the Minions finally ditch Gru because they wish to be villains again. It doesn't stick.....stick so they can help him defeat Balthazar Bratt, but in the long run, [[spoiler:they go to work for his brother, Dru.]]


Not related to JumpingTheShark or HollywoodVoodoo. Compare ScullySyndrome, where a character in-universe will concoct ridiculous explanations for things, and UnscientificScience, which similarly attempts to spackle over questionable science and technology the same way the Voodoo Shark does for plot points. Can often, but doees not have to, result in a RetroactiveIdiotBall if the new explanation given contradict an earlier (that may be unrelated) one. This may result in a FanDislikedExplanation.

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Not related to JumpingTheShark or HollywoodVoodoo. Compare ScullySyndrome, where a character in-universe will concoct ridiculous explanations for things, and UnscientificScience, which similarly attempts to spackle over questionable science and technology the same way the Voodoo Shark does for plot points. Can often, but doees does not have to, result in a RetroactiveIdiotBall if the new explanation given contradict contradicts an earlier (that may be (potentially unrelated) one. This may result in a FanDislikedExplanation.


Not related to JumpingTheShark or HollywoodVoodoo. Compare ScullySyndrome, where a character in-universe will concoct ridiculous explanations for things, and UnscientificScience, which similarly attempts to spackle over questionable science and technology the same way the Voodoo Shark does for plot points. ACan often, but doees not have to, result in a RetroactiveIdiotBall if the explanation given contradict an earlier one. This may result in a FanDislikedExplanation.

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Not related to JumpingTheShark or HollywoodVoodoo. Compare ScullySyndrome, where a character in-universe will concoct ridiculous explanations for things, and UnscientificScience, which similarly attempts to spackle over questionable science and technology the same way the Voodoo Shark does for plot points. ACan Can often, but doees not have to, result in a RetroactiveIdiotBall if the new explanation given contradict an earlier (that may be unrelated) one. This may result in a FanDislikedExplanation.


Not related to JumpingTheShark or HollywoodVoodoo. Compare ScullySyndrome, where a character in-universe will concoct ridiculous explanations for things, and UnscientificScience, which similarly attempts to spackle over questionable science and technology the same way the Voodoo Shark does for plot points. A Voodoo Shark is similar to but differs from a RetroactiveIdiotBall in that the latter has an explanation that makes sense when it is delivered but is contradicted/rendered senseless by later materials rather than being senseless from the start. This may result in a FanDislikedExplanation.

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Not related to JumpingTheShark or HollywoodVoodoo. Compare ScullySyndrome, where a character in-universe will concoct ridiculous explanations for things, and UnscientificScience, which similarly attempts to spackle over questionable science and technology the same way the Voodoo Shark does for plot points. A Voodoo Shark is similar to ACan often, but differs from doees not have to, result in a RetroactiveIdiotBall in that if the latter has an explanation that makes sense when it is delivered but is contradicted/rendered senseless by later materials rather than being senseless from the start.given contradict an earlier one. This may result in a FanDislikedExplanation.


Not related to JumpingTheShark or HollywoodVoodoo. Compare ScullySyndrome, where a character in-universe will concoct ridiculous explanations for things, and UnscientificScience, which similarly attempts to spackle over questionable science and technology the same way the Voodoo Shark does for plot points. This may result in a FanDislikedExplanation.

to:

Not related to JumpingTheShark or HollywoodVoodoo. Compare ScullySyndrome, where a character in-universe will concoct ridiculous explanations for things, and UnscientificScience, which similarly attempts to spackle over questionable science and technology the same way the Voodoo Shark does for plot points. A Voodoo Shark is similar to but differs from a RetroactiveIdiotBall in that the latter has an explanation that makes sense when it is delivered but is contradicted/rendered senseless by later materials rather than being senseless from the start. This may result in a FanDislikedExplanation.

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** The finale sequence of the game explains that, on top of being an increidbly important piece of the Crucible, the Citadel is/houses the AI that created the Reapers in the first place. Which begs into question why it couldn't just shut down all mass relays before, and why all the mess the Reapers made in the first game to take control of the Citadel was needed when it was supposedly on their side all along.


** Another theory for how Zero was rebuilt was that [[TheUnfought Isoc]] had something to do with it. Much like Serges from ''VideoGame/MegamanX2'', Isoc has various traits and details that would imply that he's actually Dr. Wily reincarnated. Evidence to support this in Isoc's case is his fascination with Zero, yet bitter hatred to X, the fact that Isoc can paralyze Zero thanks to knowing every detail of how he functions (most experts who analyse Zero are left baffled), and even being voiced by Takeshi Aono, who had also done voice work for Dr. Wily beforehand. It would be much more likely that Isoc repaired Zero as opposed to Dr. Light's hologram (which neither ''X5'' nor ''X6'' makes clear as to how this hologram happened or how he can repair a destroyed robot). However, this raises a few more questions. Much like in ''X2'', there's no proper hint as to how transferring a human's mind to a robot's is at all possible, and if Isoc rebuilt Zero, then why did he leave him out to roam the world again without doing anything to make him carry out Wily's will? If Isoc really is Wily, it would make more sense than Zero's bizarre UnexplainedRecovery that most assume, though it still leaves many questions unanswered.

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** Another theory for how Zero was rebuilt was that [[TheUnfought Isoc]] had something to do with it. Much like Serges from ''VideoGame/MegamanX2'', ''VideoGame/MegaManX2'', Isoc has various traits and details that would imply that he's actually Dr. Wily reincarnated. Evidence to support this in Isoc's case is his fascination with Zero, yet bitter hatred to X, the fact that Isoc can paralyze Zero thanks to knowing every detail of how he functions (most experts who analyse Zero are left baffled), and even being voiced by Takeshi Aono, who had also done voice work for Dr. Wily beforehand. It would be much more likely that Isoc repaired Zero as opposed to Dr. Light's hologram (which neither ''X5'' nor ''X6'' makes clear as to how this hologram happened or how he can repair a destroyed robot). However, this raises a few more questions. Much like in ''X2'', there's no proper hint as to how transferring a human's mind to a robot's is at all possible, and if Isoc rebuilt Zero, then why did he leave him out to roam the world again without doing anything to make him carry out Wily's will? If Isoc really is Wily, it would make more sense than Zero's bizarre UnexplainedRecovery that most assume, though it still leaves many questions unanswered.



* In the NSFW ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' gender-bender comic ''Rock Gal'':

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* In the NSFW ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' ''Franchise/MegaMan'' gender-bender comic ''Rock Gal'':


** [[spoiler: It still doesn't explain why Davoth would look like a human to begin with.]]

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** [[spoiler: It [[spoiler:As per CanonWelding, the Doomslayer was originally a tough Marine, who presumably lived a normal life up until the events of the original games and ''VideoGame/Doom64'' (in which he is implied to have fought through different dimensions until he arrived in the universe found in the 2016 continuity), with no insinuation or explanation as to how, exactly, Davoth (who hasn't manifested in "like a decillion years," by the Intern, barring hyperbole) could have created him when his lifespan was intended to be that of a normal human]].
** [[spoiler:It
still doesn't explain why Davoth would look like a human to begin with.]]



** [[spoiler:Part One outright says Davoth hasn't manifested in "like a decillion years" (1 followed by 33 zeros). Even if this is hyperbole, it still doesn't explain how he could have created the Doomslayer personally, as he was basically helpless and trapped in an orb until the Doomslayer made him manifest in Part One.]]


** ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' introduced three Nohrian characters named Laslow, Selena, and Odin, who not only looked identical to three characters from ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' (Inigo, Severa, and Owain respectively), but also had the same voice actors. Initially it seemed they were just copies to attract fans, but in game it was revealed the three are the same three characters from ''Awakening''. Nothing in game explained how they were in Nohr, so a DLC story was released that explained that the [[GoodCounterpart good half]] of the games BigBad Anankos requested their aid in stopping him and protecting his child Corrin. This creates issues however, because nothing in the base game at all lines up with this. For starters, they were sent to Nohr to protect and help Corrin, but they never once indicate they seem to really know who Corrin is, nor do they express a desire to fight for Corrin, as seen when the three would rather fight and die for the Nohrian sibling they serve in ''Birthright''. They also never indicate in their supports that they know whats going on, despite Anankos providing them information that is clear enough for them to know what to do. It also fails to explain how, despite running into an at the time evil Lilith, they seem perfectly fine with her being Corrin's ''maid'' in what can be only a short time after they arrived in Nohr, despite the only time they met Lilith involved her trying to kill them. Anankos's involvement also brings up the major issue of how they can return home as their supports imply, as they only got to the world of ''Fates'' via a literal Dragon god of time, but at the end of the DLC, Anankos outright says his good half won't have long to live and in all three routes Anankos has gone crazy and his plans have been ruined. Theres also the simple matter of it being contrived how none of the other child units from ''Awakening'' appear, leaving a question of why Anankos only chose three random characters like them. Its believed by fans that the characters were included only because they were (in Japan) voted three of the four most popular characters from their game and generation, so an explanation was never intended until the game came out and one was made last minute.

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** ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' introduced three Nohrian characters named Laslow, Selena, and Odin, who not only looked identical to three characters from ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' (Inigo, Severa, and Owain respectively), but also had the same voice actors. Initially it seemed they were just copies to attract fans, but in game it was revealed the three are the same three characters from ''Awakening''. Nothing in game explained how they were in Nohr, so a DLC story was released that explained that the [[GoodCounterpart good half]] of the games BigBad Anankos requested their aid in stopping him and protecting his child Corrin. This creates issues however, because nothing in the base game at all lines up with this. For starters, they were sent to Nohr to protect and help Corrin, but they never once indicate they seem to really know who Corrin is, nor do they express a desire to fight for Corrin, as seen when the three would rather fight and die for the Nohrian sibling they serve in ''Birthright''. They also never indicate in their supports that they know whats what's going on, despite Anankos providing them information that is clear enough for them to know what to do. It also fails to explain how, despite running into an at the time evil Lilith, they seem perfectly fine with her being Corrin's ''maid'' in what can be only a short time after they arrived in Nohr, despite the only time they met Lilith involved her trying to kill them. Anankos's involvement also brings up the major issue of how they can return home as their supports imply, as they only got to the world of ''Fates'' via a literal Dragon god of time, but at the end of the DLC, Anankos outright says his good half won't have long to live and in all three routes Anankos has gone crazy and his plans have been ruined. Theres There's also the simple matter of it being contrived how none of the other child units from ''Awakening'' appear, leaving a question of why Anankos only chose three random characters like them. Its believed by fans that the characters were included only because they were (in Japan) voted three of the four most popular characters from their game and generation, so an explanation was never intended until the game came out and one was made last minute.


** In the first game, Covenant plasma weapons didn't use traditional ammo systems and instead had more of a battery with a [[{{Overheating}} heat meter]] to keep them from just dumping all their shots endlessly. In-game it was never really explained why you couldn't replace the batteries, but the early novels explained that the reason was that humanity lacked the knowledge of the Covenant's weapons to understand how they work and how to replace or recharge their batteries, compared to weapons like the Needler which used actual physical ammo that could be more traditionally reloaded. This doesn't hold up as well when ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' let you play as the Covenant Arbiter and ''still'' leave you no recourse for reloading an energy weapon other than [[ThrowAwayGuns dropping it and grabbing one with a higher charge]]. At best, there's the implication that it's the result of the Covenant's mindless devotion to their religion, e.g. having copied the weapons from similar Forerunner weapons without completely understanding how to replace or recharge the batteries.

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** In the first game, Covenant plasma weapons didn't use traditional ammo systems and instead had more of a battery with a [[{{Overheating}} heat meter]] to keep them from just dumping all their shots endlessly. In-game it was never really explained why you couldn't replace the batteries, but the early novels explained that the reason was that humanity lacked the knowledge of the Covenant's weapons to understand how they work and how to replace or recharge their batteries, compared to weapons like the Needler which used actual physical ammo that could be more traditionally reloaded. This doesn't hold up as well when ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' let you play as the Covenant Arbiter and ''still'' leave you no recourse for reloading an energy weapon other than [[ThrowAwayGuns dropping it and grabbing one with a higher charge]]. At best, there's the implication that it's the result of the Covenant's mindless devotion to their religion, e.g. having copied the weapons from similar Forerunner weapons without completely understanding how to replace or recharge the batteries.batteries, but nothing is ever stated about this aspect of the weapons.


** In the first game, Covenant weapons like the Plasma Rifle and Plasma Pistol didn't use traditional ammo systems and instead had more of a battery that they used that, when overused, would make them no longer function. In game it was never really explained why the weapons became unusable but the early novels said that the reason why in game the weapons were essentially thrown away after use was because humanity lacked knowledge of the Covenants weapons to understand how they work and how to get them to essentially "reload", compared to weapons like the Needler which is more ammo focused. While this explains why in the first game you would stop using them, games after the first never address this at all. For example, ''VideoGame/Halo2'' and ''VideoGame/Halo3'' allow you to play as the Arbiter, who, as a member of the Covenant, would logically know how they work and should be able to avert them not working properly, but instead the weapons function like they did in the first game. Its a hole in the story that never gets elaborated on and seems to have been forgotten entirely.
** In the first game, the enemies all had names that were designed to make it easy to tell what their role was. Grunts were TheGoomba, Elites were a {{Elite Mook|s}}, Jackals were less named for their combat role but their appearance and laugh, and the Hunter was a BossInMookClothes. It was justified in game by the fact that these names were what humanity called the Covenant, but in ''VideoGame/Halo2'', the Covenant say these names like its what they actually are. Later lore would provide names to the races of the Covenant, but its something that doesn't make sense at all and never gets addressed. The Jackals are especially odd, as why would an alien empire name one of their units after an Earth animal, especially when for all intense and purposes, they know so little of Earth before the Human-Covenant War?

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** In the first game, Covenant plasma weapons like the Plasma Rifle and Plasma Pistol didn't use traditional ammo systems and instead had more of a battery that they used that, when overused, would make with a [[{{Overheating}} heat meter]] to keep them no longer function. In game from just dumping all their shots endlessly. In-game it was never really explained why you couldn't replace the weapons became unusable batteries, but the early novels said explained that the reason why in game the weapons were essentially thrown away after use was because that humanity lacked the knowledge of the Covenants Covenant's weapons to understand how they work and how to get them to essentially "reload", replace or recharge their batteries, compared to weapons like the Needler which is used actual physical ammo that could be more ammo focused. While this explains why in the first game traditionally reloaded. This doesn't hold up as well when ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' let you would stop using them, games after the first never address this at all. For example, ''VideoGame/Halo2'' and ''VideoGame/Halo3'' allow you to play as the Arbiter, who, as Covenant Arbiter and ''still'' leave you no recourse for reloading an energy weapon other than [[ThrowAwayGuns dropping it and grabbing one with a member higher charge]]. At best, there's the implication that it's the result of the Covenant, would logically know how they work and should be able Covenant's mindless devotion to avert them not working properly, but instead their religion, e.g. having copied the weapons function like they did in from similar Forerunner weapons without completely understanding how to replace or recharge the first game. Its a hole in the story that never gets elaborated on and seems to have been forgotten entirely.
batteries.
** In the first game, the enemies all had names that were designed to make it easy to tell what their role was. Grunts were TheGoomba, Elites were a {{Elite Mook|s}}, EliteMooks, Jackals were less named for their combat role but their appearance and laugh, and the Hunter was a BossInMookClothes. BossInMookClothing. It was justified in game by the fact that these names were [[ReportingNames what humanity called the Covenant, them]], but in ''VideoGame/Halo2'', the Covenant say use these same names like its what they actually are. for themselves. Later lore would provide proper names to the races of the Covenant, e.g. Unggoy for the Grunts, but its it's something that doesn't make sense at all and never gets addressed. The Jackals addressed - at best it's just TranslationConvention, considering the Covenant are especially odd, as why would also suddenly speaking English now that we're getting an alien empire name one of their units after an Earth animal, especially when for all intense and purposes, actual look at how they know so little of Earth before the Human-Covenant War?work.


* The basic concept of ''WesternAnimation/TheLionKing2SimbasPride'' was a StarCrossedLovers story between Simba's daughter and Scar's son, Kovu, who is deemed the rightful king by his pride of Scar loyalists. However, during production somebody realized that this would make the two KissingCousins, so instead Kovu is explicitly ''not'' Scar's son. He's just Scar's appointed heir, [[InexplicablyIdenticalIndividuals who looks just like him]], with a mother fanatically devoted to Scar and no other father in sight. The aforementioned realization seems to have been made late during production, as certain dubs claim he's Scar's son anyway.

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* The basic concept of ''WesternAnimation/TheLionKing2SimbasPride'' was a StarCrossedLovers story between Simba's daughter and Scar's son, Kovu, who is deemed the rightful king by his pride of Scar loyalists. However, during production somebody realized that this would make the two KissingCousins, so instead Kovu is explicitly ''not'' Scar's son. He's just Scar's appointed heir, [[InexplicablyIdenticalIndividuals who looks just like him]], with a mother fanatically devoted to Scar and no other father in sight. The aforementioned realization seems to have been made late during production, as certain dubs claim he's Scar's son anyway. (Not that it matters, since there being only two male lions around in Simba's pride, as with real lions, either Mufasa or Scar is Nala's father. And seeing Simba's reaction to Kovu, Scar's "son", Simba and Nala are either siblings or half-siblings. Whoops!)


* Marvel again: The retcon that adamantium caused lead-like blood poisoning. Given adamantium's stated properties, its allergenic properties should be more like titanium than lead (i.e. should not cause a universal reaction). It was stated that Franchise/{{Wolverine}} and ComicBook/{{Sabretooth}}'s {{healing factor}}s could deal with the blood poisoning.[[note]]Which was a mild retcon from earlier revelations that the imperfect bonding process Wolverine went through rendered the subject's bones unable to produce red blood cells, necessitating a healing factor[[/note]] It was assumed that adamantium-bearing bad guys Lady Deathstrike and Cyber, being cyborgs, had some sort of artificial mojo to deal with it. Which left the [[EmpoweredBadassNormal otherwise normal]] ComicBook/{{Bullseye|MarvelComics}}, who had adamantium-laced bones, and had neither a healing factor nor cyborg parts to explain why he hadn't keeled over with blood poisoning. Rather than answer the question, they eventually stripped the adamantium from Bullseye.

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* Marvel again: The retcon that adamantium caused lead-like blood poisoning. Given adamantium's stated properties, its allergenic properties should be more like titanium than lead (i.e. should not cause a universal reaction). It was stated that Franchise/{{Wolverine}} ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} and ComicBook/{{Sabretooth}}'s {{healing factor}}s could deal with the blood poisoning.[[note]]Which was a mild retcon from earlier revelations that the imperfect bonding process Wolverine went through rendered the subject's bones unable to produce red blood cells, necessitating a healing factor[[/note]] It was assumed that adamantium-bearing bad guys Lady Deathstrike and Cyber, being cyborgs, had some sort of artificial mojo to deal with it. Which left the [[EmpoweredBadassNormal otherwise normal]] ComicBook/{{Bullseye|MarvelComics}}, who had adamantium-laced bones, and had neither a healing factor nor cyborg parts to explain why he hadn't keeled over with blood poisoning. Rather than answer the question, they eventually stripped the adamantium from Bullseye.

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** The whole reason given for why morphing heals all injuries is that it basically (re)creates the morpher's body from the DNA they acquired, and injuries obviously aren't genetic. The problem is: neither are memories and personalities, as one obviously can't inherit memories from one's parents, so why doesn't morphing erase ones [[LaserGuidedAmnesia memories]] and [[DeathOfPersonality personality]] every time someone does it?


* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'':One manual explains the presence of Wisps in games besides ''VideoGame/SonicColors'' despite [[ButNowIMustGo the Wisps leaving Earth at the end of that game]] as some of the Wisps having stuck around on Earth and occasionally helping out Sonic. But if that's true, doesn't it void the point of ''Colors'''s whole plot? Why are the Wisps okay with being weaponized in conflicts that don't involve them when their prior motivation was to not be used as weapons? Why would they want to stick around on a planet where they were enslaved and where they're in danger, instead of going home? Why don't we see this Wisp diaspora anywhere? And why don't the other characters mention this--especially Eggman, who used them as power sources before and would have every reason to try again?

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* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'':One ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'': One manual explains the presence of Wisps in games besides ''VideoGame/SonicColors'' despite [[ButNowIMustGo the Wisps leaving Earth at the end of that game]] as some of the Wisps having stuck around on Earth and occasionally helping out Sonic. But if that's true, doesn't it void the point of ''Colors'''s whole plot? Why are the Wisps okay with being weaponized in conflicts that don't involve them when their prior motivation was to not be used as weapons? Why would they want to stick around on a planet where they were enslaved and where they're in danger, instead of going home? Why don't we see this Wisp diaspora anywhere? And why don't the other characters mention this--especially Eggman, who used them as power sources before and would have every reason to try again?again?
** There's also the WordOfGod explanation that Sonic games take place on two different planets: One inhabited by humans, and one inhabited by FunnyAnimals, and that Sonic and friends travel between them. ''How'' they do this is never shown or explained, and it just raises further questions. If Sonic has access to planetary travel, why did he need to steal a space shuttle in ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2''? Why did he take Eggman's space elevator in ''VideoGame/SonicColors''? If Angel Island only exists on Sonic's world, how did it fall into the human planet's ocean in ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure''?

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