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This trope can also be used ''[[IntendedAudienceReaction purposely]]'', to make something creepy when creepiness is called for. Some examples of particular ways to produce this effect are listed under CreepilyLongArms, CreepyLongFingers, MalevolentMaskedMen, BodyHorror and UncannyValleyMakeup. Tropes such as EveryoneHatesMimes and MonsterClown may exist ''because'' of this trope, as such characters' full-face makeup and oddball behavior can rate as invoked examples of UncannyValley.

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This trope can also be used ''[[IntendedAudienceReaction purposely]]'', to make something creepy when creepiness is called for. Some examples of particular ways to produce this effect are listed under CreepilyLongArms, CreepyLongFingers, MalevolentMaskedMen, UndeadBarefooter, UndeathlyPallor, BodyHorror and UncannyValleyMakeup. Tropes such as EveryoneHatesMimes and MonsterClown may exist ''because'' of this trope, as such characters' full-face makeup and oddball behavior can rate as invoked examples of UncannyValley.


[[caption-width-right:320:''That's'' why zombies are scary.]]

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[[caption-width-right:320:''That's'' why zombies are scary.]]


In recent decades this trope has applied to film [[ComputerGeneratedImages CGI]] and video-game graphics, as technology has developed over time to allow for more photorealistic graphics, but not necessarily realistic ''movements''. It's become very easy for computers to simulate textures and skin tones, but convincing movement and facial expressions aren't so simple, often requiring MotionCapture to look realistic. More stylized 3D models or a 2D art can generally get away with odd animations or expressions, but the more realistic the graphics shoot for, the more noticeable it is when something isn't lining up with reality. This is normally a cost issue, as detailed animation can be extremely time-consuming to craft and even more so when one set of animations is used for multiple characters and still needs look natural for all of them. Not putting in enough effort can produce the effect where a character can come across as a something less than human, like a zombie. As computer graphics become ever more detailed and realistic, while also becoming more affordable, the Uncanny Valley becomes ever narrower, but it ''does not go away.''

Many cartoons nowadays prefer a simultaneously stylized yet simplified character design, versus the realistic look amongst some older cartoons. In the latter, it's more obvious the budget just didn't allow characters to move much. Heavily {{rotoscop|ing}}ed characters also often seem less real than more stylized animated characters, especially when they're in the same production. See the [[Creator/MaxAndDaveFleischer Fleischer Studios]] version of ''WesternAnimation/GulliversTravels'' for an example.

to:

In recent decades this This trope has applied to film [[ComputerGeneratedImages CGI]] and video-game graphics, as technology has developed over time to allow for more photorealistic graphics, but not necessarily realistic ''movements''. It's become very easy for computers to simulate textures and skin tones, but convincing movement and facial expressions aren't so simple, often requiring MotionCapture to look realistic. More stylized 3D models or a 2D art can generally get away with odd animations or expressions, but the more realistic the graphics shoot for, the more noticeable it is when something isn't lining up with reality. This is normally a cost issue, as detailed animation can be extremely time-consuming to craft and even more so when one set of animations is used for multiple characters and still needs to look natural for all of them. Not putting in enough effort can produce the effect where a character can come across as a something less than human, like a zombie. As computer graphics become ever more detailed and realistic, while also becoming more affordable, the Uncanny Valley becomes ever narrower, but it ''does not go away.''

Many cartoons nowadays prefer a simultaneously stylized yet simplified character design, versus the realistic look amongst among some older cartoons. In the latter, it's more obvious the budget just didn't allow characters to move much. Heavily {{rotoscop|ing}}ed characters also often seem less real than more stylized animated characters, especially when they're in the same production. See the [[Creator/MaxAndDaveFleischer Fleischer Studios]] version of ''WesternAnimation/GulliversTravels'' for an example.


This trope can also be used ''[[IntendedAudienceReaction purposely]]'', to make something creepy when creepiness is called for. Some examples of particular ways to produce this effect are listed under CreepilyLongArms, CreepyLongFingers, MalevolentMaskedMen, BodyHorror and UncannyValleyMakeup.

to:

This trope can also be used ''[[IntendedAudienceReaction purposely]]'', to make something creepy when creepiness is called for. Some examples of particular ways to produce this effect are listed under CreepilyLongArms, CreepyLongFingers, MalevolentMaskedMen, BodyHorror and UncannyValleyMakeup.
UncannyValleyMakeup. Tropes such as EveryoneHatesMimes and MonsterClown may exist ''because'' of this trope, as such characters' full-face makeup and oddball behavior can rate as invoked examples of UncannyValley.


Not to be confused with the game, ''VideoGame.UncannyValley''.

to:

Not to be confused with the game, ''VideoGame.UncannyValley''.''VideoGame/UncannyValley''.


Many cartoons nowadays prefer a simultaneously stylized yet simplified character design, versus the realistic look amongst some older cartoons. In the latter, it's more obvious the budget just didn't allow characters to move much. Heavily {{rotoscop|ing}}ed characters also often seem less real than more stylized animated characters, especially when they're in the same production. See the [[Creastor/MaxAndDaveFleischer Fleischer Studios]] version of ''WesternAnimation/GulliversTravels'' for an example.

to:

Many cartoons nowadays prefer a simultaneously stylized yet simplified character design, versus the realistic look amongst some older cartoons. In the latter, it's more obvious the budget just didn't allow characters to move much. Heavily {{rotoscop|ing}}ed characters also often seem less real than more stylized animated characters, especially when they're in the same production. See the [[Creastor/MaxAndDaveFleischer [[Creator/MaxAndDaveFleischer Fleischer Studios]] version of ''WesternAnimation/GulliversTravels'' for an example.


Many cartoons nowadays prefer a simultaneously stylized yet simplified character design, versus the realistic look amongst some older cartoons. In the latter, it's more obvious the budget just didn't allow characters to move much. Heavily {{rotoscop|ing}}ed characters also often seem less real than more stylized animated characters, especially when they're in the same production. See the Fleischer Studios version of ''Gulliver's Travels'' for an example.

to:

Many cartoons nowadays prefer a simultaneously stylized yet simplified character design, versus the realistic look amongst some older cartoons. In the latter, it's more obvious the budget just didn't allow characters to move much. Heavily {{rotoscop|ing}}ed characters also often seem less real than more stylized animated characters, especially when they're in the same production. See the [[Creastor/MaxAndDaveFleischer Fleischer Studios Studios]] version of ''Gulliver's Travels'' ''WesternAnimation/GulliversTravels'' for an example.



Not to be confused with the game, VideoGame/UncannyValley.

to:

Not to be confused with the game, VideoGame/UncannyValley.''VideoGame.UncannyValley''.


See also RealityIsUnrealistic, where the poor impression comes less from being "creepy" as from breaking [[TheCoconutEffect existing conventions which audiences had come to expect]]. In addition, there's OffModel, [[BishonenLine Bishonen Line]], NoFlowInCGI, and UglyCute. And while you're at it, see WhatMeasureIsANonCute, as the scientific study of that trope gave birth to this one. An opposite is EldritchAbomination, where the unsettling effect is caused by being way too unfamiliar rather than being way too human, yet still produces the same abominable effect (although the two can overlap as a HumanoidAbomination). FurriesAreEasierToDraw is a way artists get around the Uncanny Valley phenomenon; it's easy for drawn humans to to dip into the valley, but a cartoony talking animal doesn't evoke the same response.

to:

See also RealityIsUnrealistic, where the poor impression comes less from being "creepy" as from breaking [[TheCoconutEffect existing conventions which audiences had come to expect]]. In addition, there's OffModel, [[BishonenLine Bishonen Line]], NoFlowInCGI, and UglyCute. And while you're at it, see WhatMeasureIsANonCute, as the scientific study of that trope gave birth to this one. An opposite is EldritchAbomination, where the unsettling effect is caused by being way too unfamiliar rather than being way too human, yet still produces the same abominable effect (although the two can overlap as a HumanoidAbomination). FurriesAreEasierToDraw is a way artists get around the Uncanny Valley phenomenon; it's easy for drawn humans to to dip into the valley, but a cartoony talking animal doesn't evoke the same response.


[[caption-width-right:320:That's why zombies are scary.]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:320:That's [[caption-width-right:320:''That's'' why zombies are scary.]]


In recent decades this trope has applied to film [[ComputerGeneratedImages CGI]] and video-game graphics, as technology has developed over time to allow for more photorealistic graphics, but not necessarily realistic ''movements''. It's become very easy for computers to simulate textures and skin tones, but convincing movement and facial expressions aren't so simple, often requiring MotionCapture to look realistic. More stylized 3D models or a 2D art can generally get away with odd animations or expressions, but the more realistic the graphics shoot for, the more noticeable it is when something isn't lining up with reality. This is normally a cost issue, as detailed animation can be extremely time-consuming to craft and even more so when one set of animations is used for multiple characters and still needs look natural for all of them. Not putting in enough effort can produce the effect where a character can come across as a something less than human, like a zombie.

to:

In recent decades this trope has applied to film [[ComputerGeneratedImages CGI]] and video-game graphics, as technology has developed over time to allow for more photorealistic graphics, but not necessarily realistic ''movements''. It's become very easy for computers to simulate textures and skin tones, but convincing movement and facial expressions aren't so simple, often requiring MotionCapture to look realistic. More stylized 3D models or a 2D art can generally get away with odd animations or expressions, but the more realistic the graphics shoot for, the more noticeable it is when something isn't lining up with reality. This is normally a cost issue, as detailed animation can be extremely time-consuming to craft and even more so when one set of animations is used for multiple characters and still needs look natural for all of them. Not putting in enough effort can produce the effect where a character can come across as a something less than human, like a zombie.
zombie. As computer graphics become ever more detailed and realistic, while also becoming more affordable, the Uncanny Valley becomes ever narrower, but it ''does not go away.''


Not to be confused with the game, Uncanny Valley.

to:

Not to be confused with the game, Uncanny Valley.VideoGame/UncannyValley.

Added DiffLines:

Not to be confused with the game, Uncanny Valley.


For one notable example, the critically acclaimed ''VideoGame/LANoire'' received special recognition for its high-quality facial motion capture, allowing for the gameplay to focus heavily on reading the expressions of witnesses and suspects for the purposes of interrogation. However, because the engine only provided this level of detail in faces while human bodies were unnaturally stiff and jerky, many critics also cited being unnerved by the obvious dissonance between the active and alive faces and the rod-still bodies.



The psychological reasons behind the Uncanny Valley reaction are unknown, but seem to be rooted in human evolution. Under one theory, a thing that appears human, but moves unnaturally or herky-jerkily, is interpreted by the viewer's brain as a terribly damaged human and is thus unfit for mating. Hence the natural instinctive response is revulsion (compare to the reaction of seeing a person with a missing limb or feature). Another theory holds that the response is a vestigial reaction to what is perceived by the brain to be a predator's disguise or lure, which triggers a "threat" response.



This should not be confused with [[WebVideo/TheUncannyValley the 5th anniversary]] of Website/ThatGuyWithTheGlasses, which was named after this phenomenom, but had little to do with it.


Thus, things that look somewhat human, but are clearly not -- such as C-3PO (in ''Franchise/StarWars'') or a {{Golem}} -- produce an accepting reaction, while things that are very nearly human, but just a little strange -- such as a [[CreepyDoll child's doll]], a [[DemonicDummy ventriloquist's dummy]], or [[MonsterClown a clown]] -- produce a negative response. For some people, the resonance is stronger with a ''moving'' object, which is why a corpse is creepy but a moving corpse is creepier still. In fact, some people that don't have a problem with things like [[OurZombiesAreDifferent zombies]] and consider them merely another monster may still be creeped out by things like [[MarionetteMotion unnatural movement]].

to:

Thus, things that look somewhat human, but are clearly not -- such as C-3PO (in ''Franchise/StarWars'') or a {{Golem}} -- produce an accepting reaction, while things that are very nearly human, but just a little strange -- such as a [[CreepyDoll child's doll]], a [[DemonicDummy ventriloquist's dummy]], or [[MonsterClown [[ClownTropes a clown]] -- produce a negative response. For some people, the resonance is stronger with a ''moving'' object, which is why a corpse is creepy but a moving corpse is creepier still. In fact, some people that don't have a problem with things like [[OurZombiesAreDifferent zombies]] and consider them merely another monster may still be creeped out by things like [[MarionetteMotion unnatural movement]].
movement]].



This idea has recently been applied to CG effects. While it's become very easy for programs to simulate textures and skin tones, convincing movement and facial expressions aren't always as simple. This can produce an effect where the character comes off as a zombie, if a production company is going for a purely realistic human look.

Many cartoons nowadays prefer a simultaneously stylized yet simplified character design, versus the realistic look amongst some older cartoons. In the latter, it's more obvious the budget just didn't allow characters to move much. Heavily rotoscoped characters also often seem less real than more stylized animated characters, especially when they're in the same production. See the Fleischer Studios version of ''Gulliver's Travels'' for an example.

This also happens in video games, as technology has developed over time to allow for more photorealistic graphics, but not necessarily realistic ''movements'' within the game world. A more stylized game or a 2D game can generally get away with odd animations or expressions, but the more realistic the graphics shoot for, the more noticeable it is when something isn't lining up with reality. This is normally a cost issue, as detailed animation cycles are extremely time-consuming to craft and even more so when they must be applied to multiple [=NPCs=] and still look natural for every single person. For one notable example, the critically acclaimed ''VideoGame/LANoire'' received special recognition for its high-quality facial motion capture, allowing for the gameplay to focus heavily on reading the expressions of witnesses and suspects for the purposes of interrogation. However, because the engine only provided this level of detail in faces while human bodies were unnaturally stiff and jerky, many critics also cited being unnerved by the obvious dissonance between the active and alive faces and the rod-still bodies.

The psychological reasons behind the Uncanny Valley reaction are unknown, but seem to be rooted in human evolution. Under one theory, a thing that appears human, but moves unnaturally or herky-jerkily, is interpreted by the viewer's brain as a terribly damaged human and is thus unfit for mating. Hence the natural instinctive response is revulsion (compare to the reaction of seeing a person with a missing limb or feature). Another theory holds that the response is a vestigial reaction to what is perceived by the brain to be a predator's disguise or lure, which triggers a "threat" response.

to:

This idea In recent decades this trope has recently been applied to CG effects. While it's become very easy for programs to simulate textures film [[ComputerGeneratedImages CGI]] and skin tones, convincing movement and facial expressions aren't always as simple. This can produce an effect where the character comes off as a zombie, if a production company is going for a purely realistic human look.

Many cartoons nowadays prefer a simultaneously stylized yet simplified character design, versus the realistic look amongst some older cartoons. In the latter, it's more obvious the budget just didn't allow characters to move much. Heavily rotoscoped characters also often seem less real than more stylized animated characters, especially when they're in the same production. See the Fleischer Studios version of ''Gulliver's Travels'' for an example.

This also happens in video games,
video-game graphics, as technology has developed over time to allow for more photorealistic graphics, but not necessarily realistic ''movements'' within the game world. A more ''movements''. It's become very easy for computers to simulate textures and skin tones, but convincing movement and facial expressions aren't so simple, often requiring MotionCapture to look realistic. More stylized game 3D models or a 2D game art can generally get away with odd animations or expressions, but the more realistic the graphics shoot for, the more noticeable it is when something isn't lining up with reality. This is normally a cost issue, as detailed animation cycles are can be extremely time-consuming to craft and even more so when they must be applied to one set of animations is used for multiple [=NPCs=] characters and still needs look natural for every single person. all of them. Not putting in enough effort can produce the effect where a character can come across as a something less than human, like a zombie.

For one notable example, the critically acclaimed ''VideoGame/LANoire'' received special recognition for its high-quality facial motion capture, allowing for the gameplay to focus heavily on reading the expressions of witnesses and suspects for the purposes of interrogation. However, because the engine only provided this level of detail in faces while human bodies were unnaturally stiff and jerky, many critics also cited being unnerved by the obvious dissonance between the active and alive faces and the rod-still bodies.

Many cartoons nowadays prefer a simultaneously stylized yet simplified character design, versus the realistic look amongst some older cartoons. In the latter, it's more obvious the budget just didn't allow characters to move much. Heavily {{rotoscop|ing}}ed characters also often seem less real than more stylized animated characters, especially when they're in the same production. See the Fleischer Studios version of ''Gulliver's Travels'' for an example.

The psychological reasons behind the Uncanny Valley reaction are unknown, but seem to be rooted in human evolution. Under one theory, a thing that appears human, but moves unnaturally or herky-jerkily, is interpreted by the viewer's brain as a terribly damaged human and is thus unfit for mating. Hence the natural instinctive response is revulsion (compare to the reaction of seeing a person with a missing limb or feature). Another theory holds that the response is a vestigial reaction to what is perceived by the brain to be a predator's disguise or lure, which triggers a "threat" response.
response.



See also RealityIsUnrealistic, where the poor impression comes less from being "creepy" as from breaking [[TheCoconutEffect existing conventions which audiences had come to expect]]. In addition, there's OffModel, [[BishonenLine Bishonen Line]], NoFlowInCGI, and UglyCute. And while you're at it, see WhatMeasureIsANonCute, as the scientific study of that trope gave birth to this one. An opposite is EldritchAbomination, where the unsettling effect is caused by being way too unfamiliar rather than being way too human, yet still produces the same abominable effect (although the two can overlap as a HumanoidAbomination). FurriesAreEasierToDraw is a way artists get around the Uncanny Valley phenomenon; it's easy for drawn humans to to dip into the valley, but a cartoony talking animal doesn't evoke the same response.


Added DiffLines:

See also RealityIsUnrealistic, where the poor impression comes less from being "creepy" as from breaking [[TheCoconutEffect existing conventions which audiences had come to expect]]. In addition, there's OffModel, [[BishonenLine Bishonen Line]], NoFlowInCGI, and UglyCute. And while you're at it, see WhatMeasureIsANonCute, as the scientific study of that trope gave birth to this one. An opposite is EldritchAbomination, where the unsettling effect is caused by being way too unfamiliar rather than being way too human, yet still produces the same abominable effect (although the two can overlap as a HumanoidAbomination). FurriesAreEasierToDraw is a way artists get around the Uncanny Valley phenomenon; it's easy for drawn humans to to dip into the valley, but a cartoony talking animal doesn't evoke the same response.


Added DiffLines:



The psychological reasons behind the Uncanny Valley reaction are unknown, but seem to be rooted in human evolution. Under one theory, a thing that appears human, but moves unnaturally or herky-jerkily, is interpreted by the viewer's brain as a terribly damaged human and is thus unfit for mating. Hence the natural instinctive response is revulsion (compare to the reaction of seeing a person with a missing limb or feature). Another theory holds that the response is a vestigial reaction to what is perceived by the brain to be a predator's disguise or lure.

to:

The psychological reasons behind the Uncanny Valley reaction are unknown, but seem to be rooted in human evolution. Under one theory, a thing that appears human, but moves unnaturally or herky-jerkily, is interpreted by the viewer's brain as a terribly damaged human and is thus unfit for mating. Hence the natural instinctive response is revulsion (compare to the reaction of seeing a person with a missing limb or feature). Another theory holds that the response is a vestigial reaction to what is perceived by the brain to be a predator's disguise or lure.lure, which triggers a "threat" response.

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