Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Main / Twinking

Go To



* In early releases of ''VideoGame/{{Ys}} I'', it was possible to go into the mine (the second dungeon), avoid the over-powered monsters, and grab some chests containing high-level gear better than anything you could afford at that time before setting foot in the first dungeon. Later adaptations fixed that by locking the chests in the second dungeon with a key that was found in the first dungeon.

to:

* In early releases of ''VideoGame/{{Ys}} I'', it was possible to go into the mine (the second dungeon), avoid the over-powered monsters, and grab some chests containing high-level gear better than anything you could afford at that time before setting foot in the first dungeon. Later adaptations fixed that by locking the chests in the second dungeon with a key that was found in the first dungeon.

Added DiffLines:

* In early releases of ''VideoGame/{{Ys}} I'', it was possible to go into the mine (the second dungeon), avoid the over-powered monsters, and grab some chests containing high-level gear better than anything you could afford at that time before setting foot in the first dungeon. Later adaptations fixed that by locking the chests in the second dungeon with a key that was found in the first dungeon.


** Pokémon can be given items to hold, then traded. This means that any item which can be held can be transferred between games - this includes TMs for powerful moves such as Earthquake, and items [[VendorTrash which can be sold for massive amounts of money, such as the Balm Mushroom]], as well as more mundane things such as Poké Balls and healing items of much higher quality than anything normally available at that point in the game.

to:

** Pokémon can be given items to hold, then traded. This means that any item which can be held can be transferred between games - this includes TMs [=TMs=] for powerful moves such as Earthquake, and items [[VendorTrash which can be sold for massive amounts of money, such as the Balm Mushroom]], as well as more mundane things such as Poké Balls and healing items of much higher quality than anything normally available at that point in the game.

Added DiffLines:

** Pokémon can be given items to hold, then traded. This means that any item which can be held can be transferred between games - this includes TMs for powerful moves such as Earthquake, and items [[VendorTrash which can be sold for massive amounts of money, such as the Balm Mushroom]], as well as more mundane things such as Poké Balls and healing items of much higher quality than anything normally available at that point in the game.

Added DiffLines:

** The game counts any Pokémon which appeared in the battle as having "actively participated", even if it didn't do anything and was immediately switched out for another, stronger mon. If it's holding the Exp. Share or a Lucky Egg, it can even gain significantly more experience than the mons that were actually fighting.


* ''Franchise/{{Diablo}}'':

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Diablo}}'':''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'':


* Due to Creator/FromSoftware not taking any precautions against it, this completely broke the [=PvP=] in ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsI'' as players would (by using dual accounts) pass late-game, leveled-up weapons and armour to new characters so they could invade ''actual'' new players in the early areas (usually the first multiplayer area, Undead Burg) and brutally murder them without mercy ForTheEvulz. Of course, if they ''really'' wanted to bully new players (and they did) they could just shamelessly hack the game anyway to make themselves invincible or kill their victim and permanently cripple their character in one hit (and they did) because From were ''terrible'' at anti-cheat, so in the end the twinkers were arguably the ''least'' of the [=PvP's=] balance problems...

to:

* Due to Creator/FromSoftware not taking any precautions against it, this This completely broke the [=PvP=] in ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsI'' as players would (by using dual accounts) pass late-game, leveled-up weapons and armour armor to new characters so they could invade ''actual'' new players in the early areas (usually the first multiplayer area, Undead Burg) and brutally murder them without mercy ForTheEvulz. Of course, if they ''really'' wanted to bully new players (and they did) they could just shamelessly hack the game anyway to make themselves invincible or kill their victim and permanently cripple their character in one hit (and they did) because From were ''terrible'' at anti-cheat, so in the end the twinkers were arguably the ''least'' of the [=PvP's=] balance problems...ForTheEvulz.

Added DiffLines:

* Due to Creator/FromSoftware not taking any precautions against it, this completely broke the [=PvP=] in ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsI'' as players would (by using dual accounts) pass late-game, leveled-up weapons and armour to new characters so they could invade ''actual'' new players in the early areas (usually the first multiplayer area, Undead Burg) and brutally murder them without mercy ForTheEvulz. Of course, if they ''really'' wanted to bully new players (and they did) they could just shamelessly hack the game anyway to make themselves invincible or kill their victim and permanently cripple their character in one hit (and they did) because From were ''terrible'' at anti-cheat, so in the end the twinkers were arguably the ''least'' of the [=PvP's=] balance problems...

Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIII'', due to new classes starting at level one by the time the party has reached the midpoint of the game, the party will typically bring low level party members into high level fights to quickly gain levels for those low level party members.


[[IThoughtItMeant Not to be confused with]] TheTwink; the two words may share some etymology (see [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twinking the article]] on Wiki/TheOtherWiki for details) but are otherwise unrelated.

to:

[[IThoughtItMeant [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant Not to be confused with]] TheTwink; the two words may share some etymology (see [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twinking the article]] on Wiki/TheOtherWiki for details) but are otherwise unrelated.

Added DiffLines:

* ''Videogame/{{EverQuest II}}'', for its' part, had the shared banks and the attuning system from the beginning. Gear and items in [=EQ2=] were also level-limited, so a player at a lower level than intended for the gear simply couldn't use it until they achieved that level.


* ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' has three ways to do this, at least one of which is completely intentional on the part of the developers. You can use face-to-face trading or in-game email to transfer unbound items between characters or even between accounts, and you can buy account bank slots to transfer account-bound items to alts. The latter include everything from some types of currency to the Reputation tokens introduced in Season 8, which are explicitly meant to be created on one character and handed over to an alt (to speed the alt's progression in the Reputation system and [[AntiFrustrationFeatures alleviate the grind]]).
* In the "vanilla" times (i.e. the time before expansions) of ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', a popular form of twinking was to stop leveling after you hit level 19 and get the most effective gear possible. This included [[DungeonCrawling farming dungeons]] for certain items, choosing the Engineering profession just so that you could get an item in the helm slot as early as in level 19, and getting high-level enchantments for your weapons (which back then didn't have any level limitations, so you could have level 60 enchantments in your level 19 weapons). Since most low-level players don't have money for stuff like enchantments (and they don't stay level 19 for long anyway), this made you an unstoppable killing machine in {{P|layerVersusPlayer}}VP.
** The above tended to have unusual effects on the economy. Example: the best weapon available for a lv.19 rogue, the rare world-drop Assassin's Blade, would sell on the auction house for over a thousand gold, higher than some max-level weapons.
** Blizzard later introduced an intentional version with Heirlooms, gear that can only be purchased with currencies earned at max level. Heirlooms are account-bound, so you can send them from character to character at will, they scale with level (until you hit 5 levels below max, i.e., current expansion content), they will always be as good as or better than the gear you could normally get at that level, and they also grant an XP gain bonus. Their entire purpose is to let low level alts of high level players tear through the content they've already beaten at least once, so they can get to the good stuff faster.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Mabinogi}}'', since a single account can have multiple characters (three before you even need to spend money), most of a given player's characters will have gear that their earlier characters leveled up enough to [[ItemCrafting craft]] or saved up to buy. However, this only takes you so far, since most of a character's combat power is intrinsic and the weapon functions more as a focus than a source.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Elsword}}'' the LevelLockedLoot system is in effect, but only with equipment, so you can trade everything else with all your characters. Newly-made accounts cannot send items or access the market for their first five days, but they can still receive items from everyone else.


Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/{{Elsword}}'' the LevelLockedLoot system is in effect, but only with equipment, so you can trade everything else with all your characters. Newly-made accounts cannot send items or access the market for their first five days, but they can still receive items from everyone else.
* ''Videogame/{{EverQuest}}'' originally had few limits on what gear a player could equip, but no easy method of transferring goods from one player to another. This lead to things like players trying to find a hidden spot to ''drop'' the item they wanted to transfer where the other player could pick it up. And yes, occasionally another player would find the item before the former owner could get the new character to the gear - and the [=GMs=] were unsympathetic to players who lost gear doing this. Asking a third party to hold onto the item and transfer it was another way, but it had the same problem, and the same downfall if the transferring friend's greed overcame him. Over the years Everquest gradually became more friendly to players trying to speed their alts to high level, and added the shared bank. However, it also added a feature in which gear equipped on a player much lower than the intended level would have reduced stats. It also introduced the attuning system, where gear became locked to a player so they couldn't pass it on to ''anyone''.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Mabinogi}}'', since a single account can have multiple characters (three before you even need to spend money), most of a given player's characters will have gear that their earlier characters leveled up enough to [[ItemCrafting craft]] or saved up to buy. However, this only takes you so far, since most of a character's combat power is intrinsic and the weapon functions more as a focus than a source.
* ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' has three ways to do this, at least one of which is completely intentional on the part of the developers. You can use face-to-face trading or in-game email to transfer unbound items between characters or even between accounts, and you can buy account bank slots to transfer account-bound items to alts. The latter include everything from some types of currency to the Reputation tokens introduced in Season 8, which are explicitly meant to be created on one character and handed over to an alt (to speed the alt's progression in the Reputation system and [[AntiFrustrationFeatures alleviate the grind]]).
* In the "vanilla" times (i.e. the time before expansions) of ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', a popular form of twinking was to stop leveling after you hit level 19 and get the most effective gear possible. This included [[DungeonCrawling farming dungeons]] for certain items, choosing the Engineering profession just so that you could get an item in the helm slot as early as in level 19, and getting high-level enchantments for your weapons (which back then didn't have any level limitations, so you could have level 60 enchantments in your level 19 weapons). Since most low-level players don't have money for stuff like enchantments (and they don't stay level 19 for long anyway), this made you an unstoppable killing machine in {{P|layerVersusPlayer}}VP.
** The above tended to have unusual effects on the economy. Example: the best weapon available for a lv.19 rogue, the rare world-drop Assassin's Blade, would sell on the auction house for over a thousand gold, higher than some max-level weapons.
** Blizzard later introduced an intentional version with Heirlooms, gear that can only be purchased with currencies earned at max level. Heirlooms are account-bound, so you can send them from character to character at will, they scale with level (until you hit 5 levels below max, i.e., current expansion content), they will always be as good as or better than the gear you could normally get at that level, and they also grant an XP gain bonus. Their entire purpose is to let low level alts of high level players tear through the content they've already beaten at least once, so they can get to the good stuff faster.


A favored tactic of TheMunchkin and to avert EarlyGameHell. Can easily be a DiscOneNuke and/or a GameBreaker. Compare {{Macrogame}}, SequenceBreaking, LeakedExperience, and EquipmentBasedProgression. Contrast LevelLockedLoot and NewGamePlus.

to:

A favored tactic of TheMunchkin and to avert EarlyGameHell. Can easily be a DiscOneNuke and/or a GameBreaker. Compare LowLevelAdvantage, {{Macrogame}}, SequenceBreaking, LeakedExperience, and EquipmentBasedProgression. Contrast LevelLockedLoot and NewGamePlus.


[[IThoughtItMeant Not to be confused with]] TheTwink; the two words may share some etymology (see [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twinking the article]] on TheOtherWiki for details) but are otherwise unrelated.

to:

[[IThoughtItMeant Not to be confused with]] TheTwink; the two words may share some etymology (see [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twinking the article]] on TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki for details) but are otherwise unrelated.


This tactic [[BaseBreaker tends to be controversial]]; [[{{Scrub}} some see it]] as [[LoopholeAbuse a cheat or an exploit]], others as a valid part of the {{Metagame}}. And of course different games handle it differently. Some discourage it by throttling LeakedExperience and using strict LevelLockedLoot. Others encourage some amount of it by giving players a [[BagOfSharing shared item stash]] accessible by all characters or allowing small bonuses earned by high-level characters to apply to low-level characters on the same account. Still others [[ZigZaggingTrope do both at once.]]

to:

This tactic [[BaseBreaker tends to be controversial]]; controversial; [[{{Scrub}} some see it]] as [[LoopholeAbuse a cheat or an exploit]], others as a valid part of the {{Metagame}}. And of course different games handle it differently. Some discourage it by throttling LeakedExperience and using strict LevelLockedLoot. Others encourage some amount of it by giving players a [[BagOfSharing shared item stash]] accessible by all characters or allowing small bonuses earned by high-level characters to apply to low-level characters on the same account. Still others [[ZigZaggingTrope do both at once.]]

Showing 15 edit(s) of 41

Top

Example of:

/
/

Feedback