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** And then there was [[CreatorsPet Wesley Crusher]] in "Justice", but that was more about the punishment than the crime. Too bad they failed to carry out the sentence...

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** And then there was [[CreatorsPet Wesley Crusher]] in "Justice", but that was more about [[DisproportionateRetribution the punishment punishment]] than the crime. Too bad they failed to carry out the sentence...


Often a case of GoodVersusGood, or at least WhiteAndGrayMorality.

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Often a case of GoodVersusGood, or at least WhiteAndGrayMorality.WhiteAndGreyMorality.


* The [[WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts Classic Disney Short]] ''Disney/PlutosJudgementDay'' is apparently about [[WesternAnimation/PlutoThePup Pluto]] having a nightmare about him being put on trial by a jury of demonic cats in Hell after WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse scolds him one day for chasing a cat. Some of the cats that are testifying against Pluto include a cat that was flattened after Pluto chased him under a steamroller, and nine angels representing the lost lives of a dead cat named Uncle Tom, whom Pluto apparently murdered by chasing him into a river, causing him to drown. Pluto is then proven guilty by the cat jury, and is immediately sentenced to death by being dropped into a fire.

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* The [[WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts Classic Disney Short]] ''Disney/PlutosJudgementDay'' "WesternAnimation/PlutosJudgementDay" is apparently about [[WesternAnimation/PlutoThePup Pluto]] having a nightmare about him being put on trial by a jury of demonic cats in Hell after WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse scolds him one day for chasing a cat. Some of the cats that are testifying against Pluto include a cat that was flattened after Pluto chased him under a steamroller, and nine angels representing the lost lives of a dead cat named Uncle Tom, whom Pluto apparently murdered by chasing him into a river, causing him to drown. Pluto is then proven guilty by the cat jury, and is immediately sentenced to death by being dropped into a fire.


This is an interesting trope, as it means that the hero's biggest threat at the moment isn't the BigBad, any {{Mooks}}, or anything like that, but rather, [[InspectorJavert someone who is ostensibly good but has mistaken the hero for being bad]]. Even more worryingly, they may have unquestionably [[BlueAndOrangeMorality broken the natives' laws by doing something perfectly ordinary]], and be forced to [[HumanityOnTrial defend humanity in general]]. This is even more dramatic if the hero is threatened with death by these non-bad guys. In fact, this trope essentially means that if the characters who run these trials are powerful enough, they could pose a legitimate threat to the hero's future activities, in a way that a CardCarryingVillain never could. They may even make the main characters question themselves and their own actions and hopefully even provide some answers for both the court and the audience.

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This is an interesting trope, as it means that the hero's biggest threat at the moment isn't the BigBad, any {{Mooks}}, or anything like that, but rather, [[InspectorJavert someone who is ostensibly good but has mistaken the hero for being bad]]. Even more worryingly, they may have unquestionably [[BlueAndOrangeMorality broken the natives' laws by doing something perfectly ordinary]], and be forced to [[HumanityOnTrial defend humanity in general]]. This is even more dramatic if the hero is threatened with death by these non-bad guys. In fact, this trope essentially means that if the characters who run these trials are powerful enough, they could pose a legitimate threat to the hero's future activities, in a way that a CardCarryingVillain never could. They may even make the main characters question themselves and their own actions and hopefully even provide some philosophical answers for both the court and the audience.


This is an interesting trope, as it means that the hero's biggest threat at the moment isn't the BigBad, any {{Mooks}}, or anything like that, but rather, [[InspectorJavert someone who is ostensibly good but has mistaken the hero for being bad]]. Even more worryingly, they may have unquestionably [[BlueAndOrangeMorality broken the natives' laws by doing something perfectly ordinary]], and be forced to [[HumanityOnTrial defend humanity in general]]. This is even more dramatic if the hero is threatened with death by these non-bad guys. In fact, this trope essentially means that if the characters who run these trials are powerful enough, they could pose a legitimate threat to the hero's future activities, in a way that a CardCarryingVillain never could.

to:

This is an interesting trope, as it means that the hero's biggest threat at the moment isn't the BigBad, any {{Mooks}}, or anything like that, but rather, [[InspectorJavert someone who is ostensibly good but has mistaken the hero for being bad]]. Even more worryingly, they may have unquestionably [[BlueAndOrangeMorality broken the natives' laws by doing something perfectly ordinary]], and be forced to [[HumanityOnTrial defend humanity in general]]. This is even more dramatic if the hero is threatened with death by these non-bad guys. In fact, this trope essentially means that if the characters who run these trials are powerful enough, they could pose a legitimate threat to the hero's future activities, in a way that a CardCarryingVillain never could.
could. They may even make the main characters question themselves and their own actions and hopefully even provide some answers for both the court and the audience.


* The failed Genesis game ''VideoGame/AwesomePossum'' has a trial of various tropical animals demanding you to answer various ecological questions for points.

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* The failed Genesis game ''VideoGame/AwesomePossum'' ''VideoGame/AwesomePossumKicksDrMachinosButt'' has a trial of various tropical animals demanding you to answer various ecological questions for points.


* "Zoned Out" was ''[[WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls Powerpuff Girls]]'' fan picture strip story heavy on influences from ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' that opens with a trial against the girls. The Mayor is the judge and the jury is comprised of people they know and love--with the Professor as the foreman. It's a DreamSequence, leading to the body of the story (who is causing mayhem in Townsville--or could it be the girls themselves?).

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* "Zoned Out" was ''[[WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls Powerpuff Girls]]'' fan picture strip story heavy on influences from ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'' that opens with a trial against the girls. The Mayor is the judge and the jury is comprised of people they know and love--with the Professor as the foreman. It's a DreamSequence, leading to the body of the story (who is causing mayhem in Townsville--or could it be the girls themselves?).




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* ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'': In "[[Recap/TheTwilightZoneS3E74DeathsHeadRevisited Deaths-Head Revisited]]", Gunter Lütze is put on trial by the ghosts of his victims at Dachau. He is found guilty and sentenced to a lifetime of insanity.


* The corrupt eponymous hero of Sheridan [=LeFanu=]'s ''Mr. Justice Harbottle'' is put on trial by a jury [[spoiler:of those he has had wrongfully executed]] and a judge [[spoiler:who is a parody of himself]].

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* The corrupt eponymous hero of Sheridan [=LeFanu=]'s Creator/JosephSheridanLeFanu's ''Mr. Justice Harbottle'' is put on trial by a jury [[spoiler:of those he has had wrongfully executed]] and a judge [[spoiler:who is a parody of himself]].


* In ''StarWars: KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', the protagonist finds himself on Manaan, a planet that has declared itself neutral in the ongoing war between the Republic and the Sith, but trades freely with both of them. After being hired by the Republic to spy on the Sith on the planet, he is caught red-handed massacring the entire population of the Sith base and is put on trial for breaking the neutrality treaty. Later, under vaguely-related circumstances, the exact same thing happens. Interesting in that both times the hero is actually guilty of what he's being charged with, but having the unquestionable moral high ground (or being [[KarmaMeter that damn evil]]) helps him talk his way out of it.

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* In ''StarWars: KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', ''Franchise/StarWars: VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', the protagonist finds himself on Manaan, a planet that has declared itself neutral in the ongoing war between the Republic and the Sith, but trades freely with both of them. After being hired by the Republic to spy on the Sith on the planet, he is caught red-handed massacring the entire population of the Sith base and is put on trial for breaking the neutrality treaty. Later, under vaguely-related circumstances, the exact same thing happens. Interesting in that both times the hero is actually guilty of what he's being charged with, but having the unquestionable moral high ground (or being [[KarmaMeter that damn evil]]) helps him talk his way out of it.


** Homer dreams of being tried by a jury of donuts. He ends up taking a bite out of his Defense Attorney. [[CaptainObvious It doesn't help his case.]]

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** Homer dreams of being tried by a jury of donuts. He ends up taking a bite out of his Defense Attorney. [[CaptainObvious It doesn't help his case.]]


* ''Series/PowerRangersMysticForce'' had a literal Mystical Jury called ''The Tribunal of Magic'' judge whether or not to reverse a magic wish which stripped the heroes' powers away. They decide that the begging and pleading from the heroes (as well as the fact that they're the planet's only hope) isn't good enough, and it's not until the near end of the episode (by which point the SixthRanger is down for the count and the heroes are literally backed up against a chainlink fence) that they turn their ruling around.

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* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'':
**
''Series/PowerRangersMysticForce'' had a literal Mystical Jury called ''The Tribunal of Magic'' judge whether or not to reverse a magic wish which stripped the heroes' powers away. They decide that the begging and pleading from the heroes (as well as the fact that they're the planet's only hope) isn't good enough, and it's not until the near end of the episode (by which point the SixthRanger is down for the count and the heroes are literally backed up against a chainlink fence) that they turn their ruling around.around.
** ''Series/PowerRangersDinoCharge'': The season 2 episode "Trick or Trial" introduces the Halloween Intergalactic Court, a court system associated with the monster community. Not truly villains, they charged the Rangers with attacking "innocent monsters" (really Sledge's prisoners, who all lied under oath when their spirits were summoned), but were ultimately convinced otherwise when it was pointed out that the prosecutor Scumlaw had rigged the jury.
** ''Series/PowerRangersNinjaSteel'': The season 2 episode "Monster Mix-Up" features the return of the Halloween Intergalactic Court, this time trying the six Gruesome Grunts (an evil team of monsters). Most of the trial involves the Rangers trying to prove they and the Grunts had switched bodies due to another monster named Versix (which they had), until a disguised Mick arrives and testifies for them, getting the court to investigate his claims more carefully. When it's proven to be true, the Court restores all of them to their rightful bodies and releases the Rangers to deal with Versix.


* The [[TimePolice Time Variance Authority]] had been seen a few times before they arrested ComicBook/SheHulk for attempting to alter the present (she slipped a past version of Hawkeye a note warning him about his death) but that would be the first time their courtroom legal proceedings were viewed. The trials are actually quite reasonable as far as fairness is concerned; they'll provide any necessary witnesses for the defense and go out of their way to provide a defense attorney who is knowledgeable enough, using their own TimeTravel technology to find one if necessary. (In She-Hulk's case, they brought her friend Southpaw from an AlternateReality where Southpaw was a defense attorney.) Sentences they hand down, however, can be harsh; they can sentence a convicted criminal to be [[RetGone erased from existence, literally]].

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* The [[TimePolice Time Variance Authority]] had been seen a few times before they arrested ComicBook/SheHulk for attempting to alter the present (she slipped a past version of Hawkeye a note warning him about his death) but that would be the first time their courtroom legal proceedings were viewed. The trials are actually quite reasonable as far as fairness is concerned; they'll provide any necessary witnesses for the defense and go out of their way to provide a defense attorney who is knowledgeable enough, using their own TimeTravel technology to find one if necessary. (In She-Hulk's case, they brought her friend Southpaw from an AlternateReality AlternateUniverse where Southpaw was a defense attorney.) Sentences they hand down, however, can be harsh; they can sentence a convicted criminal to be [[RetGone erased from existence, literally]].


* "Zoned Out" was ''[[WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls Powerpuff Girls]]'' fan picture strip story heavy on influences from ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' that opens with a trial against the girls. The Mayor is the judge and the jury is comprised of people they know and love--with the Professor as the foreman. It's a DreamSequence, leading to the body of the story (who causing mayhem in Townsville--or could it be the girls themselves?).

to:

* "Zoned Out" was ''[[WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls Powerpuff Girls]]'' fan picture strip story heavy on influences from ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' that opens with a trial against the girls. The Mayor is the judge and the jury is comprised of people they know and love--with the Professor as the foreman. It's a DreamSequence, leading to the body of the story (who is causing mayhem in Townsville--or could it be the girls themselves?).


* "Zoned Out" was ''[[WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls PowerpuffGirls]] fan picture strip story heavy on influences from ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' that opens with a trial against the girls. The Mayor is the judge and the jury is comprised of people they know and love--with the Professor as the foreman. It's a DreamSequence, leading to the body of the story (who causing mayhem in Townsville--or could it be the girls themselves?).

to:

* "Zoned Out" was ''[[WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls PowerpuffGirls]] Powerpuff Girls]]'' fan picture strip story heavy on influences from ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' that opens with a trial against the girls. The Mayor is the judge and the jury is comprised of people they know and love--with the Professor as the foreman. It's a DreamSequence, leading to the body of the story (who causing mayhem in Townsville--or could it be the girls themselves?).



[[folder: Fan Fiction]]
* "Zoned Out" was ''[[WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls PowerpuffGirls]] fan picture strip story heavy on influences from ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' that opens with a trial against the girls. The Mayor is the judge and the jury is comprised of people they know and love--with the Professor as the foreman. It's a DreamSequence, leading to the body of the story (who causing mayhem in Townsville--or could it be the girls themselves?).


Added DiffLines:

[[folder: Fan Fiction]]
* "Zoned Out" was ''[[WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls PowerpuffGirls]] fan picture strip story heavy on influences from ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' that opens with a trial against the girls. The Mayor is the judge and the jury is comprised of people they know and love--with the Professor as the foreman. It's a DreamSequence, leading to the body of the story (who causing mayhem in Townsville--or could it be the girls themselves?).
[[/folder]]

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