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* ''VideoGame/TheLordOfTheRingsBattleForMiddleEarth'' uses the same system as the Generals example above. They were made by the same developers and on the same engine, so this is unsurprising. They are referred to as "Ring Powers".

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* ''VideoGame/TheLordOfTheRingsBattleForMiddleEarth'' ''VideoGame/TheBattleForMiddleEarth'' uses the same system as the Generals example above. They were made by the same developers and on the same engine, so this is unsurprising. They are referred to as "Ring Powers".


** For instance, building an Airfield in ''[=RA1=]'' would allow the Soviets to send a spy plane to reveal parts of the map, or drop paratroopers or [[DeathFromAbove Para]][[AwesomeButImpractical bombs]]. Plus there's the [[NukeEm Su]][[KillSat per]][[WeatherControlMachine wea]][[TeleportersAndTransporters pons]] in each game, available after building the last building on the techtree.

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** For instance, building an Airfield in ''[=RA1=]'' would allow the Soviets to send a spy plane to reveal parts of the map, or drop paratroopers or [[DeathFromAbove Para]][[AwesomeButImpractical bombs]]. Plus there's the [[NukeEm Su]][[KillSat per]][[WeatherControlMachine wea]][[TeleportersAndTransporters wea]][[{{Teleportation}} pons]] in each game, available after building the last building on the techtree.


* In ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'', in which you play a "Summoner" controlling a champion for use as an avatar, each player gets two slots for these powers and has to choose which of about 10 spells s/he is going to bring. They range from "Immediate champion healing" to "FlashStep" to "KillItWithFire," and many of them can only be deployed in a certain range around your champion.
* Not an RTS, but in ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars [[VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsOriginalGeneration OG Saga:]] VideoGame/EndlessFrontier'', the characters stuck in your back row once you've exceeded ArbitraryHeadcountLimit can do this. (To say nothing of the deep pockets you get for the PartyInMyPocket come the sequel, where rotating back-row support goes hand-in-hand with a separate tier of pure support characters.)


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!!Examples from other genres:
* In ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars [[VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsOriginalGeneration OG Saga:]] VideoGame/EndlessFrontier'', the characters stuck in your back row once you've exceeded ArbitraryHeadcountLimit can do this. (To say nothing of the deep pockets you get for the PartyInMyPocket come the sequel, where rotating back-row support goes hand-in-hand with a separate tier of pure support characters.)
* In ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'', in which you play a "Summoner" controlling a champion for use as an avatar, each player gets two slots for these powers and has to choose which of about 10 spells s/he is going to bring. They range from "Immediate champion healing" to "FlashStep" to "KillItWithFire," and many of them can only be deployed in a certain range around your champion.
* ''VideoGame/{{Hearthstone}}'': Every class has a unique Hero Power, which is a 2 mana (1 mana for the [[MechanicallyUnusualClass Demon Hunter]]) ability that has a minor effect and can be used once a turn. It's very mana inefficient - for example, the Paladin hero power summons a 1/1 minion with no effect, something you can play for 0 mana typically - but costs no card advantage to use. It's also nice when your starting hand is terrible, giving you something to do at the very least.


* Fairies from ''VideoGame/GirlsFrontline'' are drones with ([[CloudCuckoolander often quirky]]) onboard [=AIs=] that can grant various tactical and strategic bonuses, ranging from giving buffs from your T-Dolls, calling off-map artillery support, or allowing echelons to paradrop in the middle of hostile territory. Using these abilities costs certain amounts of "Support Order", which regenerates over time. In addition to skills, fairies also have a randomly-activated talent as well as passive buffs to the echelon they're attached to. Like T-Dolls and equipment, the primary way to obtain them is through production, and their skills, talents, and general stats can be improved through various means.

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* Fairies from ''VideoGame/GirlsFrontline'' are drones with ([[CloudCuckoolander often quirky]]) onboard [=AIs=] that can grant various tactical hybrid of the Point Buy and strategic bonuses, Building categories. The primary way to obtain fairies is by crafting them through Heavy Equipment Production. Depending on the particular fairy in question, they have abilities ranging from giving buffs from to your T-Dolls, calling in off-map artillery support, or allowing echelons an echelon to paradrop in the middle of a hostile territory. Using Activating these abilities costs cost certain amounts of "Support Order", Orders", which regenerates over time. In addition regenerate overtime up to skills, fairies also have a randomly-activated talent as well as passive buffs cap. It is possible to improve this cap and regeneration rate by upgrading furniture in the echelon they're attached to. Like T-Dolls and equipment, the primary way to obtain them is through production, and their skills, talents, and general stats can be improved through various means.
Fairy Lodge screen.



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* Fairies from ''VideoGame/GirlsFrontline'' are drones with ([[CloudCuckoolander often quirky]]) onboard [=AIs=] that can grant various tactical and strategic bonuses, ranging from giving buffs from your T-Dolls, calling off-map artillery support, or allowing echelons to paradrop in the middle of hostile territory. Using these abilities costs certain amounts of "Support Order", which regenerates over time. In addition to skills, fairies also have a randomly-activated talent as well as passive buffs to the echelon they're attached to. Like T-Dolls and equipment, the primary way to obtain them is through production, and their skills, talents, and general stats can be improved through various means.


* In ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'', in which you play a "Summoner" controlling a champion for use as an avatar, each player gets two slots for these powers and has to choose which of about 10 spells s/he is going to bring. They range from "Immediate champion healing" to "BackFromTheDead" to "Shield all buildings" to "KillItWithFire," and many of them can only be deployed in a certain range around your champion.

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* In ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'', in which you play a "Summoner" controlling a champion for use as an avatar, each player gets two slots for these powers and has to choose which of about 10 spells s/he is going to bring. They range from "Immediate champion healing" to "BackFromTheDead" to "Shield all buildings" "FlashStep" to "KillItWithFire," and many of them can only be deployed in a certain range around your champion.

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* In the Napoleonic era grand strategy war game ''VideoGame/MarchOfTheEagles'', the map is centered on Europe with most of the rest of the world being cut off from view. Certain countries that had overseas colonies at the time, such as the United Kingdom and Spain, receive economic bonuses to represent the wealth flowing in from their off-screen colonies.



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* In Dawn of War 2, each race generates a unique tertiary resource (ex, Waaagh! for Orks or Synapse for Tyranids) that is spent on such things as summoning turrets or deep-striking teleporting units.


* ''LordOfTheRings: Battle For Middle Earth'' uses the same system as the Generals example above. They were made by the same developers and on the same engine, so this is unsurprising. They are referred to as "Ring Powers".
* ''CompanyOfHeroes'' has these, referred to as "Doctrinal abilities", but they all have a monetary cost associated with them. The abilities you can select from are determined by your choice of "Doctrine" at the start of each match.

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* ''LordOfTheRings: Battle For Middle Earth'' ''VideoGame/TheLordOfTheRingsBattleForMiddleEarth'' uses the same system as the Generals example above. They were made by the same developers and on the same engine, so this is unsurprising. They are referred to as "Ring Powers".
* ''CompanyOfHeroes'' ''VideoGame/CompanyOfHeroes'' has these, referred to as "Doctrinal abilities", but they all have a monetary cost associated with them. The abilities you can select from are determined by your choice of "Doctrine" at the start of each match.



* The Terrans in ''{{Starcraft}}'' has several types of these, most notably the ability to reveal any part of the map on command, and another which allowed you to use [[SlapOnTheWristNuke nuclear warfare]] to take big chunks out of an enemy base.
* In ''{{SWINE}}'', if you have Strategic Points left over which you did not spend before the mission, you can use it to buy additional units (which are airlifted in by a helicopter) or call in bombers via your command car to launch airstrikes against specific targets.


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* The Terrans in ''{{Starcraft}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Starcraft}}'' has several types of these, most notably the ability to reveal any part of the map on command, and another which allowed you to use [[SlapOnTheWristNuke nuclear warfare]] to take big chunks out of an enemy base.
* In ''{{SWINE}}'', ''VideoGame/{{SWINE}}'', if you have Strategic Points left over which you did not spend before the mission, you can use it to buy additional units (which are airlifted in by a helicopter) or call in bombers via your command car to launch airstrikes against specific targets.



* ''Command and Conquer'' series comes up again. There are too many examples of mission specific off-map support powers being granted to name them all. These go all the way back to the original, where you could call in A10 Thunderbolt strikes after you eliminated all enemy SAM sites in singleplayer missions (well actually, when you eliminated each enemy SAM site once).

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* ''Command and Conquer'' ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer'' series comes up again. There are too many examples of mission specific off-map support powers being granted to name them all. These go all the way back to the original, where you could call in A10 Thunderbolt strikes after you eliminated all enemy SAM sites in singleplayer missions (well actually, when you eliminated each enemy SAM site once).



* ''RiseOfNations'' and ''RiseOfLegends'', in which each race's "National Power" is unlocked (and strengthened) solely by research topics. Research is integral to the GUI, so they can't be taken away from you.

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* ''RiseOfNations'' ''VideoGame/RiseOfNations'' and ''RiseOfLegends'', ''VideoGame/RiseOfLegends'', in which each race's "National Power" is unlocked (and strengthened) solely by research topics. Research is integral to the GUI, so they can't be taken away from you.



* The "Tactical Aids" in ''WorldInConflict'' are essentially Miscellaneous, though their costs vary depending on your role in multiplayer. They also have a recharge timer and don't come into effect as fast as in most other games (except for the scan, which is immediate).

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* The "Tactical Aids" in ''WorldInConflict'' ''VideoGame/WorldInConflict'' are essentially Miscellaneous, though their costs vary depending on your role in multiplayer. They also have a recharge timer and don't come into effect as fast as in most other games (except for the scan, which is immediate).



* ''{{Achron}}'''s various time-manipulating abilities. They're so integrated into the gameplay mechanics and interface that it's easy to forget they are even support powers.

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* ''{{Achron}}'''s ''VideoGame/{{Achron}}'''s various time-manipulating abilities. They're so integrated into the gameplay mechanics and interface that it's easy to forget they are even support powers.


* In ''LeagueOfLegends'', in which you play a "Summoner" controlling a champion for use as an avatar, each player gets two slots for these powers and has to choose which of about 10 spells s/he is going to bring. They range from "Immediate champion healing" to "BackFromTheDead" to "Shield all buildings" to "KillItWithFire," and many of them can only be deployed in a certain range around your champion.

to:

* In ''LeagueOfLegends'', ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'', in which you play a "Summoner" controlling a champion for use as an avatar, each player gets two slots for these powers and has to choose which of about 10 spells s/he is going to bring. They range from "Immediate champion healing" to "BackFromTheDead" to "Shield all buildings" to "KillItWithFire," and many of them can only be deployed in a certain range around your champion.


* ''{{Warhammer 40000}}: Rites of War'' let you buy strategies in between battles in the campaign mode. Most of these provided one-shot benefits like calling in an orbital bombardment, immediately breaking the morale of a given enemy unit, mining the ground in a specific terrain hex, and so forth; a couple were provided passive benefits throughout the battle, like giving each unit a bonus to leadership or initiative throughout the scenario.


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* ''{{Warhammer ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}: Rites of War'' let you buy strategies in between battles in the campaign mode. Most of these provided one-shot benefits like calling in an orbital bombardment, immediately breaking the morale of a given enemy unit, mining the ground in a specific terrain hex, and so forth; a couple were provided passive benefits throughout the battle, like giving each unit a bonus to leadership or initiative throughout the scenario.

scenario.


* ''DawnOfWar: Dark Crusade'' has several of these; the {{Space Marine}}s have a satellite relay building that calls in [[KillSat Orbital Bombardment]], but the Tau "Air Caste Strike" is granted by a unit, the Ethereal.

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* ''DawnOfWar: ''VideoGame/DawnOfWar: Dark Crusade'' has several of these; the {{Space Marine}}s have a satellite relay building that calls in [[KillSat Orbital Bombardment]], but the Tau "Air Caste Strike" is granted by a unit, the Ethereal.


* ''{{Dune}} 2'' has the "Fremen attack", which makes Fremen appear and charge at a specific target. You get it from building a Palace.

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* ''{{Dune}} 2'' ''VideoGame/DuneII'' has the "Fremen attack", which makes Fremen appear and charge at a specific target. You get it from building a Palace.


* ''CommandAndConquer'', Red Alert, [=RA2=], YR, C&C3 had these. They usually came in the form of a dedicated building that provides it early on in the series life, but in C&C3 they mostly secondary functions of buildings necessary to climb your TechTree.
** For instance, building an Airfield in [=RA1=] would allow the Soviets to send a spy plane to reveal parts of the map, or drop paratroopers or [[DeathFromAbove Para]][[AwesomeButImpractical bombs]]. Plus there's the [[NukeEm Su]][[KillSat per]][[WeatherControlMachine wea]][[TeleportersAndTransporters pons]] in each game, available after building the last building on the techtree.

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* ''CommandAndConquer'', Red Alert, [=RA2=], YR, C&C3 ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert, [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert2 RA2, YR]], [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberiumWars C&C3]]'' had these. They usually came in the form of a dedicated building that provides it early on in the series life, but in C&C3 they mostly secondary functions of buildings necessary to climb your TechTree.
** For instance, building an Airfield in [=RA1=] ''[=RA1=]'' would allow the Soviets to send a spy plane to reveal parts of the map, or drop paratroopers or [[DeathFromAbove Para]][[AwesomeButImpractical bombs]]. Plus there's the [[NukeEm Su]][[KillSat per]][[WeatherControlMachine wea]][[TeleportersAndTransporters pons]] in each game, available after building the last building on the techtree.

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