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* ''Series/DoomPatrol'' has an episode set in one. [[spoiler: Actually a hallucination created by a demented telepathic former hero.]]

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* ''Series/DoomPatrol'' ''Series/DoomPatrol2019'' has an episode set in one. [[spoiler: Actually a hallucination created by a demented telepathic former hero.]]

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* ''Series/DoomPatrol'' has an episode set in one. [[spoiler: Actually a hallucination created by a demented telepathic former hero.]]


* ''VideoGame/CommunityCollegeHero'' has three schools. The school you're attending to is a school for wannabe heroes.

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* ''VideoGame/CommunityCollegeHero'' has three schools. The school one you're attending to is a new school for wannabe heroes.heroes without enough power to warrant the attention of the more prestigious schools.



* In ''WesternAnimation/DCSuperHeroGirls'' Super Hero High School fits this trope

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* In ''WesternAnimation/DCSuperHeroGirls'' Super Hero High School fits this tropetrope. The newer version of the series averts this trope, with all the heroes going to a normal school in their secret identities.


* In ''Literature/TheSecretsOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool'', Drearcliff Grange is a 1930s girls' school which takes "talented" students. Combined with BoardingSchoolOfHorrors for a parody of Girls' School stories of the period. (Incidentally, the headmistress makes it clear that she doesn't much care if one of her girls becomes a super''villain'' instead of a super''hero'', just so long as she makes use of her talent and doesn't settle for being mundane. ''Literature/TheHauntingOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool'' suggests that girls are at least ''encouraged'' to be a Paladin rather than a Wrong 'Un, and introduces Drearcliff's AcademyOfEvil counterpart Draycott's School of Reform.)

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* In ''Literature/TheSecretsOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool'', Drearcliff Grange is a 1930s girls' school which takes "talented" students. Combined with BoardingSchoolOfHorrors for a parody of Girls' School stories of the period. (Incidentally, the headmistress makes it clear that she doesn't much care if one of her girls becomes a super''villain'' instead of a super''hero'', just so long as she makes use of her talent and doesn't settle for being mundane. ''Literature/TheHauntingOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool'' suggests that girls are at least ''encouraged'' to be a Paladin rather than a Wrong 'Un, and introduces Drearcliff's AcademyOfEvil counterpart Draycott's School House of Reform.)


* In ''Literature/TheSecretsOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool'', Drearcliff Grange is a 1930s girls' school which takes "talented" students. Combined with BoardingSchoolOfHorrors for a parody of Girls' School stories of the period. (Incidentally, the headmistress makes it clear that she doesn't much care if one of her girls becomes a super''villain'' instead of a super''hero'', just so long as she makes use of her talent and doesn't settle for being mundane. ''Literature/TheHauntingOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool, suggests that girls are at least ''encouraged'' to be a Paladin rather than a Wrong 'Un, and introduces Drearcliff's AcademyOfEvil counterpart Draycott's School of Reform.)

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* In ''Literature/TheSecretsOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool'', Drearcliff Grange is a 1930s girls' school which takes "talented" students. Combined with BoardingSchoolOfHorrors for a parody of Girls' School stories of the period. (Incidentally, the headmistress makes it clear that she doesn't much care if one of her girls becomes a super''villain'' instead of a super''hero'', just so long as she makes use of her talent and doesn't settle for being mundane. ''Literature/TheHauntingOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool, ''Literature/TheHauntingOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool'' suggests that girls are at least ''encouraged'' to be a Paladin rather than a Wrong 'Un, and introduces Drearcliff's AcademyOfEvil counterpart Draycott's School of Reform.)


* In ''Literature/TheSecretsOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool'', Drearcliff Grange is a 1930s girls' school which takes "talented" students. Combined with BoardingSchoolOfHorrors for a parody of Girls' School stories of the period. (Incidentally, the headmistress makes it clear that she doesn't much care if one of her girls becomes a super''villain'' instead of a super''hero'', just so long as she makes use of her talent and doesn't settle for being mundane. ''Literature/TheHauntingOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool, suggests that girls are at least ''encouraged'' to be a Paladin rather than a Wrong 'Un, and introduces Drearcliff's SchoolOfEvil counterpart Draycott's School of Reform.)

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* In ''Literature/TheSecretsOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool'', Drearcliff Grange is a 1930s girls' school which takes "talented" students. Combined with BoardingSchoolOfHorrors for a parody of Girls' School stories of the period. (Incidentally, the headmistress makes it clear that she doesn't much care if one of her girls becomes a super''villain'' instead of a super''hero'', just so long as she makes use of her talent and doesn't settle for being mundane. ''Literature/TheHauntingOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool, suggests that girls are at least ''encouraged'' to be a Paladin rather than a Wrong 'Un, and introduces Drearcliff's SchoolOfEvil AcademyOfEvil counterpart Draycott's School of Reform.)


* In ''Literature/TheSecretsOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool'', Drearcliff Grange is a 1930s girls' school which takes "talented" students. Combined with BoardingSchoolOfHorrors for a parody of Girls' School stories of the period. (Incidentally, the headmistress makes it clear that she doesn't much care if one of her girls becomes a super''villain'' instead of a super''hero'', just so long as she makes use of her talent and doesn't settle for being mundane.)

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* In ''Literature/TheSecretsOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool'', Drearcliff Grange is a 1930s girls' school which takes "talented" students. Combined with BoardingSchoolOfHorrors for a parody of Girls' School stories of the period. (Incidentally, the headmistress makes it clear that she doesn't much care if one of her girls becomes a super''villain'' instead of a super''hero'', just so long as she makes use of her talent and doesn't settle for being mundane. ''Literature/TheHauntingOfDrearcliffGrangeSchool, suggests that girls are at least ''encouraged'' to be a Paladin rather than a Wrong 'Un, and introduces Drearcliff's SchoolOfEvil counterpart Draycott's School of Reform.)


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->''"Welcome to Mutant High."''
-->-- '''[[ComicBook/IceMan Bobby]] to ComicBook/{{Rogue}}''', ''Film/XMen''


* ''Literature/SuperPowereds'' has five universities in the US that offer the Hero Certification Program for Supers, who wish to become fully-licensed Heroes. The tetralogy is focused on the HCP at Lander University (Lander, CA), although the others are mentioned in spin-offs and on the author's website: Korman University (BigApplesauce), Sizemore Tech (Chicago), West Private University (Orlando), and Overton University (Overton, TX). Other countries have varying means of certifying Supers for Hero work, and there are no international agreements to allow Heroes to operate internationally. HCP involves TrainingFromHell in order to weed out the merely willing from the willing and able. Hundreds of Supers apply each year, only scores are accepted into each school's HCP, only to either quit or be cut from the program. It's possible for those, who haven't made the cut for next year to re-apply, competing with students from the year behind them for spots. Each school graduates only ten Heroes per year. Besides regular (non-Super) classes, HCP students also have several hours of exhausting gym each day to prepare their bodies and to hone their fighting skills. Additionally, as the HCP students advance in years, their classes grow more specialized based on their abilities and powers. Also, while in in the program, students are required to keep the fact that they're in the HCP (or even that they're Supers) a secret from everyone outside the program, which means they can't use their powers in public or attract unwanted attention. HCP facilities are typically located underground, away from prying eyes, with elevators leading to it from dorms with HCP students. During graduation, each new Hero wears a ceremonial white cape. Also, this is where they register their new Hero names (names have to be unique, except in case of legacy names, but those require permission from the original). After that, recent graduates are required to undergo a two-year internship under an experienced Hero.

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* ''Literature/SuperPowereds'' has five universities in the US that offer the Hero Certification Program for Supers, who wish to become fully-licensed Heroes. The tetralogy is focused on the HCP at Lander University (Lander, CA), although the others are mentioned in spin-offs and on the author's website: Korman University (BigApplesauce), Sizemore Tech (Chicago), West Private University (Orlando), and Overton University (Overton, TX). Other countries have varying means of certifying Supers for Hero work, and there are no international agreements to allow Heroes to operate internationally. HCP involves TrainingFromHell in order to weed out the merely willing from the willing and able. Hundreds of Supers apply each year, only scores are accepted into each school's HCP, only to either quit or be cut from the program. It's possible for those, who haven't made the cut for next year to re-apply, competing with students from the year behind them for spots. Each school graduates only ten Heroes per year. Besides regular (non-Super) classes, HCP students also have several hours of exhausting gym each day to prepare their bodies and to hone their fighting skills. Additionally, as the HCP students advance in years, their classes grow more specialized based on their abilities and powers.powers (Close Combat, Ranged Combat, Weapons, Focus, Control, and Subtlety). Also, while in in the program, students are required to keep the fact that they're in the HCP (or even that they're Supers) a secret from everyone outside the program, which means they can't use their powers in public or attract unwanted attention. HCP facilities are typically located underground, away from prying eyes, with elevators leading to it from dorms with HCP students. During graduation, each new Hero wears a ceremonial white cape. Also, this is where they register their new Hero names (names have to be unique, except in case of legacy names, but those require permission from the original). After that, recent graduates are required to undergo a two-year internship under an experienced Hero.


Often inverted by introducing a [[AcademyOfEvil super]]''[[AcademyOfEvil villain]]'' [[AcademyOfEvil school]]. You will also see instances where the school takes a neutral posture about heroism or villainy, focusing on teaching the students to control and make the most of their superpowers.

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Often inverted by introducing a [[AcademyOfEvil super]]''[[AcademyOfEvil villain]]'' [[AcademyOfEvil school]]. You will also see instances where the school takes a neutral posture about heroism or villainy, focusing on teaching the students to control and make the most of their superpowers.
superpowers - with the result that aspiring heroes end up in classes next to wannabee villains, possibly among a larger group of kids who [[IJustWantToBeNormal just want to get on with their lives]].


Often inverted by introducing a [[AcademyOfEvil super]]''[[AcademyOfEvil villain]]'' [[AcademyOfEvil school]].

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Often inverted by introducing a [[AcademyOfEvil super]]''[[AcademyOfEvil villain]]'' [[AcademyOfEvil school]].
school]]. You will also see instances where the school takes a neutral posture about heroism or villainy, focusing on teaching the students to control and make the most of their superpowers.


* ''Gladstone's School for World Conquerors'' by Mark Andrew Smith and Armand Villavert, a comic series published by Image Comics in 2011 and collected as a graphic novel in 2012. Though this series also arguably fits in the ''Academy of Evil'' category, there are (spoiler) reasons why it also belongs here.

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* ''Gladstone's School for World Conquerors'' ''ComicBook/GladstonesSchoolForWorldConquerors'' by Mark Andrew Smith and Armand Villavert, a comic series published by Image Comics in 2011 and collected as a graphic novel in 2012. Though this series also arguably fits in the ''Academy of Evil'' category, there are (spoiler) reasons why it also belongs here.


* One main setting for ''Manga/MyHeroAcademia'' is the Hero Academy named U.A. This is where the main character learns to fight villains and train 'n stuff. It's really similar to the DWMA from ''Soul Eater''. There are also others out there, but U.A. is the most prestigious of them all.

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* One The main setting for ''Manga/MyHeroAcademia'' is the Hero Academy named U.A. This is where the main character learns to fight villains and train 'n stuff. It's really similar to the DWMA from ''Soul Eater''. There are also others out there, but U.A. is the most prestigious of them all.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/DCSuperHeroGirls'' Super Hero High School fits this trope

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