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* ''Webcomic/MagicalBoy'' is a DeconstructiveParody of the MagicalGirl genre; the titular magical boy, Max, is a transgender boy who comes out on his 16th birthday, which happens to be the same day he becomes the latest to succeed the previously female-exclusive role of a Goddess, a divine role dedicated to saving humanity. The series explores how he navigates his life as a trans teen, on top of handling his job as a Goddess.

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* In ''Literature/TheMigaxCycle'', most of the important protagonists are LGBTQ+, with Leafsong being bisexual, Summer being a lesbian, and Moonwafer being asexual.


* ''Webcomic/NeoKosmos'' takes place in the distant future, where Earth had been destroyed and the only remaining humans are children raised by alien scientists for their research. Those aliens are a OneGenderRace who use gender-neutral pronouns in most situations and leave the children to identity however they want. Most of them settle on being agender and use neutral pronouns as they have little interest in the whole "gender" thing, except for Iris. She, after research into old Earth culture, realizes that she's a girl; everyone, including the aliens, respects this. The fact that she's a "human type XY" and by modern standards transgender is a non-issue for them.



* ''Webcomic/ArthurKingOfTimeAndSpace'' has elements of this in the contemporary and space arcs, including making Tristan female but still in a relationship with Isolde, making Bedivere a transman in a relationship with Kay, and making Galehaut's hero worship of Lancelot explicitly a romantic longing stimmied by IncompatibleOrientation (the baseline arc also has this, but mostly leaves it implicit, which some would say is exactly the same as the source texts). Also it turns out [[spoiler: Arthur loves Lancelot in the same way as he does Guenevere]].



* ''Webcomic/ArthurKingOfTimeAndSpace'' has elements of this in the contemporary and space arcs, including making Tristan female but still in a relationship with Isolde, making Bedivere a transman in a relationship with Kay, and making Galehaut's hero worship of Lancelot explicitly a romantic longing stimmied by IncompatibleOrientation (the baseline arc also has this, but mostly leaves it implicit, which some would say is exactly the same as the source texts). Also it turns out [[spoiler: Arthur loves Lancelot in the same way as he does Guenevere]].

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* ''Webcomic/ArthurKingOfTimeAndSpace'' has elements ''Webcomic/LeifAndThorn'': Part of this the fantasy-culture worldbuilding is that "same-gender relationships are seen as unremarkable, and sex-related dysphoria is seen as a medical condition to be treated without stigma," one or both of which is demonstrated with most of the characters.
* ''Webcomic/NeoKosmos'' takes place
in the contemporary distant future, where Earth had been destroyed and space arcs, the only remaining humans are children raised by alien scientists for their research. Those aliens are a OneGenderRace who use gender-neutral pronouns in most situations and leave the children to identity however they want. Most of them settle on being agender and use neutral pronouns as they have little interest in the whole "gender" thing, except for Iris. She, after research into old Earth culture, realizes that she's a girl; everyone, including making Tristan female but still in the aliens, respects this. The fact that she's a relationship with Isolde, making Bedivere a transman in a relationship with Kay, "human type XY" and making Galehaut's hero worship of Lancelot explicitly a romantic longing stimmied by IncompatibleOrientation (the baseline arc also has this, but mostly leaves it implicit, which some would say modern standards transgender is exactly the same as the source texts). Also it turns out [[spoiler: Arthur loves Lancelot in the same way as he does Guenevere]].a non-issue for them.


* Military science fiction ''Literature/{{Victoria}}'' has Azania, a transhumanist, lesbian LadyLand, as part of its futuristic setting. The author objectifies the Azanians comparatively little, however, being more interested in their state's sociology and politics, as well as the tactical implications of an [[AmazonBrigade all-female military]].


* ''Webcomic/ArthurKingOfTimeAndSpace'' has elements of this in the contemporary and space arcs, including making Tristan female but still in a relationship with Isolde, making Bedivere a transman in a relationship with Kay, and making Galehaut's hero worship of Lancelot explicitly a romantic longing stimmied by IncompatableOrientation (the baseline arc also has this, but mostly leaves it implicit, which some would say is exactly the same as the source texts). Also it turns out [[spoiler: Arthur loves Lancelot in the same way as he does Guenevere]].

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* ''Webcomic/ArthurKingOfTimeAndSpace'' has elements of this in the contemporary and space arcs, including making Tristan female but still in a relationship with Isolde, making Bedivere a transman in a relationship with Kay, and making Galehaut's hero worship of Lancelot explicitly a romantic longing stimmied by IncompatableOrientation IncompatibleOrientation (the baseline arc also has this, but mostly leaves it implicit, which some would say is exactly the same as the source texts). Also it turns out [[spoiler: Arthur loves Lancelot in the same way as he does Guenevere]].

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** Also used when the bisexual John Constantine joins the cast, including making minor character Gary BiTheWay by revealing they're exes. John's driving force in season 4 is the death of his lover Desmond.


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* ''Webcomic/ArthurKingOfTimeAndSpace'' has elements of this in the contemporary and space arcs, including making Tristan female but still in a relationship with Isolde, making Bedivere a transman in a relationship with Kay, and making Galehaut's hero worship of Lancelot explicitly a romantic longing stimmied by IncompatableOrientation (the baseline arc also has this, but mostly leaves it implicit, which some would say is exactly the same as the source texts). Also it turns out [[spoiler: Arthur loves Lancelot in the same way as he does Guenevere]].


* ''Series/TheFlash2014'': In [[LotusEaterMachine the dream-world induced]] by TheMusicMeister in season 3, dream!Iris [[HasTwoMommies has two gay dads]] -- this also being TheRoaringTwenties -- and it is treated as normal. It seems to, therefore, discuss the trope, with the dream world being an SF setting in itself and also conjured up between the minds of [[ComicBook/TheFlash Barry]], [[ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} Kara]], and [[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold the Music Meister]], who are a meta-human, alien, and fifth-dimensional being, respectively. Both the setting and all the minds that it was created from are not (at least not entirely) earthly and so of course being gay is fine in 1920s America.

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* ''Series/TheFlash2014'': In [[LotusEaterMachine the dream-world induced]] by TheMusicMeister in season 3, dream!Iris [[HasTwoMommies has two gay dads]] -- this also being TheRoaringTwenties -- and it is treated as normal. It seems to, therefore, discuss the trope, with the dream world being an SF setting in itself and also conjured up between the minds of [[ComicBook/TheFlash Barry]], [[ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} Kara]], and [[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold the Music Meister]], who are a meta-human, alien, and fifth-dimensional being, respectively. Both the setting and all the minds that it was created from are not (at least not entirely) earthly and so of course being gay is fine in 1920s America. ([[RealityIsUnrealistic Closer to the truth]], at least in some of the more freewheeling and bohemian parts, than you might imagine.)


[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Speculative fiction such as Science Fiction or Fantasy with a heavy emphasis on LGBT themes.]]

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{{Speculative Fiction}} with [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Speculative fiction such as Science Fiction or Fantasy with a heavy emphasis emphasis]] on [[QueerAsTropes LGBT themes.]]
themes]].


** ''Literature/{{Dhalgren}}'': Bisexual protagonist, gay friends, explore the discordian strange small town at the geographic center of the UsefulNotes/UnitedStates. Strange things happen. [[spoiler:The town, and only the town, is somehow in an event horizon]]
** {{Short story}} "[[Literature/DangerousVisions Aye, and Gomorrah...]]": Astronauts get neutered, and given the fact that it's all of them, and they're all off-world so can construct whatever identity they want, develop into being an undefinable gender. Aliens then become sexually attracted to them as this gender, creating a new sexual orientation. Wiki/TheOtherWiki even maintains that "the story allows readers to reflect on the real world while maintaining an estranging distance".

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** ''Literature/{{Dhalgren}}'': Bisexual protagonist, gay friends, explore the discordian strange small town at the geographic center of the UsefulNotes/UnitedStates.United States. Strange things happen. [[spoiler:The town, and only the town, is somehow in an event horizon]]
** {{Short story}} Short story "[[Literature/DangerousVisions Aye, and Gomorrah...]]": Astronauts get neutered, and given the fact that it's all of them, and they're all off-world so can construct whatever identity they want, develop into being an undefinable gender. Aliens then become sexually attracted to them as this gender, creating a new sexual orientation. Wiki/TheOtherWiki even maintains that "the story allows readers to reflect on the real world while maintaining an estranging distance".


Settings commonly used in SpeculativeFiction stories typically fall into the UncannyValley -- that is, they are similar enough to be accessible, but different enough to feel unfamiliar and uncomfortable. Because of (or in order to enable) this, there may be a larger or more prominent group of LGBT+ characters.



Another reason to include non-heteronormative characters in SpeculativeFiction may be to support theories of the future of humanity [[EveryoneIsBi becoming largely bisexual]], and also those that suggest potential alien civilisations [[BizarreAlienSexes may not even have sex as we view it]]. There may be little changed in a [[HumanAliens humanoid alien civilisation]] or TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture, but a difference in view on gender and sexuality (whether global or just authorial) is a sufficient deviation from the norm that it would suggest somewhere very departed from current Earth's climate.

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Another reason to include non-heteronormative characters in SpeculativeFiction may be to support theories of the future of humanity [[EveryoneIsBi becoming largely bisexual]], and also those that suggest potential alien civilisations [[BizarreAlienSexes may not even have sex as we view it]].it]].

It may also be, drawing back to the idea of the Uncanny Valley, being used as a marker in order to separate the SpeculativeFiction world from the real world.
There may be little changed in a [[HumanAliens humanoid alien civilisation]] or TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture, but a difference in view on gender and sexuality (whether global or just authorial) is a sufficient deviation from the norm that it would suggest somewhere very departed from current Earth's climate.



This {{trope}}'s modern UrExample may be either Creator/TheodoreSturgeon's ''The World Well Lost'' (1953), acknowledging sexuality, or Creator/VirginiaWoolf's ''Literature/{{Orlando}}'' (1928), mostly regarding gender[[note]]The {{Ur Example}}s for LesbianVampire may be older, but the early manifestations of that trope were very outwardly using lesbianism as a distinctly negative quality and to further create the monstrosity of vampirism[[/note]]. The latter is discussed on the Encyclopaedia of Fantasy's entry for "[[http://sf-encyclopedia.uk/fe.php?nm=temporal_adventuress Temporal Adventuress]]", which includes many female time-travellers who deviate from conventions of gender and sexuality. Of all the variations upon the Other-ing nature of this trope, the time-travelling lesbian may be one of the most prominent as it allows for no fixed period to be set in which the acceptability is occurring, as well as for the issue to be discussed across past and future times, and perhaps also [[GirlOnGirlIsHot appealing to the presumed audience]] as a bonus.

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This {{trope}}'s trope's modern UrExample may be either Creator/TheodoreSturgeon's ''The World Well Lost'' (1953), acknowledging sexuality, or Creator/VirginiaWoolf's ''Literature/{{Orlando}}'' (1928), mostly regarding gender[[note]]The {{Ur Example}}s for LesbianVampire may be older, but the early manifestations of that trope were very outwardly using lesbianism as a distinctly negative quality and to further create the monstrosity of vampirism[[/note]]. The latter is discussed on the Encyclopaedia of Fantasy's entry for "[[http://sf-encyclopedia.uk/fe.php?nm=temporal_adventuress Temporal Adventuress]]", which includes many female time-travellers who deviate from conventions of gender and sexuality. Of all the variations upon the Other-ing nature of this trope, the time-travelling lesbian may be one of the most prominent as it allows for no fixed period to be set in which the acceptability is occurring, as well as for the issue to be discussed across past and future times, and perhaps also [[GirlOnGirlIsHot appealing to the presumed audience]] as a bonus.

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* The Creator/OrsonScottCard story ''Songmaster'' is described on his page as "Pedophiles InSpace", somewhat accurate but it's more about a beautiful young boy (Ansset) who has the most powerful and honest singing voice in the world (this world being a fantastical future empire) so much that despite being 11, a lot of adult men fall immediately in lust with him. As he ages, Ansset falls in love with Josif, but soon has to deal with the effects of the hormone drugs that were given to him to preserve his voice as he matured (including emasculation and the fact he CantHaveSexEver).


* The Creator/OrsonScottCard story ''Songmaster'' is described on his page as "Pedophiles InSpace", somewhat accurate but it's more about a beautiful young boy (Ansset) who has the most powerful and honest singing voice in the world (this world being a fantastical future empire) so much that despite being 11, a lot of adult men fall immediately in lust with him. As he ages, Ansset falls in love with Josif, but soon has to deal with the effects of the hormone drugs that were given to him to preserve his voice as he matured (including emasculation and the fact he CantHaveSexEver).


* ''Series/{{Defiance}}'': Post-apocalypse humanity seems to think nothing of homosexual relationships, bordering on EveryoneIsBi. Though at least one of the Votan species, the highly patriarchal Castithans, take a dim view of either lesbianism or women cheating on their husbands (it's not entirely sure).

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* ''Series/{{Defiance}}'': Post-apocalypse humanity seems to think nothing of homosexual relationships, bordering on EveryoneIsBi. Though at least one of the Votan species, the highly patriarchal Castithans, take a dim view of either lesbianism or women cheating on their husbands (it's not entirely sure).clear).



** The {{Hugo|Award}}-nominated episode plays with the BuryYourGays trope like a cat with yarn, with this likely being one of the [[BreatherEpisode episode]]'s [[{{Anvilicious}} social commentaries]] given that it's LighterAndSofter than the rest of [[Series/BlackMirror its series]]. It takes the dream beach from ''Film/TheZeroTheorem'', and allows people to infinitely upload their minds there during death, letting wives Kelly and Yorkie have the life together after passing that they can't whilst alive.
** One review also points out that the setting as created with the San Junipero technology as norm legitimises and justifies homosexual relationships, as theoretical "salvation" is possible without the need to live through children [[spoiler:(also enforced by Kelly's daughter's death)]], and it prioritises individual enjoyment. The moral philosophy arm-in-arm with the SF setting has normalised and even promoted homosexuality, which might be more the allusion that Kelly makes when she tells Yorkie that nobody cares anymore (rather than just that it is about 2030).

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** The {{Hugo|Award}}-nominated Hugo-nominated episode plays with the BuryYourGays trope like a cat with yarn, with this likely being one of the [[BreatherEpisode episode]]'s [[{{Anvilicious}} social commentaries]] given that it's LighterAndSofter than the rest of [[Series/BlackMirror its series]]. It takes the dream beach from ''Film/TheZeroTheorem'', and allows people to infinitely upload their minds there during death, letting wives Kelly and Yorkie have the life together after passing that they can't whilst alive.
** One review also points out that the setting as created with the San Junipero technology as norm legitimises legitimizes and justifies homosexual relationships, as theoretical "salvation" is possible without the need to live through children [[spoiler:(also enforced by Kelly's daughter's death)]], and it prioritises individual enjoyment. The moral philosophy arm-in-arm with the SF setting has normalised normalized and even promoted homosexuality, which might be more the allusion that Kelly makes when she tells Yorkie that nobody cares anymore (rather than just that it is about 2030).



* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' is about a team of extraterrestrial warriors who have NoBiologicalSex and feminine coding, reflective of creator Creator/RebeccaSugar's experience as a non-binary woman. The show makes extensive use of the DiscountLesbians angle to [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything explore themes about identity and relationships]] [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar beneath its action-adventure veneer]]. For example, the character of Garnet is a RomanticFusion between to Gems who fell in love when defecting from a Homeworld that values perfection and efficiency above self-expression. Steven himself, being TheOneGuy by way of also being a HalfHumanHybrid, develops the ability to [[FusionDance fuse]] with another Gem or his ImpliedLoveInterest, said fusions having an AmbiguousGender and identifying with singular "they" pronouns (since they aren't exactly singular). Even the circumstances of Steven's birth can be viewed as a loose {{transgender}} metaphor, due to his mother (frustrated with her role and nature in Homeworld society) being well aware that birthing Steven would [[DeathByChildbirth cost her physical form]], and several antagonists initially refusing to see Steven as his own person.

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* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' is about a team of extraterrestrial warriors who have NoBiologicalSex and feminine coding, reflective of creator Creator/RebeccaSugar's experience as a non-binary woman. The show makes extensive use of the DiscountLesbians angle to [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything explore themes about identity and relationships]] [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar beneath its action-adventure veneer]]. For example, the character of Garnet is a RomanticFusion between to Gems who fell in love when defecting from a Homeworld home world that values perfection and efficiency above self-expression. Steven himself, being TheOneGuy by way of also being a HalfHumanHybrid, develops the ability to [[FusionDance fuse]] with another Gem or his ImpliedLoveInterest, said fusions having an AmbiguousGender and identifying with singular "they" pronouns (since they aren't exactly singular). Even the circumstances of Steven's birth can be viewed as a loose {{transgender}} metaphor, due to his mother (frustrated with her role and nature in Homeworld home world society) being well aware that birthing Steven would [[DeathByChildbirth cost her physical form]], and several antagonists initially refusing to see Steven as his own person.


This {{trope}}'s modern UrExample may be either Creator/TheodoreSturgeon's ''Literature/TheWorldWellLost'' (1953), acknowledging sexuality, or Creator/VirginiaWoolf's ''Literature/{{Orlando}}'' (1928), mostly regarding gender[[note]]The {{Ur Example}}s for LesbianVampire may be older, but the early manifestations of that trope were very outwardly using lesbianism as a distinctly negative quality and to further create the monstrosity of vampirism[[/note]]. The latter is discussed on the Encyclopaedia of Fantasy's entry for "[[http://sf-encyclopedia.uk/fe.php?nm=temporal_adventuress Temporal Adventuress]]", which includes many female time-travellers who deviate from conventions of gender and sexuality. Of all the variations upon the Other-ing nature of this trope, the time-travelling lesbian may be one of the most prominent as it allows for no fixed period to be set in which the acceptability is occurring, as well as for the issue to be discussed across past and future times, and perhaps also [[GirlOnGirlIsHot appealing to the presumed audience]] as a bonus.

to:

This {{trope}}'s modern UrExample may be either Creator/TheodoreSturgeon's ''Literature/TheWorldWellLost'' ''The World Well Lost'' (1953), acknowledging sexuality, or Creator/VirginiaWoolf's ''Literature/{{Orlando}}'' (1928), mostly regarding gender[[note]]The {{Ur Example}}s for LesbianVampire may be older, but the early manifestations of that trope were very outwardly using lesbianism as a distinctly negative quality and to further create the monstrosity of vampirism[[/note]]. The latter is discussed on the Encyclopaedia of Fantasy's entry for "[[http://sf-encyclopedia.uk/fe.php?nm=temporal_adventuress Temporal Adventuress]]", which includes many female time-travellers who deviate from conventions of gender and sexuality. Of all the variations upon the Other-ing nature of this trope, the time-travelling lesbian may be one of the most prominent as it allows for no fixed period to be set in which the acceptability is occurring, as well as for the issue to be discussed across past and future times, and perhaps also [[GirlOnGirlIsHot appealing to the presumed audience]] as a bonus.


Settings commonly used in SpeculativeFiction stories typically fall into the UncannyValley -- that is, they are similar enough to be accessible, but different enough to feel unfamiliar and uncomfortable. Because of (or in order to enable) this, there may be a larger or more prominent group of LGBT+ characters.

to:

Settings commonly used in SpeculativeFiction stories typically fall into the UncannyValley -- that is, they are similar enough to be accessible, but different enough to feel unfamiliar and uncomfortable. Because of (or in order to enable) this, there may be a larger [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Speculative fiction such as Science Fiction or more prominent group of LGBT+ characters.
Fantasy with a heavy emphasis on LGBT themes.]]



Another reason to include non-heteronormative characters in SpeculativeFiction may be to support theories of the future of humanity [[EveryoneIsBi becoming largely bisexual]], and also those that suggest potential alien civilisations [[BizarreAlienSexes may not even have sex as we view it]].

It may also be, drawing back to the idea of the Uncanny Valley, being used as a marker in order to separate the SpeculativeFiction world from the real world. There may be little changed in a [[HumanAliens humanoid alien civilisation]] or TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture, but a difference in view on gender and sexuality (whether global or just authorial) is a sufficient deviation from the norm that it would suggest somewhere very departed from current Earth's climate.

to:

Another reason to include non-heteronormative characters in SpeculativeFiction may be to support theories of the future of humanity [[EveryoneIsBi becoming largely bisexual]], and also those that suggest potential alien civilisations [[BizarreAlienSexes may not even have sex as we view it]].

It may also be, drawing back to the idea of the Uncanny Valley, being used as a marker in order to separate the SpeculativeFiction world from the real world.
it]]. There may be little changed in a [[HumanAliens humanoid alien civilisation]] or TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture, but a difference in view on gender and sexuality (whether global or just authorial) is a sufficient deviation from the norm that it would suggest somewhere very departed from current Earth's climate.

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