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* In Creator/NancyKress's ''Crossfire'', this is (or at least is suggested to be) the reason why planets around nearby stars have DNA-based life. Which tends to make things easier for settlers. However, it's shown not to be universal when a plant-like, spacefaring alien species is encountered which is ''not'' DNA-based.

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* In Creator/NancyKress's ''Crossfire'', this ''{{Literature/Crossfire}}'': This is (or at least is suggested to be) the reason why planets around nearby stars have DNA-based life. Which tends to make things easier for settlers. However, it's shown not to be universal when a plant-like, spacefaring alien species is encountered which is ''not'' DNA-based.DNA-based.
* Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Literature/ExtraterrestrialCivilizations'':
** (DiscussedTrope) Life on Earth was begun by spores traveling through the universe is the next theory advanced after spontaneous generation of life is discarded. It,in turn, is also discarded, because of the complications required for such microscopic life to both survive the trip to a second planet in a new solar system and the fact that it merely displaces "how does life originate?" to a different planet.
** A footnote describes how Fred Hoyle has advanced the theory that comets, approaching close enough to Earth's orbit, are the source of viral pandemics.



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* Maury from ''WesternAnimation/BigMouth'' claims that life in Earth started when a giant alien had sex with a hole in the ground.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/Ben10Omniverse'', it's revealed that the universe itself was created by a race of SufficientlyAdvancedAliens from the fifth dimension called the Contemelia, and all life in it arose from a race of unicellular aliens working with them called Slimebiotes.

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->'''Morty''': I didn't know that there were bugs out in space.
->'''Rick''': Well, what did you think, Morty? Life just developed on Earth by itself?
-->-- ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'', "Look Who's Purging"

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** Confirmed in ''Silentium'', ''Mythos'' and ''Warfleet''. The Precursors explored the universe for ''billions'' of years and seeded countless galaxies with the building blocks of life and sped up the evolutionary processes of certain species. It may actually go further than that as ''Silentium'' heavily implies that the Precursors didn't just create life throughout the universe but that they ''created the universe itself''.


** In series XI the crew talk with the Universe itself who backs this by expressing regret over only bothering to make one planet with life on it during it's mid-life crisis.

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** In series XI the crew talk with the Universe itself who backs this by expressing regret over only bothering to make one planet with life on it during it's its mid-life crisis.


** In series XII the crew talk with the Universe itself who backs this by expressing regret over only bothering to make one planet with life on it during it's mid-life crisis.

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** In series XII XI the crew talk with the Universe itself who backs this by expressing regret over only bothering to make one planet with life on it during it's mid-life crisis.

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** In series XII the crew talk with the Universe itself who backs this by expressing regret over only bothering to make one planet with life on it during it's mid-life crisis.


* The more scientific sort is a suggested origin of all life in the Literature/CoDominium universe (at least until ''The Mote in God's Eye'' introduces truly ''alien'' aliens.)

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* The more scientific sort is a suggested origin of all life in the Literature/CoDominium universe (at least until ''The Mote in God's Eye'' ''Literature/TheMoteInGodsEye'' introduces truly ''alien'' aliens.)


* ''The Hainish Cycle'' by Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin used this trope for human and semi-human life, spread by the {{Precursors}} in the title.

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* ''The Hainish Cycle'' The Literature/{{Hainish}} stories by Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin used this trope for human and semi-human life, spread by the {{Precursors}} in the title.


* In Sergey Lukyanenko's ''Literature/ALordFromPlanetEarth'', it is common knowledge among HumanAliens (no StarfishAliens) that life on all of their planers began with intentional panspermia by the mysterious [[{{Precursors}} Seeders]], who also left behind numerous ForgottenTechnology and temples on each planet ([[spoiler:except for Earth]]). What they don't know is that the Seeders are, in fact, [[spoiler:humans from the future, who need an army but do not have the time for a massive breeding program. They send autonomous seeder ships into distant past to spread life and leave behind carefully-selected pieces of technology to accelerate the development of these cultures. They also choose planets in unexplored systems in order to avoid any temporal paradox and ensure that their "children" are unable to get to Earth via conventional means before the time is right]].

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* In Sergey Lukyanenko's ''Literature/ALordFromPlanetEarth'', it is common knowledge among HumanAliens (no StarfishAliens) that life on all of their planers began with intentional panspermia by the mysterious [[{{Precursors}} Seeders]], who also left behind numerous ForgottenTechnology LostTechnology and temples on each planet ([[spoiler:except for Earth]]). What they don't know is that the Seeders are, in fact, [[spoiler:humans from the future, who need an army but do not have the time for a massive breeding program. They send autonomous seeder ships into distant past to spread life and leave behind carefully-selected pieces of technology to accelerate the development of these cultures. They also choose planets in unexplored systems in order to avoid any temporal paradox and ensure that their "children" are unable to get to Earth via conventional means before the time is right]].


* Invoking this trope via exploration, colonization, and eventual terraforming of other worlds is one of the explicit long-term goals of human space research.

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* Invoking this trope via exploration, colonization, and eventual terraforming of other worlds is one of the explicit long-term goals of human space research. If there ''isn't'' already life out there, it'll be up to us to bring it.

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* Invoking this trope via exploration, colonization, and eventual terraforming of other worlds is one of the explicit long-term goals of human space research.

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* ''VideoGame/CorpseOfDiscovery'' sees humanity accidentally seeding an alien world (that may or may not be Earth) after the death of several explorers cultivates new life.

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* In Creator/NancyKress's ''Crossfire'', this is (or at least is suggested to be) the reason why planets around nearby stars have DNA-based life. Which tends to make things easier for settlers. However, it's shown not to be universal when a plant-like, spacefaring alien species is encountered which is ''not'' DNA-based.

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