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* In a post-apocalyptic future of ''Film/SteelDawn'', people still have mullets. This is at least somewhat plausible, as mullets were a common hairstyle as far back as AncientGreece.

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* In a post-apocalyptic future of ''Film/SteelDawn'', people still have mullets. This is at least somewhat plausible, as mullets were a common hairstyle as far back as AncientGreece.UsefulNotes/AncientGreece.

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* ''Spectator Sport'' by John D. [=MacDonald=] opens with the protagonist futilely trying to convince people he's a time traveler from the past. They're not convinced as his clothing is little different from theirs. Turns out society has stagnated because VirtualReality was invented not long after he left.


* Applies to the humans in ''Film/{{Avatar}}'', set in 2154. Apparently, progress stopped after 2003. This also applies to military uniforms. Apparently, modern military fatigues are still standard 150 years from now, even though, historically, uniforms can change pretty fast.



* ''Film/SpaceMutiny'': The fashion of the characters' clothes and hair is ''extremely'' '80s.



* ''Franchise/StarWars'' has this on some planets. While many people wear robes or bulky SpaceClothes, there are many that wear something that resembles our clothing. Dexter Jettster, the diner owner in Episode II, wears something you'd expect a diner owner today to wear, albeit with an extra pair of sleeves. Otherwise, ''StarWars'' is pretty good about averting this trope with clothes, although the characters' hair is incredibly 70s/80s in the Original Trilogy.
** Of course, [[TheEmpire the Galactic Empire]] is PuttingOnTheReich, with drab, militaristic tunics, caps, and knee-high boots, and even helmets (like Vader's) meant to evoke the ''Stahlhelm''.
*** In the final scenes of Episode III, as imperial officers mill about Palpatine and Vader, the 70s aesthetics of their uniforms look a tad dated amid the 2005 set.

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* ''Franchise/StarWars'' has this ''Franchise/StarWars'':
** This is shown
on some planets. While many people wear robes or bulky SpaceClothes, there are many that wear something that resembles our clothing. Dexter Jettster, the diner owner in Episode II, wears something you'd expect a diner owner today to wear, albeit with an extra pair of sleeves. Otherwise, ''StarWars'' is pretty good about averting this trope with clothes, although the characters' hair is incredibly 70s/80s in the Original Trilogy.
** Of course, [[TheEmpire the Galactic Empire]] is PuttingOnTheReich, with drab, militaristic tunics, caps, and knee-high boots, and even helmets (like Vader's) meant to evoke the ''Stahlhelm''.
***
''Stahlhelm''. In the final scenes of Episode III, as imperial Imperial officers mill about Palpatine and Vader, the 70s aesthetics of their uniforms look a tad dated amid the 2005 set.



* Applies to the humans in ''Film/{{Avatar}}'', set in 2154. Apparently, progress stopped after 2003.
** This also applies to military uniforms. Apparently, modern military fatigues are still standard 150 years from now, even though, historically, uniforms can change pretty fast.
* In a post-apocalyptic future of ''Film/SteelDawn'', people still have mullets.
** This is at least somewhat plausible, as mullets were a common hairstyle as far back as AncientGreece.

to:

* Applies to the humans in ''Film/{{Avatar}}'', set in 2154. Apparently, progress stopped after 2003.
** This also applies to military uniforms. Apparently, modern military fatigues are still standard 150 years from now, even though, historically, uniforms can change pretty fast.
* In a post-apocalyptic future of ''Film/SteelDawn'', people still have mullets.
**
mullets. This is at least somewhat plausible, as mullets were a common hairstyle as far back as AncientGreece.


* ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianTwilight Tiberian Twilight]]'' is the first game in [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSeries its series]] that contains FMV of its [[CrapsackWorld civilian world]]...which includes footage of people cladded in 20-century clothes walking among streets that is obviously shot right outside of the studio.

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* ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianTwilight Tiberian Twilight]]'' is the first game in [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSeries its series]] that contains FMV of its [[CrapsackWorld civilian world]]...which includes footage of people cladded clad in 20-century clothes walking among streets that is obviously shot right outside of the studio.studio.
* ''VideoGame/XCOM2'' is set in the late 2030s, twenty years after SufficientlyAdvancedAliens took over the planet and rebuilt all population centers in their image, but what we get to see of civilian and military fashion looks hardly any different from what folks were wearing when the game came out in 2016. Most tellingly, the game's most iconic piece of clothing[[note]]Bradford's memetic, DLC-exclusive sweater notwithstanding[[/note]] is popular MauveShirt Jane Kelly's baseball cap.

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*** The exception in ''Enterprise'' is the "[[SensibleHeroesSkimpyVillains sexily evil]]" female Imperial Starfleet uniforms for the Mirror Universe two-parter, which have a non-more-early-2000s ultra-low-rise BareYourMidriff look that appears incredibly dated now.


** One of the new clothing option in the third game for when it's on-board Normandy is a casual N7 hoodie which isn't out of place for clothing at the time.

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** One of the new clothing option in the third game for when it's on-board Normandy is a casual N7 hoodie which isn't out of place for clothing in real life at the time.time of the game's release (or even today).

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** One of the new clothing option in the third game for when it's on-board Normandy is a casual N7 hoodie which isn't out of place for clothing at the time.


* ''Film/StarTrek'' is generally good at averting this, but there are two notable exceptions: Kirk's brother wearing 2009 era skinny jeans and, in what is most likely an example of the GrandfatherClause, [[TheSixties Sixties]] era miniskirts for female Starfleet uniforms.

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* ''Film/StarTrek'' ''Film/StarTrek2009'' is generally good at averting this, but there are two notable exceptions: Kirk's brother wearing 2009 era skinny jeans and, in what is most likely an example of the GrandfatherClause, [[TheSixties Sixties]] era miniskirts for female Starfleet uniforms.


** In "The Dalek Invasion of Earth", made in 1964, set about 200 years in the future, humans in Dalek-occupied London wear '60s clothes. But they wear work clothes, as befits these grizzled survivors, not trendy suits or hippie clothes or anything, so it's a lot less dated.
** DefiedTrope in "The Ark" with [[SpaceClothes those streamer outfits]].
** "The Ice Warriors", made in 1967, has female scientists in mod minidresses with some outrageously groovy prints, long false eyelashes, beehives and go-go boots. (Especially amusing as the story is set in a future Earth which has gone into an ice age due to human climate change. You would absolutely die of exposure if you went outside dressed like that - which may have been the point). Defied by the men, however, who wear jump-suits with the same prints.
** The AfterTheEnd humans in "The Ark in Space" wear rather sexy 1970s trouser suits. The all-white colour scheme looks unusual now but 1976 was a time when you could get away with that as normal. (Hell, there's even promo pictures of Tom Baker from around this time wearing an all-white suit.)
** Defied interestingly in 1980's "The Leisure Hive", which involved a species whose [[PlanetOfHats hat]] is being businessmen. The costume designer talks about this on the DVD, explaining that since they were businessmen they had to be dressed in suits, but virtually any modernist twist on the suit that she came up with for the design ended up looking like a 60s throwback. Eventually she came up with the idea of using open lapels with multicoloured linings clipped in as a kind of tie replacement, which is something not yet mainstream.

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** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E2TheDalekInvasionOfEarth "The Dalek Invasion of Earth", Earth"]], made in 1964, set about 200 years in the future, humans in Dalek-occupied London wear '60s clothes. But they wear work clothes, as befits these grizzled survivors, not trendy suits or hippie clothes or anything, so it's a lot less dated.
** DefiedTrope in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E6TheArk "The Ark" Ark"]] with [[SpaceClothes those streamer outfits]].
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E3TheIceWarriors "The Ice Warriors", Warriors"]], made in 1967, has female scientists in mod minidresses with some outrageously groovy prints, long false eyelashes, beehives and go-go boots. (Especially amusing as the story is set in a future Earth which has gone into an ice age due to human climate change. You would absolutely die of exposure if you went outside dressed like that - which may have been the point). point.) Defied by the men, however, who wear jump-suits with the same prints.
** The AfterTheEnd humans in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E2TheArkInSpace "The Ark in Space" Space"]] wear rather sexy 1970s trouser suits. The all-white colour scheme looks unusual now now, but 1976 was a time when you could get away with that as normal. (Hell, there's even promo pictures of Tom Baker from around this time wearing an all-white suit.)
** Defied interestingly in 1980's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E1TheLeisureHive "The Leisure Hive", Hive"]], which involved a species whose [[PlanetOfHats hat]] is being businessmen. The costume designer talks about this on the DVD, explaining that since they were businessmen they had to be dressed in suits, but virtually any modernist twist on the suit that she came up with for the design ended up looking like a 60s throwback. Eventually she came up with the idea of using open lapels with multicoloured linings clipped in as a kind of tie replacement, which is something not yet mainstream.


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** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS37E5TheTsurangaConundrum "The Tsuranga Conundrum"]]: Durkas Cicero is wearing a canvas jacket, T-shirt and distressed jeans that wouldn't be out-of-place in the 21st century. This stands out more because the rest of the 67th-century natives are wearing more futuristic styles.


Sometimes it is justified in some specific things, like how many modern hairstyles have been around for centuries (often pointed out in movies), and how men's suits have changed [[http://www.victoriana.com/Mens-Clothing/mens-clothing-1868.html remarkably little in over 140 years]] (albeit going from casual sporting wear, to business dress, to the most formal thing many men will ever put on). More specifically, within the past 60-70 years, styles in suits have entered a more or less cyclical pattern (one decade wide tie, one decade skinny tie, one decade more colors, one decade fewer colors, one decade wide lapel, one decade narrow lapel...) as decades borrow from past ones (witness the ''Series/MadMen'' influence on contemporary fashion). On top of that, jeans have been the youth's casual trousers of choice in North America for some seventy years now (almost a trope of its own). By the same token, the LittleBlackDress has, with minor tweaks, been universally acceptable for women since the 1920s (nearly a century--which by the standards of women's fashion might as well be an eternity). But this isn't the case once enough time has passed. Just compare how different medieval and Roman styles looks from each other; logically fashion two hundred or so years from now on will be just as different. Or just compare [[http://web.archive.org/web/20131009182546/http://www.costumes.org/history/100pages/1900pics.htm women's fashions of 1900]] to now.

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Sometimes it is justified in by some specific things, pieces of TruthInTelevision, like how many modern hairstyles have been around for centuries (often pointed out in movies), and how men's suits have changed [[http://www.victoriana.com/Mens-Clothing/mens-clothing-1868.html remarkably little in over 140 years]] (albeit going from casual sporting wear, to business dress, to the most formal thing many men will ever put on). More specifically, within the past 60-70 years, styles in suits have entered a more or less cyclical pattern (one decade wide tie, one decade skinny tie, one decade more colors, one decade fewer colors, one decade wide lapel, one decade narrow lapel...) as decades borrow from past ones (witness the ''Series/MadMen'' influence on contemporary fashion). On top of that, jeans have been the youth's casual trousers of choice in North America for some seventy years now (almost a trope of its own). By the same token, the LittleBlackDress has, with minor tweaks, been universally acceptable for women since the 1920s (nearly a century--which by the standards of women's fashion might as well be an eternity). But this isn't the case once enough time has passed. Just compare how different medieval and Roman styles looks from each other; logically fashion two hundred or so years from now on will be just as different. Or just compare [[http://web.archive.org/web/20131009182546/http://www.costumes.org/history/100pages/1900pics.htm women's fashions of 1900]] to now.


* In ''Disney/MeetTheRobinsons'', which takes place only 30 years from when the film was released, people have flying cars and [[RobotBuddy robot buddies]]... but kids still wear jeans, t-shirts, and Converse All-Stars. Justified since these fashions had already been in style for so long, and it's certainly not unlikely that they will still be at the story's time.

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* In ''Disney/MeetTheRobinsons'', which takes place only 30 years from when the film was released, people have flying cars cars, talking pets and [[RobotBuddy robot buddies]]... but kids still wear jeans, t-shirts, and Converse All-Stars. Justified since these fashions had already been in style for so long, and it's certainly not unlikely that they will still be at the story's time.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}'' has fashion in the 2070s that wouldn't look out of place in the present. While some styles, like Symmetra and Lucio, are a little further out there, Soldier: 76, Tracer, and Mei all dress like people in modern times. Companion comics and animated shorts reveal that when not in uniform/superhero costumes, people dress more or less like they do now.


** Both ''Cosmic Era'' series also count as at least partial aversions while civilian clothes of the characters aren't unreasonable and wouldn't look ''really'' out of place on the modern streets, they are nevertheless quite unlike any previously observed trends especially visible in the case of Kira Yamato, whom {{fanon}} perceives as a notorious [[TheDandy dandy]]. His penchant for [[HellBentForLeather complex flamboyant leather jackets]] with detached sleeves and lots of [[MemeticMutation belts and zippers]] makes him look less like a ''Gundam'' character, and more like a video game character by TetsuyaNomura.

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** Both ''Cosmic Era'' series also count as at least partial aversions while civilian clothes of the characters aren't unreasonable and wouldn't look ''really'' out of place on the modern streets, they are nevertheless quite unlike any previously observed trends especially visible in the case of Kira Yamato, whom {{fanon}} perceives as a notorious [[TheDandy dandy]]. His penchant for [[HellBentForLeather complex flamboyant leather jackets]] with detached sleeves and lots of [[MemeticMutation belts and zippers]] makes him look less like a ''Gundam'' character, and more like a video game character by TetsuyaNomura.Creator/TetsuyaNomura.


** One of the very few series that breaks this trend is ''Anime/TurnAGundam'', which being more Fantasy oriented than previous series, had a general [[FantasyCounterpartCulture Victorian era setting]]; as a result, characters tended to wear styles based anywhere from the GrandUnifiedTimeline/FirstIndustrialRevolution to UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.

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** One of the very few series that breaks this trend is ''Anime/TurnAGundam'', which being more Fantasy oriented than previous series, had a general [[FantasyCounterpartCulture Victorian era setting]]; as a result, characters tended to wear styles based anywhere from the GrandUnifiedTimeline/FirstIndustrialRevolution UsefulNotes/IndustrialRevolution to UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.


** One of the very few series that breaks this trend is ''Anime/TurnAGundam'', which being more Fantasy oriented than previous series, had a general [[FantasyCounterpartCulture Victorian era setting]]; as a result, characters tended to wear styles based anywhere from the IndustrialRevolution to UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.

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** One of the very few series that breaks this trend is ''Anime/TurnAGundam'', which being more Fantasy oriented than previous series, had a general [[FantasyCounterpartCulture Victorian era setting]]; as a result, characters tended to wear styles based anywhere from the IndustrialRevolution GrandUnifiedTimeline/FirstIndustrialRevolution to UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.

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