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* ''TabletopGame/StarWarsD20'': Player characters fall to the Dark Side and become [=NPCs=] when they accumulate too many Dark Side Points by committing misdeeds or using TheDarkSide of the Force.


* ''TabletopGame/DeltaGreen'' is primarily focused in playing agents of the eponymous organization. However, ''[[GameMaster Handler's]] Guide'' offers advice and tips on how to play a campaign as The Fate (New York-based occultist criminals active from the 1920s unto the early 2000s) and [[TheMenInBlack Majestic-12]].
** In part 1 of the campaign ''Iconoclasts'' [[InvertedTrope inverts thhis trope]], as players are required to play as ''ISIS foreign fighters''.

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* ''TabletopGame/DeltaGreen'' is primarily focused in playing agents of the eponymous organization. However, the ''[[GameMaster Handler's]] Guide'' offers advice and tips on how to play a campaign as The Fate (New York-based occultist criminals active from the 1920s unto the early 2000s) and [[TheMenInBlack Majestic-12]].
MAJESTIC-12]].
** In part 1 of the campaign ''Iconoclasts'' [[InvertedTrope inverts thhis this trope]], as players are required to play as ''ISIS foreign fighters''.


* In ''VideoGame/EvoTheSearchForEden'', you can join up with various evil forces, but if you do, the game just gives you a quick slideshow before kicking you back to the game map.

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* In ''VideoGame/EvoTheSearchForEden'', ''VideoGame/EVOSearchForEden'', you can join up with various evil forces, but if you do, the game just gives you a quick slideshow before kicking you back to the game map.

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* In ''VideoGame/EvoTheSearchForEden'', you can join up with various evil forces, but if you do, the game just gives you a quick slideshow before kicking you back to the game map.

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*** A ''Magazine/{{Dragon}}'' article explained that there was an editorial mandate that all modules for the game, no exceptions, had to be about heroic adventurers.

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*** 5th edition also lists the Oathbreaker subclass for Paladin and Death domain subclass for Clerics in the Dungeon Master's Guide as potential classes for villains, instead of the Player's Handbook. Even then, the book notes that [=DMs=] can allow their player to chose from them (something most do). Xanathar's Guide mostly averts this, since it lists the evil Oath of Conquest.

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* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'': Whether the player is Alliance or Horde, the PVE part is always about vanquishing the expansion's villains and BigBad in the end, save for rare temporary story bits like the Death Knights' [[VideoGameTutorial tutorial]], which sees them rallying the peoples of Azeroth at the end of it anyway.
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* ''Magazine/{{Shadis}}'' magazine #12, article "Just a Matter of Time Part 2: The Retriever Campaign". In the time travel campaign discussed in the article, the PlayerCharacters are agents fighting against terrorists who are trying to change the past to promote their malicious ideologies. The terrorists include the Delta Brigade (Neo-Nazis), [=TaskMasters=] (white supremacists) and Peace Mongers (want to start a nuclear war in the 20th century). Players in the campaign are not allowed to play members of these terrorist groups because of their evil natures and goals.

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* ''Magazine/{{Shadis}}'' magazine #12, article "Just a Matter of Time Part 2: The Retriever Campaign". In the time travel campaign discussed in the article, the PlayerCharacters are agents fighting against terrorists who are trying to change the past to promote their malicious ideologies. The terrorists include the Delta Brigade (Neo-Nazis), (neo-Nazis), [=TaskMasters=] (white supremacists) and Peace Mongers (want to start a nuclear war in the 20th century). Players in the campaign are not allowed to play members of these terrorist groups because of their evil natures and goals.


* ''Magazine/{{Shadis}}'' magazine #12, article "Just a Matter of Time Part 2: The Retriever Campaign". In the time travel campaign discussed in the article, the PlayerCharacters are agents fighting against terrorists who are trying to change the past to promote their ideologies. Players in the campaign are not allowed to play members of the terrorist groups because of their evil natures and goals.

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* ''Magazine/{{Shadis}}'' magazine #12, article "Just a Matter of Time Part 2: The Retriever Campaign". In the time travel campaign discussed in the article, the PlayerCharacters are agents fighting against terrorists who are trying to change the past to promote their malicious ideologies. The terrorists include the Delta Brigade (Neo-Nazis), [=TaskMasters=] (white supremacists) and Peace Mongers (want to start a nuclear war in the 20th century). Players in the campaign are not allowed to play members of the these terrorist groups because of their evil natures and goals.

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* ''Magazine/{{Shadis}}'' magazine #12, article "Just a Matter of Time Part 2: The Retriever Campaign". In the time travel campaign discussed in the article, the PlayerCharacters are agents fighting against terrorists who are trying to change the past to promote their ideologies. Players in the campaign are not allowed to play members of the terrorist groups because of their evil natures and goals.


This is especially obvious in WWII-themed FirstPersonShooter games; it is usually the case that even though you can play both the Allied and the Axis sides in multiplayer, the single-player campaign allows you to play only as the Allied side. Whether this is because developers believe that given that they're, well, [[ThoseWackyNazis Nazis]] players will not or should not be allowed to play as the bad guys, or because historically they lost and they feel that [[GodwinsLawOfTimeTravel leading them to victory feels a bit weird]] is difficult to say, but it is worth noting that RealTimeStrategy games, flight sims, tactical wargames and grand strategy games usually allow you to play the Axis in single-player mode. This may have something to do with the player being more removed from the action in those types of games as well as just how awesome German ''machinery'' were.

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This is especially obvious in WWII-themed FirstPersonShooter games; it is usually the case that even though you can play both the Allied and the Axis sides in multiplayer, the single-player campaign allows you to play only as the Allied side. Whether this is because developers believe that given that they're, their, well, [[ThoseWackyNazis Nazis]] players will not or should not be allowed to play as the bad guys, or because historically they lost and they feel that [[GodwinsLawOfTimeTravel leading them to victory feels a bit weird]] is difficult to say, but it is worth noting that RealTimeStrategy games, flight sims, tactical wargames and grand strategy games usually allow you to play the Axis in single-player mode. This may have something to do with the player being more removed from the action in those types of games as well as just how awesome German ''machinery'' were.


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* The ''TabletopGame/{{Alternity}}'' game's ''TabletopGame/StarDrive'' setting. In ''Magazine/{{Polyhedron}}'' magazine #139, the RPGA (Role Playing Game Association) declared that its "Living Verge" campaign would not allow PlayerCharacters who possessed the moral attitudes Despicable of Unscrupulous or the trait Amoral. In other words, they weren't allowed to be the ''TabletopGame/StarDrive'' version of evil.

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* The ''TabletopGame/{{Alternity}}'' game's ''TabletopGame/StarDrive'' setting. In ''Magazine/{{Polyhedron}}'' magazine #139, the RPGA (Role Playing Game Association) declared that its "Living Verge" campaign would not allow PlayerCharacters who possessed the moral attitudes Despicable of or Unscrupulous or the trait Amoral. In other words, they weren't allowed to be the ''TabletopGame/StarDrive'' version of evil.


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[[/folder]]* The ''TabletopGame/{{Alternity}}'' game's ''TabletopGame/StarDrive'' setting. In ''Magazine/{{Polyhedron}}'' magazine #139, the RPGA (Role Playing Game Association) declared that its "Living Verge" campaign would not allow PlayerCharacters who possessed the moral attitudes Despicable of Unscrupulous or the trait Amoral. In other words, they weren't allowed to be the ''TabletopGame/StarDrive'' version of evil.
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* Notably averted in ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}},'' where not only do the the Orcs get a campaign, their victory is the [[CuttingOffTheBranches outcome the sequel follows on from]]. Said sequel also gives the bad guys a campaign, but it's the Alliance who canonically win. The games do have elements in the loser's campaign that happen (the raid on Medihv's castle by the humans in 1, the orc civil war in 2). From that point on in both the ''Warcraft'' and ''VideoGame/{{Starcraft}}'' series, every faction gets a campaign and they ''all'' canonically win their campaigns; each campaign is treated as a single time period in a longer storyline.
** The whole thing gets taken to the next level in ''VideoGame/WarcraftIII'', where no matter which race's campaign you get to play in you get to kill at least once race that you were so happily guiding to victory before, with the Night Elves campaign allowing the player to dabble in killing some of all three other major races present in WC III, and then some.

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* Notably averted in ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}},'' where not only do the the Orcs get a campaign, their victory is the [[CuttingOffTheBranches outcome the sequel follows on from]]. Said sequel also gives the bad guys a campaign, but it's the Alliance who canonically win. The games do have elements in the loser's campaign that happen (the raid on Medihv's Medivh's castle by the humans in 1, ''Orcs & Humans'', the orc civil war in 2).''II''). From that point on in both the ''Warcraft'' and ''VideoGame/{{Starcraft}}'' series, every faction gets a campaign and they ''all'' canonically win their campaigns; each campaign is treated as a single time period in a longer storyline.
** The whole thing gets taken to the next level in ''VideoGame/WarcraftIII'', ''Warcraft III'', where no matter which race's campaign you get to play in you get to kill at least once race that you were so happily guiding to victory before, with the Night Elves campaign allowing the player to dabble in killing some of all three other major races present in WC III, and then some.

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