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* Prickly Pear cacti can be found in some islands in ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedOdyssey''. While it's widespread in modern Greece, the species is native the US and Mexico and wouldn't be introduced to Europe for more than two thousand years.


** Many plant species are also found growing outside of their typical climates. In the [[GrimUpNorth cold northern clime]] of Skyrim alone, one can find Boston Ferns (Florida and the Caribbean), Orchids growing in the ground (Philippines, and they grow in ''trees''), Cryptanthus (Brazil), Norfolk Island Pines (New Zealand), and even variegated Algerian Ivy (a modern garden cultivar that was certainly not available to the Scandinavians in the Middle Ages). Likewise, [[FantasticDrug Moon Sugar]], a FantasticDrug similar in appearance and effect to real-world cocaine, is primarily grown in the desert environment of Elsweyr. Real life Coca plants are almost entirely grown in low-altitude South American jungle environments.
*** actually not all orchids grow in trees, and some grow in climates with cold and showy winters. Though unlike the Skyrim orchids, most are fairly small plants. And the ferns shown in the game could easily be a hardy variety like the Buckler Fern. But tomatoes should not be a common crop anywhere farmers frequently complain of frosty nights during the growing season, and anywhere described as "tundra" should not have trees. "treeless" is part of the definition of "tundra"

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** Many plant species are also found growing outside of their typical climates. In the [[GrimUpNorth cold northern clime]] of Skyrim alone, alone (setting of the [[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim eponymous game]]), one can find Boston Ferns (Florida and the Caribbean), Caribbean)[[note]]It is possible that the ferns shown in the game could be a hardy variety, like the Buckler Fern, though they have an appearance closer to the Boston variety[[/note]], Orchids growing in the ground (Philippines, and where they grow in ''trees''), ''trees''[[note]]Not all orchids grow in trees, and some grow in climates with cold and snowy winters. However, unlike the ''Skyrim'' orchids, the ground-growing variety are fairly small plants[[/note]].), Cryptanthus (Brazil), Norfolk Island Pines (New Zealand), and even variegated Algerian Ivy (a modern garden cultivar that was certainly not available to the Scandinavians in the Middle Ages).Ages), tomatoes (which should not be a common crop anywhere farmers frequently complain of frosty nights during the growing season), and anywhere described as "tundra" should not have trees ("treeless" is part of the very definition of "tundra"). Likewise, [[FantasticDrug Moon Sugar]], a FantasticDrug similar in appearance and effect to real-world cocaine, is primarily grown in the desert environment of Elsweyr. Real life Coca plants are almost entirely grown in low-altitude South American jungle environments.
*** actually not all orchids grow in trees, and some grow in climates with cold and showy winters. Though unlike the Skyrim orchids, most are fairly small plants. And the ferns shown in the game could easily be a hardy variety like the Buckler Fern. But tomatoes should not be a common crop anywhere farmers frequently complain of frosty nights during the growing season, and anywhere described as "tundra" should not have trees. "treeless" is part of the definition of "tundra"
environments.

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[[folder: Comic Strips]]
* The daily comic strip ''Crock'' follows a French Foreign Legion unit in North Africa. It routinely features cacti, which only occur naturally in New World deserts (except for the mistletoe cactus, which looks nothing like the stereotypical cactus). May be a case of RealityIsUnrealistic, since several species of cactus from the new world have become naturalized through the Mediterranean basin, with most having been imported more than 100 years ago for use either as crops or ornamentals.
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[[folder:Anime and & Manga]]



[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
* ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove'' features venus flytraps that are apparently [[ArtisticLicenseBiology growing on vines]]... in the middle of the vaguely South American jungle. Real life venus flytraps are found only in a vanishingly small range in coastal North Carolina. They are horrifyingly endangered in the wild. (The More You Know...). And Venus Flytraps don't "snap" shut; it usually takes at least second or two for the trap to mostly close, and several minutes to seal up completely. It also doesn't go "snap" - it's silent. The "teeth" are stiff bits of leaf, so ''no'' they can't bite your finger, nor can anything larger than a largish housefly get stuck in the trap. (Take two leaves, hold them together around your finger. Try to get loose. There ya go.) And despite what you see in movies, the ''biggest'' trap is less than two inches across.

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[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
Animation]]
* ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove'' features venus flytraps that are apparently [[ArtisticLicenseBiology growing on vines]]... in the middle of the vaguely South American jungle. Real life venus flytraps are found only in a vanishingly small range in coastal North Carolina. They are horrifyingly endangered in the wild. (The More You Know...). And Venus Flytraps don't "snap" shut; it usually takes at least second or two for the trap to mostly close, and several minutes to seal up completely. It also doesn't go "snap" - -- it's silent. The "teeth" are stiff bits of leaf, so ''no'' they can't bite your finger, nor can anything larger than a largish housefly get stuck in the trap. (Take two leaves, hold them together around your finger. Try to get loose. There ya go.) And despite what you see in movies, the ''biggest'' trap is less than two inches across.



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[[folder:Theatre]][[folder:Theater]]



* ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'': Plants from the Pacific Northwest (e.g. rhododendrons, ivy)[[note]]Actually, both of these plants are native to the Old World, but definitely not to sub-Saharan Africa[[/note]] in the African jungle. And there aren't any jungles in that part of Kenya anyways.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'': ''VideoGame/Halo3'': Plants from the Pacific Northwest (e.g. rhododendrons, ivy)[[note]]Actually, both of these plants are native to the Old World, but definitely not to sub-Saharan Africa[[/note]] in the African jungle. And there aren't any jungles in that part of Kenya anyways.



* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''

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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'':



* Parodied in the "I Had an Accident" episode from ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants''. While "sandboarding" (the underwater equivalent of snowboarding) down a sand dune, [=SpongeBob=] almost crashes into an unexplained coniferous tree wearing scuba gear.

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* Parodied in the "I Had an Accident" episode from ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants''.''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants''. While "sandboarding" (the underwater equivalent of snowboarding) down a sand dune, [=SpongeBob=] almost crashes into an unexplained coniferous tree wearing scuba gear.



[[folder: Real Life ]]
* Thanks to mankind's tendency to move species around for the hell of it, you can find certain species in areas where they have no right whatsoever to grow. There is a small Caribbean island infested with ''pine trees'' that the government was having the darnedest time killing off. The eucalyptus tree, native to Australia, has expanded across southern California, South Africa, Madagascar's highlands, and Ethiopia, and north of Spain for the same reason. Much like MisplacedWildlife, this either kills off the plants moved or the indigenous plants, depending on the environment. Many countries maintain noxious/invasive weed eradication programs similar to [[http://plants.usda.gov/java/noxiousDriver this US example]].
** Eucalyptus trees in particular are exceptionally good at draining swamps, which is why they were imported into places as diverse as Israel (Mandatory Palestine at the time) and Southern California.
* A good real life example is in California: Palm Trees. They're not native to this area, they were just brought here because they grow nicely here and "look pretty." Problem. Here? They -rain- pollen, so if you're in SoCal and wonder why you can't stop sneezing: it's because of this trope.
** The one exception is [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washingtonia_filifera the Washington Palm]], ''Washingtonia filifera''. It's for this tree that Palm Springs was named. However, this is usually not the same tree that lines the streets of LA and other Southwestern cities.

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[[folder: Real Life ]]
[[folder:Real Life]]
* Thanks to mankind's tendency to move species around for the hell of it, you can find certain species in areas where they have no right whatsoever to grow. There is a small Caribbean island infested with ''pine trees'' that the government was having the darnedest time killing off. The eucalyptus tree, native to Australia, has expanded across southern California, South Africa, Madagascar's highlands, and Ethiopia, and north of Spain for the same reason. Much like MisplacedWildlife, this either kills off the plants moved or the indigenous plants, depending on the environment. Many countries maintain noxious/invasive weed eradication programs similar to [[http://plants.usda.gov/java/noxiousDriver this US example]].
**
example]]. Eucalyptus trees in particular are exceptionally good at draining swamps, which is why they were imported into places as diverse as Israel (Mandatory Palestine at the time) and Southern California.
* A good real life example is in California: Palm Trees. They're not native to this area, they were just brought here because they grow nicely here and "look pretty." Problem. Here? They -rain- ''rain'' pollen, so if you're in SoCal and wonder why you can't stop sneezing: it's because of this trope.
**
trope. The one exception is [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washingtonia_filifera the Washington Palm]], ''Washingtonia filifera''. It's for this tree that Palm Springs was named. However, this is usually not the same tree that lines the streets of LA and other Southwestern cities.



* Tamarisk, aka Salt Cedar, is a drought-hardy plant that was brought to some areas of the US (Colorado and Utah have loads of this, particularly the Colorado river system), but is a majorly invasive species. You see, Tamarisk is originally from the Kazakh steppes not far from Russia. Eastern Colorado has a very similar climate to the Tamarisk's natural habitat, but has none of the natural counters to it. Thus this tree spreads like weeds all over the southwest's precious little water resources. It's difficult to kill off (you can't burn them out, the roots survive to grow again), they can (and in several places DO) suck a river dry, they weed out the native trees and plants and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking they're ugly to boot!]] The Colorado state and local governments have been waging a war against these plants for over 10 years and have yet to make significant progress against them. The current strategy employed is introducing ANOTHER species, the Tamarisk Leaf Beetle, Diorhabda elongata, which is released en mass every year to go out and eat the tamarisk.

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* Tamarisk, aka a.k.a. Salt Cedar, is a drought-hardy plant that was brought to some areas of the US (Colorado and Utah have loads of this, particularly the Colorado river system), but is a majorly invasive species. You see, Tamarisk is originally from the Kazakh steppes not far from Russia. Eastern Colorado has a very similar climate to the Tamarisk's natural habitat, but has none of the natural counters to it. Thus this tree spreads like weeds all over the southwest's precious little water resources. It's difficult to kill off (you can't burn them out, the roots survive to grow again), they can (and in several places DO) suck a river dry, they weed out the native trees and plants and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking they're ugly to boot!]] The Colorado state and local governments have been waging a war against these plants for over 10 years and have yet to make significant progress against them. The current strategy employed is introducing ANOTHER species, the Tamarisk Leaf Beetle, Diorhabda elongata, which is released en mass every year to go out and eat the tamarisk.



** Likewise, the common dandelion isn't native to North America. It was introduced by European settlers as a salad green and medicinal herb, and has gone on to become the single most recognizable lawn-and-garden weed on the continent. There ''are'' native species in the same genus, but ironically they're mostly being driven extinct by competition from the invasive sort and/or by gardeners' indiscriminate attempts to eradicate anything that ''looks'' like a dandelion.

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** * Likewise, the common dandelion isn't native to North America. It was introduced by European settlers as a salad green and medicinal herb, and has gone on to become the single most recognizable lawn-and-garden weed on the continent. There ''are'' native species in the same genus, but ironically they're mostly being driven extinct by competition from the invasive sort and/or by gardeners' indiscriminate attempts to eradicate anything that ''looks'' like a dandelion.



* Blackcurrant almost became this. It's native to Europe, but was outlawed in the US because it carried the vector for white pine rust, and this threatened the logging industry in New England. While it is not a federal ban anymore, it's making a bit of a "comeback" from places like New York.
** As a result of the longtime ban for Blackcurrant, combined with the fact that they don't grow ''as'' well, Americans prefer the more native Blueberries or Cranberries.
* Somewhat zigzagged with Raspberries - Surprisingly they are ''also'' native to the old world ''and'' the new world.
* Another Floridian example - one variety of melaleuca, the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melaleuca_quinquenervia paper bark tea tree]] (usually just "melaleuca" to locals) was originally brought in to help quickly drain swampland to make more habitable land, particularly near the Everglades. Between its thirst, its ability to block out saplings of local plants, and the fact that almost nothing native to Florida eats it, it has become a serious menace to the Everglades.
* Anywhere north of the sixtieth parallel is either boreal forest, tundra, or shield country (or, if you go ''really'' far north, sea ice). Boreal forest has a very distinctive appearance - the trees are mostly conifers, with the occasional birch or larch[[note]]which despite appearances, is actually a deciduous conifer; contrary to common belief, the two aren't mutually exclusive[[/note]] thrown in, and very tall and skinny. A forest full of thick deciduous angiosperm (or worse, non-coniferous gymnosperm; very few will confuse a ginkgo for a pine) trees pretending to be the Yukon isn't particularly convincing, no matter how much snow is on the ground.

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* Blackcurrant almost became this. It's native to Europe, but was outlawed in the US because it carried the vector for white pine rust, and this threatened the logging industry in New England. While it is not a federal ban anymore, it's making a bit of a "comeback" from places like New York. As a result of the longtime ban for Blackcurrant, combined with the fact that they don't grow ''as'' well, Americans prefer the more native Blueberries or Cranberries.
* Somewhat zigzagged with Raspberries -- surprisingly they are ''also'' native to the old world ''and'' the new world.

** As a result of the longtime ban for Blackcurrant, combined with the fact that they don't grow ''as'' well, Americans prefer the more native Blueberries or Cranberries.
* Somewhat zigzagged with Raspberries - Surprisingly they are ''also'' native to the old world ''and'' the new world.
* Another Floridian example - -- one variety of melaleuca, the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melaleuca_quinquenervia paper bark tea tree]] (usually just "melaleuca" to locals) was originally brought in to help quickly drain swampland to make more habitable land, particularly near the Everglades. Between its thirst, its ability to block out saplings of local plants, and the fact that almost nothing native to Florida eats it, it has become a serious menace to the Everglades.
* Anywhere north of the sixtieth parallel is either boreal forest, tundra, or shield country (or, if you go ''really'' far north, sea ice). Boreal forest has a very distinctive appearance - -- the trees are mostly conifers, with the occasional birch or larch[[note]]which despite appearances, is actually a deciduous conifer; contrary to common belief, the two aren't mutually exclusive[[/note]] thrown in, and very tall and skinny. A forest full of thick deciduous angiosperm (or worse, non-coniferous gymnosperm; very few will confuse a ginkgo for a pine) trees pretending to be the Yukon isn't particularly convincing, no matter how much snow is on the ground.



* The Middle Ages in general are a big victim of this, what with all the American crops that didn't exist there yet, the most conspicuous being potatoes, a staple food in modern Europe. Name the fantasy novel that takes place in pseudo-Medieval-Europe that doesn't have potatoes in it. They're just too yummy to let go.
** Similarly, tomatoes. Tomatoes originated in South America. Today, Italian cuisine puts tomatoes in a ''lot''--and even then, the Italians don't use tomato as much as some of the other Mediterraneans (the Spaniards, Turks, and Egyptians come to mind for putting tomatoes in anything they can think of).

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* The Middle Ages in general are a big victim of this, what with all the American crops that didn't exist there yet, the yet.
** The
most conspicuous being potatoes, a staple food in modern Europe. Name the fantasy novel that takes place in pseudo-Medieval-Europe that doesn't have potatoes in it. They're just too yummy to let go.
** Similarly, tomatoes. Tomatoes originated in South America. Today, Italian cuisine puts tomatoes in a ''lot''--and ''lot'' -- and even then, the Italians don't use tomato as much as some of the other Mediterraneans (the Spaniards, Turks, and Egyptians come to mind for putting tomatoes in anything they can think of).



** Speaking of Hawaii, this is a very interesting example. Studies have shown that sweet potatoes were a widely-used crop of ancient Hawaii. More studies have shown that sweet potatoes are, in fact, not native to Hawaii or any of the islands the Native Hawaiians could've migrated from. They're actually native to South America. How the Native Hawaiians obtained sweet potatoes has been a subject of debate.

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** * Speaking of Hawaii, this is a very interesting example. Studies have shown that sweet potatoes were a widely-used crop of ancient Hawaii. More studies have shown that sweet potatoes are, in fact, not native to Hawaii or any of the islands the Native Hawaiians could've migrated from. They're actually native to South America. How the Native Hawaiians obtained sweet potatoes has been a subject of debate.



* ''Rhododendron ponticum'' is not native to the UK, having been introduced in the 18th century (it had existed in region prior to the last Ice Age but had not recolonised after the ice retreated). It has caused untold damage to the native flora and fauna and is considered a major pest with eradication strategies having been in place for years. However, it's found everywhere so people often don't realise that it's an introduced species, or how much damage it's doing to the environment. This lack of awareness is especially evident in period shows where, despite the producers doing their best to make the location look as un-modern as possible, they don't tend to care if plants such as rhododendron appear in shot despite them not having been introduced to the country at the time of the show's setting.

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* ''Rhododendron ponticum'' is not native to the UK, having been introduced in the 18th century (it had existed in region prior to the last Ice Age but had not recolonised after the ice retreated). It has caused untold damage to the native flora and fauna and is considered a major pest with eradication strategies having been in place for years. However, it's found everywhere so people often don't realise realize that it's an introduced species, or how much damage it's doing to the environment. This lack of awareness is especially evident in period shows where, despite the producers doing their best to make the location look as un-modern as possible, they don't tend to care if plants such as rhododendron appear in shot despite them not having been introduced to the country at the time of the show's setting.






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[[caption-width-right:300:♪ Sooooo why is a conifer under the sea? ♫]]
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[[quoteright:300:[[WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ihadanaccidentplus.jpg]]]]








* Parodied in the "I Had an Accident" episode from in ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarepants''. While "sandboarding" (the underwater equivalent of snowboarding) down a sand dune, [=SpongeBob=] almost crashes into an unexplained coniferous tree wearing scuba gear.

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* Parodied in the "I Had an Accident" episode from in ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarepants''.''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants''. While "sandboarding" (the underwater equivalent of snowboarding) down a sand dune, [=SpongeBob=] almost crashes into an unexplained coniferous tree wearing scuba gear.

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* Parodied in the "I Had an Accident" episode from in ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarepants''. While "sandboarding" (the underwater equivalent of snowboarding) down a sand dune, [=SpongeBob=] almost crashes into an unexplained coniferous tree wearing scuba gear.


* It's occasionally claimed that the trees visible in establishing shots on ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' couldn't possibly grow in a New York climate -- however, [[RealityIsUnrealistic those shots are all taken in New York]]!

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* It's occasionally claimed that the trees visible in establishing shots on ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' couldn't possibly grow in a New York climate -- however, [[RealityIsUnrealistic [[AluminumChristmasTrees those shots are all taken in New York]]!


* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has been known to feature American vegetation on planets, even the ones where no man has gone before. Since they also have HumanAliens, Klingon coffee, and ''Romans speaking modern American English'', that's hardly inconsistent. They [[HandWave wave]] [[HollywoodEvolution "parallel evolution"]] around a lot on Franchise/StarTrek. For a specific example of getting real-world vegetation wrong in Franchise/StarTrek that doesn't have the "another planet" excuse, in the first episode of ''Enterpise,'' the Klingon ship crashes in Broken Bow, Oklahoma in the middle of a flat corn field. Broken Bow is far from flat, and in a coniferous forest to boot. You'd have to go to central and western Oklahoma to have any big giant corn fields like the one shown in this episode. Also doubles as YouFailGeographyForever due to the lack of the ubiquitous Ouachita Mountains that surround the area. Now, it wouldn't be bad if it had been set in Broken'' Arrow'', which still has rolling hills, but has lots of flat areas to grow corn in, but they apparently didn't think of that.

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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has been known to feature American vegetation on planets, even the ones where no man has gone before. Since they also have HumanAliens, Klingon coffee, and ''Romans speaking modern American English'', that's hardly inconsistent. They [[HandWave wave]] [[HollywoodEvolution "parallel evolution"]] around a lot on Franchise/StarTrek. For a specific example of getting real-world vegetation wrong in Franchise/StarTrek that doesn't have the "another planet" excuse, in the first episode of ''Enterpise,'' the Klingon ship crashes in Broken Bow, Oklahoma in the middle of a flat corn field. Broken Bow is far from flat, and in a coniferous forest to boot. You'd have to go to central and western Oklahoma to have any big giant corn fields like the one shown in this episode. Also doubles as YouFailGeographyForever ArtisticLicenseGeography due to the lack of the ubiquitous Ouachita Mountains that surround the area. Now, it wouldn't be bad if it had been set in Broken'' Arrow'', which still has rolling hills, but has lots of flat areas to grow corn in, but they apparently didn't think of that.

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*** actually not all orchids grow in trees, and some grow in climates with cold and showy winters. Though unlike the Skyrim orchids, most are fairly small plants. And the ferns shown in the game could easily be a hardy variety like the Buckler Fern. But tomatoes should not be a common crop anywhere farmers frequently complain of frosty nights during the growing season, and anywhere described as "tundra" should not have trees. "treeless" is part of the definition of "tundra"

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* ''Literature/{{Hawksmaid}}'', a YA novel about the teenage Maid Marian and Myth/RobinHood, contains multiple references to potatoes; a vegetable completely unknown in 12th century England.


* In the multiplayer level "Turbine" in ''CallOfDutyBlackOpsII'', there are cacti littered around the map, which is explicitly set in the Sarawat Steppes of Yemen, on the Arabian Peninsula. Thing is, cacti are native to the Americas, not western Asia. Since the game is set in the future, though, you could make the argument that they're a non-native invasive species.

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* In the multiplayer level "Turbine" in ''CallOfDutyBlackOpsII'', ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsII'', there are cacti littered around the map, which is explicitly set in the Sarawat Steppes of Yemen, on the Arabian Peninsula. Thing is, cacti are native to the Americas, not western Asia. Since the game is set in the future, though, you could make the argument that they're a non-native invasive species.


* Blackcurrant almost became this. It's native to Europe, but was outlawed in the US because it carried the vector for white pine rust, and this threatened the logging industry in New England. While it is not a federal ban anymore, it's making a bit of a "comeback" from places like New York. (As a result, Americans prefer the more native Cranberries or blueberries.)

to:

* Blackcurrant almost became this. It's native to Europe, but was outlawed in the US because it carried the vector for white pine rust, and this threatened the logging industry in New England. While it is not a federal ban anymore, it's making a bit of a "comeback" from places like New York. (As
** As
a result, result of the longtime ban for Blackcurrant, combined with the fact that they don't grow ''as'' well, Americans prefer the more native Cranberries Blueberries or blueberries.)Cranberries.
* Somewhat zigzagged with Raspberries - Surprisingly they are ''also'' native to the old world ''and'' the new world.


* Kudzu in the southeastern US is another notorious example; it's originally from China. Fun fact: it's edible. The Japanese make desserts out of the starch and jelly from the flowers, and the Vietnamese mix the starch with citrus and water to make a refreshing summertime drink.

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* Kudzu in the southeastern US is another notorious example; it's originally from China. Fun fact: it's edible. (You can eat the vine that ate the south!) The Japanese make desserts out of the starch and jelly from the flowers, and the Vietnamese mix the starch with citrus and water to make a refreshing summertime drink.



* Pineapples are strongly associated with Hawaii... and originated in South America. To the extent that in Peru, if not other South American countries, restaurants will frequently call menu items "Hawaiian" if pineapple is an ingredient.

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* Pineapples are strongly associated with Hawaii...Hawaii and the Caribbean... and originated in South America. To the extent that in Peru, if not other South American countries, restaurants will frequently call menu items "Hawaiian" if pineapple is an ingredient.

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